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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Carson, Jessica A.; Mattingly, Marybeth J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    In this brief, we use interview and focus group data to describe some of the ways that restricted rural housing stock affects working families in two rural New England counties, and explore solutions proposed by rural residents and experts to make housing affordable (see Box 1 on page 2). Rural amenities and scenery make residence in certain New England regions desirable for second-home owners, vacationers, and retirees. However, the use of housing for these purposes, combined with efforts to conserve acreage and preserve scenery, serves to diminish the supply of housing, making it unaffordable for many low- and moderate-income residents. Moreover, the housing that is available varies in quality, and regional nonprofit and federal housing assistance programs lack the capacity to meet all residents' needs. (Author abstract)

    This report was also published as an Issue Brief at the Carsey Institute for Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire.

    In this brief, we use interview and focus group data to describe some of the ways that restricted rural housing stock affects working families in two rural New England counties, and explore solutions proposed by rural residents and experts to make housing affordable (see Box 1 on page 2). Rural amenities and scenery make residence in certain New England regions desirable for second-home owners, vacationers, and retirees. However, the use of housing for these purposes, combined with efforts to conserve acreage and preserve scenery, serves to diminish the supply of housing, making it unaffordable for many low- and moderate-income residents. Moreover, the housing that is available varies in quality, and regional nonprofit and federal housing assistance programs lack the capacity to meet all residents' needs. (Author abstract)

    This report was also published as an Issue Brief at the Carsey Institute for Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire.

  • Individual Author: Levy, Diane K. ; Edmonds, Leiha; Simington, Jasmine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This brief presents information on work requirement policies implemented by public housing agencies and estimates the percent of households affected by the requirements. Noting the lack of evidence on the outcomes and effects of work requirements on households’ employment and income and on the agencies’ implementation costs, it closes with questions to guide future research and policy considerations. (Author abstract) 

    This brief presents information on work requirement policies implemented by public housing agencies and estimates the percent of households affected by the requirements. Noting the lack of evidence on the outcomes and effects of work requirements on households’ employment and income and on the agencies’ implementation costs, it closes with questions to guide future research and policy considerations. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Goodman, Laurie S.; Mayer, Christopher
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    We take a detailed look at US homeownership from three different perspectives: 1) an international perspective, comparing US homeownership rates with those of other nations; 2) a demographic perspective, examining the correlation between changes in the US homeownership rate between 1985 and 2015 and factors like age, race/ethnicity, education, family status, and income; 3) and, a financial benefits perspective, which compares the internal rate of return to homeownership to other investments. Our overall conclusion: homeownership is a valuable institution. While two past policies may have put too much faith in the benefits of homeownership, the pendulum seems to have swung too far the other way, and many now may have too little faith in homeownership as part of the American Dream. (Author abstract) 

    We take a detailed look at US homeownership from three different perspectives: 1) an international perspective, comparing US homeownership rates with those of other nations; 2) a demographic perspective, examining the correlation between changes in the US homeownership rate between 1985 and 2015 and factors like age, race/ethnicity, education, family status, and income; 3) and, a financial benefits perspective, which compares the internal rate of return to homeownership to other investments. Our overall conclusion: homeownership is a valuable institution. While two past policies may have put too much faith in the benefits of homeownership, the pendulum seems to have swung too far the other way, and many now may have too little faith in homeownership as part of the American Dream. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Helms, Veronica E.; Steffen, Barry L.; Rudd, Elizabeth C.; Sperling, Jon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the National Center for Health Statistics agreed in 2011 to link administrative records for individuals receiving housing assistance from HUD with records from the National Health Interview Survey. This report uses the linked data for 2006 through 2012 to present nationally representative estimates of demographic characteristics, health diagnoses and conditions, and health care access and utilization for HUD-assisted children ages 0–17. To provide context, similar estimates are provided for two other relevant subgroups: children residing in unassisted renter households with incomes below the federal poverty line and all children in the U.S. population. The report presents raw prevalence estimates to reflect actual conditions for each subgroup, and does not make statistical adjustments for age or other factors to support cross-group comparison of health conditions for similar individuals. Results demonstrate that assisted children suffer disproportionately from serious health conditions. (Author abstract)

     

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the National Center for Health Statistics agreed in 2011 to link administrative records for individuals receiving housing assistance from HUD with records from the National Health Interview Survey. This report uses the linked data for 2006 through 2012 to present nationally representative estimates of demographic characteristics, health diagnoses and conditions, and health care access and utilization for HUD-assisted children ages 0–17. To provide context, similar estimates are provided for two other relevant subgroups: children residing in unassisted renter households with incomes below the federal poverty line and all children in the U.S. population. The report presents raw prevalence estimates to reflect actual conditions for each subgroup, and does not make statistical adjustments for age or other factors to support cross-group comparison of health conditions for similar individuals. Results demonstrate that assisted children suffer disproportionately from serious health conditions. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Office of Policy Development and Research; U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This report summarizes data received from the state housing finance agencies (HFAs) that administer the Low Income Housing Tax Credit. The HFAs are required by the Housing and Economic Recovery Act (HERA) of 2008 to submit certain demographic and economic information on tenants in LIHTC units to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). HERA specifically requires HFAs to submit to HUD information concerning race, ethnicity, family composition, age, income, use of rental assistance, disability status, and monthly rental payments of households residing in LIHTC properties. The report summarizes the required data. (Author abstract)

     

    This report summarizes data received from the state housing finance agencies (HFAs) that administer the Low Income Housing Tax Credit. The HFAs are required by the Housing and Economic Recovery Act (HERA) of 2008 to submit certain demographic and economic information on tenants in LIHTC units to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). HERA specifically requires HFAs to submit to HUD information concerning race, ethnicity, family composition, age, income, use of rental assistance, disability status, and monthly rental payments of households residing in LIHTC properties. The report summarizes the required data. (Author abstract)

     

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