Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Wise, Julia; Hauke, Christi; Campbell, Tara
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This presentation from the Community Action Partnership 2017 Annual Convention discusses the importance of a two-generation community action approach that addresses the needs of both children and parents.

    This presentation from the Community Action Partnership 2017 Annual Convention discusses the importance of a two-generation community action approach that addresses the needs of both children and parents.

  • Individual Author: Papageorge, Nicholas W.; Thom, Kevin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Recent advances have led to the discovery of specific genetic variants that predict educational attainment. We study how these variants, summarized as a genetic score variable, are associated with human capital accumulation and labor market outcomes in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). We demonstrate that the same genetic score that predicts education is also associated with higher wages, but only among individuals with a college education. Moreover, the genetic gradient in wages has grown in more recent birth cohorts, consistent with interactions between technological change and labor market ability. We also show that individuals who grew up in economically disadvantaged households are less likely to go to college when compared to individuals with the same genetic score, but from higher socioeconomic status households. Our findings provide support for the idea that childhood socioeconomic status is an important moderator of the economic returns to genetic endowments. Moreover, the finding that childhood poverty limits the educational attainment of high-ability individuals...

    Recent advances have led to the discovery of specific genetic variants that predict educational attainment. We study how these variants, summarized as a genetic score variable, are associated with human capital accumulation and labor market outcomes in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). We demonstrate that the same genetic score that predicts education is also associated with higher wages, but only among individuals with a college education. Moreover, the genetic gradient in wages has grown in more recent birth cohorts, consistent with interactions between technological change and labor market ability. We also show that individuals who grew up in economically disadvantaged households are less likely to go to college when compared to individuals with the same genetic score, but from higher socioeconomic status households. Our findings provide support for the idea that childhood socioeconomic status is an important moderator of the economic returns to genetic endowments. Moreover, the finding that childhood poverty limits the educational attainment of high-ability individuals suggests the existence of unrealized human potential. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Smith, Sheila; Granja, Maribel R.; Nguyen, Sophie (Uyen)
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Young children whose families face economic hardship are more likely than their peers in financially secure families to experience a range of adversities that may greatly limit their opportunities for success as adults. Parents of these children show a higher prevalence of health and mental health problems and often reside in communities where they do not feel safe or supported. Young children in poverty have higher rates of chronic health conditions such as asthma and diabetes, and a greater incidence of developmental delays, learning difficulties, and behavior problems. Poverty’s harmful effects even extend to changes in parts of the brain that govern language, memory, and behavioral control — capacities that are critical for school success. (Author introduction)

     

    Young children whose families face economic hardship are more likely than their peers in financially secure families to experience a range of adversities that may greatly limit their opportunities for success as adults. Parents of these children show a higher prevalence of health and mental health problems and often reside in communities where they do not feel safe or supported. Young children in poverty have higher rates of chronic health conditions such as asthma and diabetes, and a greater incidence of developmental delays, learning difficulties, and behavior problems. Poverty’s harmful effects even extend to changes in parts of the brain that govern language, memory, and behavioral control — capacities that are critical for school success. (Author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Cho, Junhan; Terris, Darcey D.; Glisson, Rachael E.; Bae, Dayoung; Brown, Anita
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    The present study investigated the influence of multi-level determinants on home visiting participation outcomes. Home visiting participation was assessed by: (1) duration of participation (i.e., retention); (2) number of home visits completed (i.e., dosage), and (3) number of home visits completed divided by the duration of participation (i.e., intensity). The sample consisted of 1024 mothers (mean age 22.89 years) who participated in home visiting funded through Georgia’s Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program. Using hierarchical linear modeling, we investigated both family- and community-level characteristics associated with participation outcomes. Mothers (primary caregivers) were less likely to be retained in the program and more likely to have received fewer visits if they were not living with a main romantic partner or if their household incomes were below poverty level. The mothers were more likely to be actively engaged if their primary language was not English or if their child was relatively younger at enrollment. At the community level,...

    The present study investigated the influence of multi-level determinants on home visiting participation outcomes. Home visiting participation was assessed by: (1) duration of participation (i.e., retention); (2) number of home visits completed (i.e., dosage), and (3) number of home visits completed divided by the duration of participation (i.e., intensity). The sample consisted of 1024 mothers (mean age 22.89 years) who participated in home visiting funded through Georgia’s Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program. Using hierarchical linear modeling, we investigated both family- and community-level characteristics associated with participation outcomes. Mothers (primary caregivers) were less likely to be retained in the program and more likely to have received fewer visits if they were not living with a main romantic partner or if their household incomes were below poverty level. The mothers were more likely to be actively engaged if their primary language was not English or if their child was relatively younger at enrollment. At the community level, after controlling family characteristics, living in a disadvantaged community (characterized by economic deprivation and elevated child health/safety risks) was associated with shorter and less intense program participation. These findings demonstrate that barriers to active engagement in home visiting programs persisted at multiple ecological levels. Explicitly considering the complexity of the communities in which home visiting programs are implemented may allow for more equitable allocations and expectations in future funding and performance measurement.(Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Hernandez, Donald J. ; Napierala, Jeffrey S.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Mother’s Education and Children’s Outcomes: How Dual-Generation Programs Offer Increased Opportunities for America’s Children is the second in a series of the Foundation for Child Development’s Disparities Among America’s Children reports.

    It offers the first-ever analysis of economic, education, and health indicators for children whose mothers have not graduated from high school, compared to children whose mothers have higher levels of education.One in every eight children in the U.S. lives with a mother who has not graduated from high school. These children experience especially large disparities compared to children whose mothers have a bachelor degree. Key findings include the following: Disparities separating children whose  (1)   mothers had not graduated from high school, compared to those whose (2)   mothers had a bachelor degree were, respectively: 

    • 53 vs. 4 percent for the official federal poverty rate
    • 84 vs. 13 percent for the low-income rate (family income below twice the official federal poverty threshold)
    • $25,000 vs...

    Mother’s Education and Children’s Outcomes: How Dual-Generation Programs Offer Increased Opportunities for America’s Children is the second in a series of the Foundation for Child Development’s Disparities Among America’s Children reports.

    It offers the first-ever analysis of economic, education, and health indicators for children whose mothers have not graduated from high school, compared to children whose mothers have higher levels of education.One in every eight children in the U.S. lives with a mother who has not graduated from high school. These children experience especially large disparities compared to children whose mothers have a bachelor degree. Key findings include the following: Disparities separating children whose  (1)   mothers had not graduated from high school, compared to those whose (2)   mothers had a bachelor degree were, respectively: 

    • 53 vs. 4 percent for the official federal poverty rate
    • 84 vs. 13 percent for the low-income rate (family income below twice the official federal poverty threshold)
    • $25,000 vs. $106,500 for median family income
    • 16 vs. 49 percent for reading proficiently (at grade level) in Eighth Grade
    • 16 vs. 52 percent for proficiency in mathematics (at grade level) in Eighth Grade

    The enormous disparities in well-being identified point toward the value and need for comprehensive Dual-Generation strategies that offer high-quality PreK-3rd education for children, effective job training for parents that leads directly to well-paid work, and additional public services — such as health, nutrition, food, and housing — which enable low-income families to overcome barriers to success. Mother’s Education and Children’s Outcomes identifies federal, state, and local policy solutions to reduce these disparities. (author introduction)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2001 to 2017

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations