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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Greenfield, Jennifer C.; Reichman, Nancy; Cole, Paula M.; Galgiani, Hannah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    Colorado is poised this year to consider passing a comprehensive paid family and medical leave measure. Despite several unsuccessful attempts in recent years, changes in the state legislature and in voter sentiment point to building momentum in support of the policy. Passing it would make Colorado the seventh state in the U.S., plus the District of Columbia, to pass a statewide initiative. Drawing from data about similar programs in other states, this report examines what a comprehensive paid family and medical leave initiative might look like in Colorado. Specifically, we estimate that approximately 5% of eligible workers per year are likely to access leave benefits under the new program, with an average weekly benefit of about $671. To fund the program, workers and private-sector employers will each need to contribute about .34% of wages each year. At this premium rate, the program will be able to fully fund a wage replacement scheme that matches or comes close to matching wages of the lowest earners, with a maximum weekly benefit cap of either $1000 or $1200/week. Overall, the...

    Colorado is poised this year to consider passing a comprehensive paid family and medical leave measure. Despite several unsuccessful attempts in recent years, changes in the state legislature and in voter sentiment point to building momentum in support of the policy. Passing it would make Colorado the seventh state in the U.S., plus the District of Columbia, to pass a statewide initiative. Drawing from data about similar programs in other states, this report examines what a comprehensive paid family and medical leave initiative might look like in Colorado. Specifically, we estimate that approximately 5% of eligible workers per year are likely to access leave benefits under the new program, with an average weekly benefit of about $671. To fund the program, workers and private-sector employers will each need to contribute about .34% of wages each year. At this premium rate, the program will be able to fully fund a wage replacement scheme that matches or comes close to matching wages of the lowest earners, with a maximum weekly benefit cap of either $1000 or $1200/week. Overall, the program seems feasible and is likely to bring a number of important benefits to workers and employers across the state, in exchange for a modest investment in the form of premium contributions. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ziliak, James P.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This aim of this paper is to assess the economic status of rural people five decades after publication of President Johnson's National Commission on Rural Poverty report The People Left Behind. Using data from the Annual Social and Economic Supplement of the CPS, along with county data from the Regional Economic Information System, I focus on how changes in employment, wages, and the social safety net have influenced the evolution of poverty and inequality in rural and urban places. The evidence shows that large numbers of rural Americans are disengaged from the labor market, gains in human capital attainment have stagnated, and the retreat from marriage continues for the medium- and less-skilled individuals. However, the social safety net has been more effective in redistributing income within rural areas than in urban centers. Work, education, and marriage are the three main pathways out of poverty for most Americans, whether residing in urban or rural locales, and thus making progress against poverty and inequality faces major economic and demographic headwinds. (Author...

    This aim of this paper is to assess the economic status of rural people five decades after publication of President Johnson's National Commission on Rural Poverty report The People Left Behind. Using data from the Annual Social and Economic Supplement of the CPS, along with county data from the Regional Economic Information System, I focus on how changes in employment, wages, and the social safety net have influenced the evolution of poverty and inequality in rural and urban places. The evidence shows that large numbers of rural Americans are disengaged from the labor market, gains in human capital attainment have stagnated, and the retreat from marriage continues for the medium- and less-skilled individuals. However, the social safety net has been more effective in redistributing income within rural areas than in urban centers. Work, education, and marriage are the three main pathways out of poverty for most Americans, whether residing in urban or rural locales, and thus making progress against poverty and inequality faces major economic and demographic headwinds. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: United States Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    America changed when the Americans with Disability Act was signed into law over twenty-four years ago. In 1990, the civil rights of people with disabilities that were fought for by disability advocates and their allies became the law of the land.

    With the passage of the ADA, people with disabilities were guaranteed the right to equal access to employment, state and local government services, commercial facilities and businesses, transportation, and telecommunications. This meant, for the first time in the history of the United States, that those with physical, mental, intellectual, sensory, and chronic health disabilities had the right to be able to enter a local courthouse, to be able to cross the street, to be able to attend a movie or baseball game, to be able to dine in a local restaurant, or to be considered for employment based on their skills and knowledge rather than to be dismissed from consideration because of their disability…

    However, for many of those with disabilities, two areas of American life have been stubbornly resistant to change: employment and...

    America changed when the Americans with Disability Act was signed into law over twenty-four years ago. In 1990, the civil rights of people with disabilities that were fought for by disability advocates and their allies became the law of the land.

    With the passage of the ADA, people with disabilities were guaranteed the right to equal access to employment, state and local government services, commercial facilities and businesses, transportation, and telecommunications. This meant, for the first time in the history of the United States, that those with physical, mental, intellectual, sensory, and chronic health disabilities had the right to be able to enter a local courthouse, to be able to cross the street, to be able to attend a movie or baseball game, to be able to dine in a local restaurant, or to be considered for employment based on their skills and knowledge rather than to be dismissed from consideration because of their disability…

    However, for many of those with disabilities, two areas of American life have been stubbornly resistant to change: employment and participation in the middle class. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Vericker, Tracy; Isaacs, Julia; Hahn, Heather; Toran, Katherine; Rennane, Stephanie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This report provides a first-time analysis of how the allocation of public resources for children varies by family income. Examining federal expenditures for nearly 100 federal programs in 2009, the report finds that 70 percent of all federal spending on children served the 42 percent of children who are low-income -- living in families with incomes less than twice the federal poverty level. While low-income children received 84 percent of outlays on children, higher-income children received 82 percent of tax reductions benefiting children. (author abstract)

    This report provides a first-time analysis of how the allocation of public resources for children varies by family income. Examining federal expenditures for nearly 100 federal programs in 2009, the report finds that 70 percent of all federal spending on children served the 42 percent of children who are low-income -- living in families with incomes less than twice the federal poverty level. While low-income children received 84 percent of outlays on children, higher-income children received 82 percent of tax reductions benefiting children. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mills, Gregory B.; Zhang, Sisi
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    For households headed by persons with disabilities, savings can provide near-term protection against hardship. Analysis of longitudinal data from the 2001 panel of the Survey of Income and Program Participation indicates that households with $2,000 or more in liquid assets (interest-earning assets held at financial institutions) are better able to avoid subsequent hardships such as forgone doctor visits and missed utility payments, compared to those with smaller (or no) asset holdings. This evidence has implications for possible increases in the resource limits for the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, now $2,000 for individuals and $3,000 for couples. (author abstract)

    For households headed by persons with disabilities, savings can provide near-term protection against hardship. Analysis of longitudinal data from the 2001 panel of the Survey of Income and Program Participation indicates that households with $2,000 or more in liquid assets (interest-earning assets held at financial institutions) are better able to avoid subsequent hardships such as forgone doctor visits and missed utility payments, compared to those with smaller (or no) asset holdings. This evidence has implications for possible increases in the resource limits for the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, now $2,000 for individuals and $3,000 for couples. (author abstract)

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