Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: McKernan, Signe-Mary; Ratcliffe, Caroline; Shanks, Trina Williams
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2012

    Is poverty incompatible with asset accumulation? We examine whether the poor can and do save and whether they are able to build up assets over time. Data are presented from household surveys, as well as from programs targeted at helping families accumulate assets. Presenting and evaluating the state of knowledge provides a new lens on whether the current income-based safety net could better serve poor families by having an asset building component. Conventional thinking is that families that are income poor cannot save. This chapter shows that this thinking is inaccurate; poverty does not have to be incompatible with asset accumulation. (author abstract)

     

    Is poverty incompatible with asset accumulation? We examine whether the poor can and do save and whether they are able to build up assets over time. Data are presented from household surveys, as well as from programs targeted at helping families accumulate assets. Presenting and evaluating the state of knowledge provides a new lens on whether the current income-based safety net could better serve poor families by having an asset building component. Conventional thinking is that families that are income poor cannot save. This chapter shows that this thinking is inaccurate; poverty does not have to be incompatible with asset accumulation. (author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Office of Community Services
    Year: 2010

    This Tenth Annual Report presents the status of the Assets for Independence (AFI) program as of the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2009. It provides a brief overview of the AFI program’s origin and ongoing administration, basic mechanics, and operational characteristics. The Report also identifies key outputs and the critical outcomes. (author abstract)

    This Tenth Annual Report presents the status of the Assets for Independence (AFI) program as of the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2009. It provides a brief overview of the AFI program’s origin and ongoing administration, basic mechanics, and operational characteristics. The Report also identifies key outputs and the critical outcomes. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Brandolini, Andrea; Magri, Silvia; Smeeding, Timothy M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    Poverty is generally defined as income or expenditure insufficiency, but the economic condition of a household also depends on its real and financial asset holdings. This paper investigates measures of poverty that rely on indicators of household net worth. We review and assess two main approaches followed in the literature: income–net worth measures and asset-poverty. We provide fresh cross-national evidence based on data from the Luxembourg Wealth Study. (author abstract)

    This article was previously published as a working paper by the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin.

    Poverty is generally defined as income or expenditure insufficiency, but the economic condition of a household also depends on its real and financial asset holdings. This paper investigates measures of poverty that rely on indicators of household net worth. We review and assess two main approaches followed in the literature: income–net worth measures and asset-poverty. We provide fresh cross-national evidence based on data from the Luxembourg Wealth Study. (author abstract)

    This article was previously published as a working paper by the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin.

  • Individual Author: McKernan, Signe-Mary; Ratcliffe, Caroline; Vinopal, Katie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    Family events, such as a job loss, the onset of health limitations, and a change in family structure, can adversely affect family well-being. The impact of these events may be mitigated if the family holds assets that can be used to maintain consumption. Using the SIPP, this study examines the role of assets in families' economic stability. We find that families in all parts of the income distribution experience material hardship after a negative event. Further, in the aftermath of a negative event, asset-poor families experience more hardship than non-asset-poor families, with assets helping most for low- and middle-income families. (author abstract)

    Family events, such as a job loss, the onset of health limitations, and a change in family structure, can adversely affect family well-being. The impact of these events may be mitigated if the family holds assets that can be used to maintain consumption. Using the SIPP, this study examines the role of assets in families' economic stability. We find that families in all parts of the income distribution experience material hardship after a negative event. Further, in the aftermath of a negative event, asset-poor families experience more hardship than non-asset-poor families, with assets helping most for low- and middle-income families. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Grinstein-Weiss, Michal; Yeo, Yeong H.; Despard, Mathieu R.; Zhan, Min
    Reference Type: Report, Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    Using data from the 4-year American Dream Demonstration, this study compared saving performance and program participation of banked participants (n = 1,538) with unbanked participants (n = 466) enrolled in 14 IDA programs across the United States. The study found that unbanked participants had $3.26 lower average monthly net deposit (p<.05) and 5% lower deposit frequency p<.001) than banked participants. Unbanked participants had 45% greater odds of dropout than banked participants (p<.001). Further analyses looking at the intervening variables suggested that the combined effects of car ownership, education, race, and monthly savings targets significantly reduced the savings gap between the two groups. (author abstract)

    Using data from the 4-year American Dream Demonstration, this study compared saving performance and program participation of banked participants (n = 1,538) with unbanked participants (n = 466) enrolled in 14 IDA programs across the United States. The study found that unbanked participants had $3.26 lower average monthly net deposit (p<.05) and 5% lower deposit frequency p<.001) than banked participants. Unbanked participants had 45% greater odds of dropout than banked participants (p<.001). Further analyses looking at the intervening variables suggested that the combined effects of car ownership, education, race, and monthly savings targets significantly reduced the savings gap between the two groups. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2001 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations