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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Sherman, Erin ; Secrist, Amy; Gidwani, Suman; Storey, Douglas; Leifer, Jess
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    Motivation: Baltimore City experiences one of the highest infant mortality rates in the country. Although a large percentage of pregnant women in Baltimore are Medicaid recipients, they often do not take-up pregnancy and postpartum support services that are available with an appropriate referral. Particularly for high-risk pregnancies, this can lead to adverse birth outcomes. To begin accessing these services, Medicaid-eligible patients must have a prenatal risk assessment (PRA) form filled out by their provider. Without this form, women with high risk pregnancies may not be referred to services such as insurance assistance, WIC, home visits by social workers, and smoking cessation assistance. Intervention: In collaboration with the Baltimore City Health Department (BCHD), the Johns Hopkins University Center for Communication Programs (CCP) and other partners in the B’more for Healthy Babies (BHB) initiative, a package of behavioral interventions was randomized across prenatal care practices in Baltimore. The set of interventions included the...

    Motivation: Baltimore City experiences one of the highest infant mortality rates in the country. Although a large percentage of pregnant women in Baltimore are Medicaid recipients, they often do not take-up pregnancy and postpartum support services that are available with an appropriate referral. Particularly for high-risk pregnancies, this can lead to adverse birth outcomes. To begin accessing these services, Medicaid-eligible patients must have a prenatal risk assessment (PRA) form filled out by their provider. Without this form, women with high risk pregnancies may not be referred to services such as insurance assistance, WIC, home visits by social workers, and smoking cessation assistance. Intervention: In collaboration with the Baltimore City Health Department (BCHD), the Johns Hopkins University Center for Communication Programs (CCP) and other partners in the B’more for Healthy Babies (BHB) initiative, a package of behavioral interventions was randomized across prenatal care practices in Baltimore. The set of interventions included the following components: 

    • Checklist: The PRA Checklist includes execution notes for the 3 steps required to successfully complete a PRA: talking points for speaking to a patient about the PRA, steps and specific filling number for the PRA, and fax number for faxing the PRA.
    • Feedback: Three quarterly feedback reports were used to compare how many PRAs an office completed in comparison to offices like it. They provided a visual image (smiley face or exclamation point) to indicate whether the office was doing better or worse than its peers. Additionally, practices who had not submitted any PRAs in the previous year received a report indicating that they need to submit PRAs to appropriately serve their patients.
    • Testimonials: Patient testimonials included quotes from mothers who had benefitted from services referred through the PRA. They highlighted stories of mothers and babies with positive health outcomes as a result of services like home visiting and cribs. Testimonials will be sent to all treatment offices via email at intervals of 1-2 months.
    • Information: A website was developed which provides a quiz that allows clinics to see how many of the standard PRA procedures they are/are not following. The website also has a list of behaviorally informed best practices that we developed based on site visits and advice from BHB/BCHD.

    Methodology: Data collection will occur between March-September 2018 with the primary outcome being the number of PRAs submitted by each practice. Cluster randomization is used to identify effects in 25 control clinics compared to 27 treatment clinics throughout the city. Results: The results, available by September 2018, will show whether this combination of peer comparison and informational interventions can impact providers’ PRA submission rates, referral rates to prenatal and postpartum support services, and the rate of accepted services by Medicaid-eligible women. Conclusion: The results of this experiment will determine whether social and informational efforts impact PRA take-up and increase support-service access for pregnant Medicaid-eligible women in Baltimore. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Spillman, Brenda C.; Clemans-Cope, Lisa; Mallik-Kane, Kamala; Hayes, Emily
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Many states have expanded Medicaid eligibility to reach a wider array of vulnerable and historically uninsured populations. While Medicaid cannot pay for medical services provided in prisons or jails, people who are arrested and incarcerated can enroll in Medicaid and become eligible for benefits in the community. Given the high prevalence of mental health issues, substance abuse, and chronic health conditions among criminal justice populations, providing health care services to them could improve public health and public safety outcomes. This brief highlights initiatives in New York and Rhode Island that use the Medicaid health home model to improve continuity of care for justice-involved individuals. (Author abstract)

    Many states have expanded Medicaid eligibility to reach a wider array of vulnerable and historically uninsured populations. While Medicaid cannot pay for medical services provided in prisons or jails, people who are arrested and incarcerated can enroll in Medicaid and become eligible for benefits in the community. Given the high prevalence of mental health issues, substance abuse, and chronic health conditions among criminal justice populations, providing health care services to them could improve public health and public safety outcomes. This brief highlights initiatives in New York and Rhode Island that use the Medicaid health home model to improve continuity of care for justice-involved individuals. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2015

    Children living in poverty are more likely to have mental health problems, and their conditions are more likely to be severe. Of the approximately 1.3 million children who were recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability benefits in 2013, about 50% were disabled primarily due to a mental disorder. An increase in the number of children who are recipients of SSI benefits due to mental disorders has been observed through several decades of the program beginning in 1985 and continuing through 2010. Nevertheless, less than 1% of children in the United States are recipients of SSI disability benefits for a mental disorder. (Author introduction)

    Children living in poverty are more likely to have mental health problems, and their conditions are more likely to be severe. Of the approximately 1.3 million children who were recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability benefits in 2013, about 50% were disabled primarily due to a mental disorder. An increase in the number of children who are recipients of SSI benefits due to mental disorders has been observed through several decades of the program beginning in 1985 and continuing through 2010. Nevertheless, less than 1% of children in the United States are recipients of SSI disability benefits for a mental disorder. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Wishner, Jane B.; Spencer, Anna C.; Wengle, Erik
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This paper analyzes two pairs of states—North Carolina and South Carolina, and Wisconsin and Ohio—that achieved very different enrollment rates in the federally facilitated Marketplace (FFM) during the 2014 open enrollment period; North Carolina and Wisconsin exceeded enrollment projections, while South Carolina and Ohio fell short of FFM averages. Demographics, uninsurance rates and FFM premium rates did not appear to explain the significant enrollment differences. Intense anti-Affordable Care Act environments in the two states that did less well, however, and a coordinated coalition of diverse stakeholders in the states that performed better did appear to improve FFM enrollment outcomes. (author abstract)

    This paper analyzes two pairs of states—North Carolina and South Carolina, and Wisconsin and Ohio—that achieved very different enrollment rates in the federally facilitated Marketplace (FFM) during the 2014 open enrollment period; North Carolina and Wisconsin exceeded enrollment projections, while South Carolina and Ohio fell short of FFM averages. Demographics, uninsurance rates and FFM premium rates did not appear to explain the significant enrollment differences. Intense anti-Affordable Care Act environments in the two states that did less well, however, and a coordinated coalition of diverse stakeholders in the states that performed better did appear to improve FFM enrollment outcomes. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ku, Leighton; Ferguson, Christine
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2011

    This report briefly reviews the evidence about the effectiveness of Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) in addressing the health and financial needs of vulnerable Americans, including children and other vulnerable populations, including low-income parents, pregnant women, seniors and people with disabilities. The importance of Medicaid and CHIP to low-income children and adults is well understood; less evident is the extent to which Medicaid and CHIP protect populations with serious health problems. Children covered by Medicaid or CHIP are more likely than their privately-insured counterparts to be in poorer health status and to have serious health conditions, as are publicly-insured adults. Almost all elderly Americans are covered by Medicare, but low-income seniors who are also enrolled in Medicaid (sometimes called dual eligibles) tend to have substantially worse health than those with Medicare alone or with private coverage. The benefit structure of Medicaid is particularly designed to help address the serious health needs and low incomes of its...

    This report briefly reviews the evidence about the effectiveness of Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) in addressing the health and financial needs of vulnerable Americans, including children and other vulnerable populations, including low-income parents, pregnant women, seniors and people with disabilities. The importance of Medicaid and CHIP to low-income children and adults is well understood; less evident is the extent to which Medicaid and CHIP protect populations with serious health problems. Children covered by Medicaid or CHIP are more likely than their privately-insured counterparts to be in poorer health status and to have serious health conditions, as are publicly-insured adults. Almost all elderly Americans are covered by Medicare, but low-income seniors who are also enrolled in Medicaid (sometimes called dual eligibles) tend to have substantially worse health than those with Medicare alone or with private coverage. The benefit structure of Medicaid is particularly designed to help address the serious health needs and low incomes of its beneficiaries. Children covered by Medicaid have comprehensive services under its Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment policies.(author abstract)

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