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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Werner, Alan; Schwartz, Deena; Koralek, Robin; Loprest, Pamela; Sick, Nathan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This is the final report of the National Implementation Evaluation (NIE) of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG). In 2010, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded the first round of 5-year HPOG grants (HPOG 1.0) to 32 organizations in 23 states; five were tribal organizations. The purpose of the HPOG Program is to provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. HPOG 1.0 grantees designed and implemented programs to provide eligible participants with education, occupational training, and support and employment services to help them train for and find jobs in a variety of healthcare professions. (Author abstract) 

    This is the final report of the National Implementation Evaluation (NIE) of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG). In 2010, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded the first round of 5-year HPOG grants (HPOG 1.0) to 32 organizations in 23 states; five were tribal organizations. The purpose of the HPOG Program is to provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. HPOG 1.0 grantees designed and implemented programs to provide eligible participants with education, occupational training, and support and employment services to help them train for and find jobs in a variety of healthcare professions. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Werner, Alan; Koralek, Robin; Locke, Gretchen; Loprest, Pamela; Eyster, Lauren
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program is designed to deliver high-quality training in the health professions to eligible individuals. A National Evaluation of 27 grants awarded in 2015 as part of the second round of HPOG grants (HPOG 2.0) is currently underway. The National Evaluation will include a Descriptive Evaluation of the implementation, outcomes, and local service delivery systems of the grants as well as an Impact Evaluation of the grants’ impacts on participants and the HPOG Program’s costs and benefits.

    This report presents a research design plan for the Descriptive Evaluation, which includes three related studies:(i) the Implementation Study, (ii) the Outcome Study, and (iii) the Systems Study. Each of these studies makes important independent contributions to the National Evaluation:

    • The Implementation Study will describe HPOG 2.0 Program design and implementation, including Program context, administration, costs, education and support services, and employment assistance services.
    • The Outcome Study will describe HPOG 2.0...

    The Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program is designed to deliver high-quality training in the health professions to eligible individuals. A National Evaluation of 27 grants awarded in 2015 as part of the second round of HPOG grants (HPOG 2.0) is currently underway. The National Evaluation will include a Descriptive Evaluation of the implementation, outcomes, and local service delivery systems of the grants as well as an Impact Evaluation of the grants’ impacts on participants and the HPOG Program’s costs and benefits.

    This report presents a research design plan for the Descriptive Evaluation, which includes three related studies:(i) the Implementation Study, (ii) the Outcome Study, and (iii) the Systems Study. Each of these studies makes important independent contributions to the National Evaluation:

    • The Implementation Study will describe HPOG 2.0 Program design and implementation, including Program context, administration, costs, education and support services, and employment assistance services.
    • The Outcome Study will describe HPOG 2.0 participant characteristics, program experiences, and educational and employment outcomes.
    • The Systems Study will describe how local service delivery systems (i.e., community resources, funding availability, economic conditions, and policies) may have influenced HPOG program design and implementation and how HPOG implementation may have influenced these local systems. (Author abstract) 
  • Individual Author: Baird, Matthew D.; Bozick, Robert; Zaber, Melanie
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    While occupational credentials have been a part of any labor market at all times, significantly more attention has gone to estimating the returns to formal education. In this paper, we evaluate a new module of the Current Population Survey which asks questions on the certificate and license statuses of respondents. Using an instrumental variables approach, we evaluate the impact of these credentials on employment status, and then perform a decomposition on the effect of these on earnings, both at the intensive margin (higher wages conditional on working) and the extensive margin (higher likelihood of being employed, and thus receiving a wage). We document several key findings, and show how the returns differ across various worker characteristics, including bachelor’s degree holders and above versus those with fewer years of education, reinforcing the narrative of the role that these credentials can play in both developing human capital and signaling to potential employers quality. (Author abstract)

    While occupational credentials have been a part of any labor market at all times, significantly more attention has gone to estimating the returns to formal education. In this paper, we evaluate a new module of the Current Population Survey which asks questions on the certificate and license statuses of respondents. Using an instrumental variables approach, we evaluate the impact of these credentials on employment status, and then perform a decomposition on the effect of these on earnings, both at the intensive margin (higher wages conditional on working) and the extensive margin (higher likelihood of being employed, and thus receiving a wage). We document several key findings, and show how the returns differ across various worker characteristics, including bachelor’s degree holders and above versus those with fewer years of education, reinforcing the narrative of the role that these credentials can play in both developing human capital and signaling to potential employers quality. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mikelson, Kelly S.; Damron, Neil; Loprest, Pamela
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report describes the first year of the second round of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants Program (“HPOG 2.0”). HPOG 2.0 provides education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for healthcare occupations that pay well and are in high demand. The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded this second round of five-year grants in 2015. The first round of five-year grants was awarded in 2010. HPOG 2.0 grants were made to 32 grantees across 21 states, including five tribal organizations. In the first year of the HPOG 2.0 Program, the grantees enrolled over 5,000 participants. (Author abstract)

    This report describes the first year of the second round of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants Program (“HPOG 2.0”). HPOG 2.0 provides education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for healthcare occupations that pay well and are in high demand. The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded this second round of five-year grants in 2015. The first round of five-year grants was awarded in 2010. HPOG 2.0 grants were made to 32 grantees across 21 states, including five tribal organizations. In the first year of the HPOG 2.0 Program, the grantees enrolled over 5,000 participants. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Meit, Michael; Hafford, Carol; Fromknecht, Catherine; Phillips, Emily; Miesfeld, Noelle; Nadel, Tori
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program is administered by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. In September 2015, ACF awarded a second round of HPOG grants to 32 organizations, including five tribal organizations. These grant awards support demonstration projects that provide eligible individuals with the opportunity to obtain education and training for occupations in the health care field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand.

    NORC at the University of Chicago is leading a comprehensive implementation and outcome evaluation of the five Tribal HPOG 2.0 grantees. The evaluation examines program implementation and participant outcomes at both the individual and systems level in a manner that is grounded in a community-based participatory research approach. The Tribal HPOG 2.0 evaluation design is descriptive; as such, the results will not attribute causality between HPOG programs and outcomes. (Author abstract)

    The Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program is administered by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. In September 2015, ACF awarded a second round of HPOG grants to 32 organizations, including five tribal organizations. These grant awards support demonstration projects that provide eligible individuals with the opportunity to obtain education and training for occupations in the health care field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand.

    NORC at the University of Chicago is leading a comprehensive implementation and outcome evaluation of the five Tribal HPOG 2.0 grantees. The evaluation examines program implementation and participant outcomes at both the individual and systems level in a manner that is grounded in a community-based participatory research approach. The Tribal HPOG 2.0 evaluation design is descriptive; as such, the results will not attribute causality between HPOG programs and outcomes. (Author abstract)

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