Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Cozzolino, Elizabeth
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Previous studies of poverty governance have focused on the welfare system, the criminal justice system, and the connections between them. Yet less attention has been paid to a third institution that bridges the gap between these two systems: child support enforcement. Jailing for child support nonpayment is one of many mechanisms of child support enforcement, but little is known about this tactic. Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, the author examines the process of nonresident fathers’ (1) acquiring a formal support order, (2) accruing child support debt, and (3) being jailed for this debt. The author proposes two pathways into jail for child support nonpayment—public assistance and relationship context—and demonstrates how each pathway affects the risk for jail. Overall, 14 percent of debtors spend time in jail for child support by the time their children are nine years old. (Author abstract)

    Previous studies of poverty governance have focused on the welfare system, the criminal justice system, and the connections between them. Yet less attention has been paid to a third institution that bridges the gap between these two systems: child support enforcement. Jailing for child support nonpayment is one of many mechanisms of child support enforcement, but little is known about this tactic. Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, the author examines the process of nonresident fathers’ (1) acquiring a formal support order, (2) accruing child support debt, and (3) being jailed for this debt. The author proposes two pathways into jail for child support nonpayment—public assistance and relationship context—and demonstrates how each pathway affects the risk for jail. Overall, 14 percent of debtors spend time in jail for child support by the time their children are nine years old. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Passarella, Letitia Logan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The report describes the characteristics of obligors and their child support cases as well as their employment and earnings. We also compare obligors earning the fulltime minimum wage rate or less with those earning the Maryland living wage in order to examine each group’s ability to pay their obligations. (Edited author introduction)

     

    The report describes the characteristics of obligors and their child support cases as well as their employment and earnings. We also compare obligors earning the fulltime minimum wage rate or less with those earning the Maryland living wage in order to examine each group’s ability to pay their obligations. (Edited author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Demyan, Natalie; Passarella, Letitia Logan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This brief uses the sample of orders from Maryland’s 2011 to 2014 case-level guidelines review to assess outcomes of imputation on payment compliance. It compares obligors who had their incomes imputed at the fulltime minimum wage rate to those who did not. We answer the following research questions:

    1. Did obligors’ incomes listed on child support guidelines worksheets correspond to their actual earnings, and did accuracy differ by imputation status?
    2. What were the payment compliance outcomes of obligors, and did they differ by imputation status? 

    Additionally, the case characteristics, actual earnings, and payment compliance outcomes of obligors whose incomes were imputed to full-time minimum wage are compared with obligors whose worksheet incomes were below the full-time minimum wage rate. This was done to explore if refraining from full-time income imputation was associated with better payment compliance outcomes among obligors with low earnings. (Edited author introduction)

     

    This brief uses the sample of orders from Maryland’s 2011 to 2014 case-level guidelines review to assess outcomes of imputation on payment compliance. It compares obligors who had their incomes imputed at the fulltime minimum wage rate to those who did not. We answer the following research questions:

    1. Did obligors’ incomes listed on child support guidelines worksheets correspond to their actual earnings, and did accuracy differ by imputation status?
    2. What were the payment compliance outcomes of obligors, and did they differ by imputation status? 

    Additionally, the case characteristics, actual earnings, and payment compliance outcomes of obligors whose incomes were imputed to full-time minimum wage are compared with obligors whose worksheet incomes were below the full-time minimum wage rate. This was done to explore if refraining from full-time income imputation was associated with better payment compliance outcomes among obligors with low earnings. (Edited author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: McLeod, Branden A.; Gottlieb, Aaron
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    The child support program promotes parental responsibility, so that children receive support from both parents even when they live in separate households. While this program aims to reduce poverty, the program has financially burdensome consequences for low income, noncustodial parents who have experienced incarceration. Noncustodial parents may accrue arrears when they are unable to work due to incarceration. This study examines the relationship between incarceration and child support arrears among low-income fathers. The results from the analyses imply that incarceration is a predictor of fathers' accruing child support debt and fathers who have experienced incarceration tend to have higher child support arrears than fathers who have not experienced incarceration. This illustrates that people seeking to reintegrate into society from correctional institutions face economic disadvantages making it more difficult for them to contribute financially to their families. This study concludes with policy solutions which create cohesion between the child support and criminal justice...

    The child support program promotes parental responsibility, so that children receive support from both parents even when they live in separate households. While this program aims to reduce poverty, the program has financially burdensome consequences for low income, noncustodial parents who have experienced incarceration. Noncustodial parents may accrue arrears when they are unable to work due to incarceration. This study examines the relationship between incarceration and child support arrears among low-income fathers. The results from the analyses imply that incarceration is a predictor of fathers' accruing child support debt and fathers who have experienced incarceration tend to have higher child support arrears than fathers who have not experienced incarceration. This illustrates that people seeking to reintegrate into society from correctional institutions face economic disadvantages making it more difficult for them to contribute financially to their families. This study concludes with policy solutions which create cohesion between the child support and criminal justice systems. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Gleason, Elizabeth; Passarella, Letitia Logan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The federal IV-D child support program plays a vital role in ensuring that both parents contribute to the material needs of their children. According to the federal Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE), more than $28.5 billion was collected and distributed to families in federal fiscal year 2015, through both direct payments and income withholding (OCSE, 2016a). In Maryland, the Child Support Enforcement Administration (CSEA) collected and distributed 69% of current support due, over $533 million on behalf of families. These distributions help custodial parents care for their children and can make up a significant portion of household income for poor families (Sorensen, 2010). (Author abstract)

    The federal IV-D child support program plays a vital role in ensuring that both parents contribute to the material needs of their children. According to the federal Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE), more than $28.5 billion was collected and distributed to families in federal fiscal year 2015, through both direct payments and income withholding (OCSE, 2016a). In Maryland, the Child Support Enforcement Administration (CSEA) collected and distributed 69% of current support due, over $533 million on behalf of families. These distributions help custodial parents care for their children and can make up a significant portion of household income for poor families (Sorensen, 2010). (Author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1996 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations