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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
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  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Kornrich, Sabino; Rodriguez, Natassia
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    This article examines low-income parents’ monetary investments in their young children, asking how low-income families are able to afford spending on children. We investigate parental spending on child care and on goods in the home that may provide enrichment for young children. We find little evidence that households make spending trade-offs for either type of good. Instead, our results suggest that low-income households that can afford child care may be poor only temporarily and that they spend primarily when they are unable to avoid doing so because of family work patterns. For enrichment goods, parental education is a stronger predictor of spending. (Author abstract)

    This article examines low-income parents’ monetary investments in their young children, asking how low-income families are able to afford spending on children. We investigate parental spending on child care and on goods in the home that may provide enrichment for young children. We find little evidence that households make spending trade-offs for either type of good. Instead, our results suggest that low-income households that can afford child care may be poor only temporarily and that they spend primarily when they are unable to avoid doing so because of family work patterns. For enrichment goods, parental education is a stronger predictor of spending. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nielsen, Robert B.; Needles Fletcher, Cynthia ; Bartholomae, Suzanne
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2016

    The Great Recession and the slow recovery afterward affected families from all socioeconomic strata. However, by many measures low-income families were hardest hit. To highlight the consumer finance challenges currently faced by low-income families we combine data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation with a review of several relevant research areas. These include real income declines before and after the recession; trends in being unbanked/underbanked; the use of credit and alternative financial services; savings and asset accumulation, including homes and vehicles; and health insurance. A brief discussion of future directions for research completes the chapter. (Author abstract)

    The Great Recession and the slow recovery afterward affected families from all socioeconomic strata. However, by many measures low-income families were hardest hit. To highlight the consumer finance challenges currently faced by low-income families we combine data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation with a review of several relevant research areas. These include real income declines before and after the recession; trends in being unbanked/underbanked; the use of credit and alternative financial services; savings and asset accumulation, including homes and vehicles; and health insurance. A brief discussion of future directions for research completes the chapter. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Federal Reserve Board of Governors
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Many households in the United States have been tested by the Great Recession. Large-scale financial strain at the household level ultimately fed into broader economic challenges for the country, and the completion of the national recovery will ultimately be, in part, a reflection of the well-being of households and consumers. Because households' finances can change at a rapid pace and new opportunities and risks may emerge, such recovery can be complex to monitor.

    To better understand the financial state of U.S. households, the Federal Reserve Board conducted a new consumer survey, the results of which are described in this report. The Survey of Household Economics and Decisionmaking (SHED) was conducted by the Board's Division of Consumer and Community Affairs in September 2013 using a nationally representative online survey panel. The purpose of the SHED was to capture a snapshot of the financial and economic well-being of U.S. households and the issues they face, as well as to monitor their recovery from the Great Recession and identify perceived risks to their...

    Many households in the United States have been tested by the Great Recession. Large-scale financial strain at the household level ultimately fed into broader economic challenges for the country, and the completion of the national recovery will ultimately be, in part, a reflection of the well-being of households and consumers. Because households' finances can change at a rapid pace and new opportunities and risks may emerge, such recovery can be complex to monitor.

    To better understand the financial state of U.S. households, the Federal Reserve Board conducted a new consumer survey, the results of which are described in this report. The Survey of Household Economics and Decisionmaking (SHED) was conducted by the Board's Division of Consumer and Community Affairs in September 2013 using a nationally representative online survey panel. The purpose of the SHED was to capture a snapshot of the financial and economic well-being of U.S. households and the issues they face, as well as to monitor their recovery from the Great Recession and identify perceived risks to their financial stability. It further collected information on households that was not readily available from other sources or was not available in combination with other variables of interest. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: McKernan, Signe-Mary; Ratcliffe, Caroline; Steuerle, C. Eugene; Zhang, Sisi
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Income inequality understates the size of the economic gap between whites and minorities in the United States. In 2010, whites on average had two times the income of blacks and Hispanics, but six times the wealth. Analyses of wealth accumulation over the life cycle show that the racial wealth gap grows sharply with age. Wealth isn't just money in the bank, it's insurance against tough times, tuition to get a better education and a better job, savings to retire on, and a springboard into the middle class. (author abstract)

    Income inequality understates the size of the economic gap between whites and minorities in the United States. In 2010, whites on average had two times the income of blacks and Hispanics, but six times the wealth. Analyses of wealth accumulation over the life cycle show that the racial wealth gap grows sharply with age. Wealth isn't just money in the bank, it's insurance against tough times, tuition to get a better education and a better job, savings to retire on, and a springboard into the middle class. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rhee, Nari
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    New NIRS research examines racial disparities in retirement readiness among working-age Americans and households.

    A new report calculates the severity of the U.S. retirement security racial divide. The analysis finds that every racial group faces significant risks, but people of color face particularly severe challenges in preparing for retirement. Americans of color are significantly less likely than whites to have an employer-sponsored retirement plan or an individual retirement account (IRA), which substantially drives down the level of retirement savings.

    Race and Retirement Insecurity in the United States examines retirement readiness racial disparities among working households age 25-64. It analyzes three key areas – workplace retirement coverage, retirement account ownership, and retirement account balances. (author abstract)

    New NIRS research examines racial disparities in retirement readiness among working-age Americans and households.

    A new report calculates the severity of the U.S. retirement security racial divide. The analysis finds that every racial group faces significant risks, but people of color face particularly severe challenges in preparing for retirement. Americans of color are significantly less likely than whites to have an employer-sponsored retirement plan or an individual retirement account (IRA), which substantially drives down the level of retirement savings.

    Race and Retirement Insecurity in the United States examines retirement readiness racial disparities among working households age 25-64. It analyzes three key areas – workplace retirement coverage, retirement account ownership, and retirement account balances. (author abstract)

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