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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Schexnayder, Deanna; Schroeder, Daniel; Lein, Laura; Dominguez, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    In the post-welfare-reform era, many states have begun conducting research to determine how the new policies affect the families they serve. In particular, states need to understand if former welfare recipients are employed or receiving other types of economic supports, how many have returned to welfare, and reasons for families’ success or failure. This report addresses the following questions: - What are the characteristics of families who left or were diverted from TANF? - To what extent are these families participating in other government programs, especially Medicaid and food stamps? - To what extent are these families employed and/or receiving other economic supports, such as child support and child care subsidies? - Over time, how do these families manage and what hardships do they face? - How do potential applicants view the diversion/application process? - Are there particular points after leaving TANF at which people are the most vulnerable to returning? - Which factors are associated with leaving TANF, being employed, or returning to TANF? This report examines these...

    In the post-welfare-reform era, many states have begun conducting research to determine how the new policies affect the families they serve. In particular, states need to understand if former welfare recipients are employed or receiving other types of economic supports, how many have returned to welfare, and reasons for families’ success or failure. This report addresses the following questions: - What are the characteristics of families who left or were diverted from TANF? - To what extent are these families participating in other government programs, especially Medicaid and food stamps? - To what extent are these families employed and/or receiving other economic supports, such as child support and child care subsidies? - Over time, how do these families manage and what hardships do they face? - How do potential applicants view the diversion/application process? - Are there particular points after leaving TANF at which people are the most vulnerable to returning? - Which factors are associated with leaving TANF, being employed, or returning to TANF? This report examines these research questions for two populations of low-income families: those diverted from TANF prior to enrollment and those who have left TANF. Among ‘diverted’ families, three types are being studied: families redirected prior to TANF application, those denied TANF for non-financial reasons, and approved TANF applicants opting to receive a one-time payment in lieu of TANF benefits.(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lacey, Darren; Hetling-Wernyj, Andrea; Born, Catherine E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    Despite the seemingly commonsensical basis for using diversion in certain situations, there have been few studies examining the characteristics of diverted families and the outcomes achieved through diversion. The study described in this report begins to fill that information gap for Maryland. It provides state officials with the same type of information about families who have experienced “life without welfare” as other of our studies have provided about families living “life after welfare” and “life on welfare”.1 The key study questions are:

    1. To what extent are two types of formal diversion, lump sum payments and rapid employment services, used and what are the characteristics of diverted families? 

    2. In terms of outcomes related to employment and wages, what happens to diverted families over time? 

    3. Does formal diversion prevent cash assistance receipt or just defer that receipt for some period of time? 

    4. What are the patterns of Food Stamp and Medical Assistance participation among diverted families? 

    To address these questions, the...

    Despite the seemingly commonsensical basis for using diversion in certain situations, there have been few studies examining the characteristics of diverted families and the outcomes achieved through diversion. The study described in this report begins to fill that information gap for Maryland. It provides state officials with the same type of information about families who have experienced “life without welfare” as other of our studies have provided about families living “life after welfare” and “life on welfare”.1 The key study questions are:

    1. To what extent are two types of formal diversion, lump sum payments and rapid employment services, used and what are the characteristics of diverted families? 

    2. In terms of outcomes related to employment and wages, what happens to diverted families over time? 

    3. Does formal diversion prevent cash assistance receipt or just defer that receipt for some period of time? 

    4. What are the patterns of Food Stamp and Medical Assistance participation among diverted families? 

    To address these questions, the study uses administrative data sources to examine the prevalence of diversion and the baseline characteristics of Maryland
    families (n=4,219) formally diverted from cash assistance during a two year period (April 1998 - March 2000), through lump sum awards, Welfare Avoidance Grants, (n=2,023) and “rapid employment” services (n=2,196). Separate attention is given to the two groups and twelve month post-diversion outcomes for each group are also presented. (author abstract)