Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Hartig, Seth
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2019

    This presentation was given at the 57th National Association for Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Workshop in 2019. The presentation provides an overview of the perils of food assistance and other social services benefits cliffs, as well as the results of a study on the effects of minimum wage and inflation on benefit limits. Discrepencies between market rates and subsidies for food, child care, and other needs can cause families to face severe financial circumstances when they reach sharp benefit limits.

    This presentation was given at the 57th National Association for Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Workshop in 2019. The presentation provides an overview of the perils of food assistance and other social services benefits cliffs, as well as the results of a study on the effects of minimum wage and inflation on benefit limits. Discrepencies between market rates and subsidies for food, child care, and other needs can cause families to face severe financial circumstances when they reach sharp benefit limits.

  • Individual Author: Adams, Gina; Spaulding, Shayne
    Reference Type: White Papers
    Year: 2018

    Work requirements for key safety net programs are currently being discussed across the country. It is important that this debate be based on an understanding of what recipients need to meet those requirements and to successfully place themselves on a path toward self-sufficiency. Among those potentially subject to work requirements are low-income parents with limited education and low skills who need education and training to find and keep stable jobs. However, a lack of quality, affordable child care often stands in their way. To inform current policy deliberations, we have compiled research insights about meeting the child care needs of low-income parents seeking education and job training from the dozen studies produced under Urban Institute’s “Bridging the Gap: Exploring the Intersection between Child Care and Workforce Development for Low-Income Parents” project. This brief highlights key insights for policymakers and lays out further questions to be explored. (Author abstract)

     

     

     

    Work requirements for key safety net programs are currently being discussed across the country. It is important that this debate be based on an understanding of what recipients need to meet those requirements and to successfully place themselves on a path toward self-sufficiency. Among those potentially subject to work requirements are low-income parents with limited education and low skills who need education and training to find and keep stable jobs. However, a lack of quality, affordable child care often stands in their way. To inform current policy deliberations, we have compiled research insights about meeting the child care needs of low-income parents seeking education and job training from the dozen studies produced under Urban Institute’s “Bridging the Gap: Exploring the Intersection between Child Care and Workforce Development for Low-Income Parents” project. This brief highlights key insights for policymakers and lays out further questions to be explored. (Author abstract)

     

     

     

  • Individual Author: Bauer, Lauren; Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore; Shambaugh, Jay
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Basic assistance programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly the Food Stamp Program) and Medicaid ensure families have access to food and medical care when they are low-income. Some policymakers at the federal and state levels intend to add new work requirements to SNAP and Medicaid. In this paper, we analyze those who would be impacted by an expansion of work requirements in SNAP and an introduction of work requirements into Medicaid. We characterize the types of individuals who would face work requirements, describe their labor force experience over 24 consecutive months, and identify the reasons why they are not working if they experience a period of unemployment or labor force nonparticipation. We find that the majority of SNAP and Medicaid participants who would be exposed to work requirements are attached to the labor force, but that a substantial share would fail to consistently meet a 20 hours per week–threshold. Among persistent labor force nonparticipants, health issues are the predominant reason given for not working. There may be...

    Basic assistance programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly the Food Stamp Program) and Medicaid ensure families have access to food and medical care when they are low-income. Some policymakers at the federal and state levels intend to add new work requirements to SNAP and Medicaid. In this paper, we analyze those who would be impacted by an expansion of work requirements in SNAP and an introduction of work requirements into Medicaid. We characterize the types of individuals who would face work requirements, describe their labor force experience over 24 consecutive months, and identify the reasons why they are not working if they experience a period of unemployment or labor force nonparticipation. We find that the majority of SNAP and Medicaid participants who would be exposed to work requirements are attached to the labor force, but that a substantial share would fail to consistently meet a 20 hours per week–threshold. Among persistent labor force nonparticipants, health issues are the predominant reason given for not working. There may be some subset of SNAP and Medicaid participants who could work, are not working, and might work if they were threatened with the loss of benefits. This paper adds evidence to a growing body of research that shows that this group is very small relative to those who would be sanctioned under the proposed policies who are already working or are legitimately unable to work. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wheaton, Laura; Lynch, Victoria; Johnson, Martha C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report examines the overlap in eligibility of children and nonelderly adults for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Medicaid/Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) benefits in 2013, prior to Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. We find that over half of children eligible for one program were eligible for both, and nearly all of the remaining children were eligible for Medicaid/CHIP. A substantially smaller share of parents and nonparents were eligible for both SNAP and Medicaid/CHIP. The report also provides state-level estimates to allow calculation of state joint program participation rates. (Author abstract)

    This report examines the overlap in eligibility of children and nonelderly adults for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Medicaid/Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) benefits in 2013, prior to Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. We find that over half of children eligible for one program were eligible for both, and nearly all of the remaining children were eligible for Medicaid/CHIP. A substantially smaller share of parents and nonparents were eligible for both SNAP and Medicaid/CHIP. The report also provides state-level estimates to allow calculation of state joint program participation rates. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wood, Michelle; Gubits, Daniel; Dastrup, Sam; Dunton, Lauren; Wulff, Carli
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Family Options Study, which is a random assignment study examining the impact of housing and services for homeless families in twelve communities across the United States. Topics covered include the study design, findings from the first 18 months, and the services needs of the families involved in the study.
    See fam more at:https://www.opressrc.org/content/workforce-innovation-and-opportunity-act-federal-interagency-coordination-state

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Family Options Study, which is a random assignment study examining the impact of housing and services for homeless families in twelve communities across the United States. Topics covered include the study design, findings from the first 18 months, and the services needs of the families involved in the study.
    See fam more at:https://www.opressrc.org/content/workforce-innovation-and-opportunity-act-federal-interagency-coordination-state

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2001 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations