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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Elkin, Sam; Farrell, Mary; Koralek, Robin; Engle, Hannah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Since 1975, the United States has resettled more than three million refugees whose diversity of skills, education, and culture requires that public and private organizations assisting them be able to provide a wide range of services. Upon arrival in the United States, two federally funded cash assistance programs help low-income refugees on their path to self-sufficiency: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) for those with dependent minor children and Refugee Cash Assistance (RCA) for those who do not qualify for TANF. Both programs are funded and administered by the Administration for Children and Families within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. States, however, have broad flexibility in implementing TANF and RCA programs and the related employment services, and as a result programs vary by state.

    While refugees make up a small proportion of the TANF caseload, they may require more intensive services reflecting their status and particular needs. Coordination with resettlement agencies and refugee-serving organizations more accustomed to working...

    Since 1975, the United States has resettled more than three million refugees whose diversity of skills, education, and culture requires that public and private organizations assisting them be able to provide a wide range of services. Upon arrival in the United States, two federally funded cash assistance programs help low-income refugees on their path to self-sufficiency: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) for those with dependent minor children and Refugee Cash Assistance (RCA) for those who do not qualify for TANF. Both programs are funded and administered by the Administration for Children and Families within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. States, however, have broad flexibility in implementing TANF and RCA programs and the related employment services, and as a result programs vary by state.

    While refugees make up a small proportion of the TANF caseload, they may require more intensive services reflecting their status and particular needs. Coordination with resettlement agencies and refugee-serving organizations more accustomed to working with refugees may ensure appropriate services are provided. Research on how refugee-serving programs collaborate to provide assistance and help refugees obtain employment has been limited. Service providers seeking to help refugees achieve self-sufficiency in a short time-frame need promising strategies for better serving refugees. (Author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Edin, Kathryn; Seefeldt, Kristin; Dutta-Gupta, Indivar ; Greenberg, Mark; Simms, Margaret; Cancian, Maria
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) includes the opening remarks and first plenary session on the second day of the conference. Plenary panelists included academics, researchers, and policymakers. The discussion centered around what is known about Americans living in deep poverty.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) includes the opening remarks and first plenary session on the second day of the conference. Plenary panelists included academics, researchers, and policymakers. The discussion centered around what is known about Americans living in deep poverty.

  • Individual Author: Haskins, Ron; Albert, Vicky; Howard, Kimberly
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    The question addressed by this report is how the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program responded to increased unemployment during the Great Recession. Enacted in 1996, the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program replaced the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program, changing the culture of cash welfare by imposing strong work requirements backed by sanctions and a five-year time limit on benefit receipt. In response, the rolls declined in record numbers, both because people left the rolls, most of them for work, and because fewer people entered welfare. Between 1995 and 2000, welfare rolls declined by more than 55 percent nationwide, while poverty among children in single parent families and among black children, both of which groups were disproportionately represented on the TANF rolls, fell to their lowest levels ever.

    However, during the Great Recession that officially lasted from December 2007 to June 2009, as unemployment skyrocketed, TANF performance as part of the safety net was held by many advocates, policymakers, and...

    The question addressed by this report is how the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program responded to increased unemployment during the Great Recession. Enacted in 1996, the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program replaced the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program, changing the culture of cash welfare by imposing strong work requirements backed by sanctions and a five-year time limit on benefit receipt. In response, the rolls declined in record numbers, both because people left the rolls, most of them for work, and because fewer people entered welfare. Between 1995 and 2000, welfare rolls declined by more than 55 percent nationwide, while poverty among children in single parent families and among black children, both of which groups were disproportionately represented on the TANF rolls, fell to their lowest levels ever.

    However, during the Great Recession that officially lasted from December 2007 to June 2009, as unemployment skyrocketed, TANF performance as part of the safety net was held by many advocates, policymakers, and researchers to be inadequate. This report analyses this claim from a variety of perspectives. In the three studies report here, we examine changes in the TANF rolls in relation to two alternative measures of rising unemployment in each state and in relation to how the AFDC program responded during previous recessions. We show that the increase in the TANF rolls was greater—12 and 30 percent greater under two different methods—when examined during the unique period of rising employment in each state. We also show that TANF increased more in the recession of 2001 and the Great Recession of 2007-2009 than AFDC did during previous recessions. We also show, as have a number of other researchers, that the nation’s safety net as a whole performed well during the Great Recession and prevented millions of people from falling into poverty. (Edited author executive summary)

  • Individual Author: Bono, Michael; Toros, Halil
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    On January 4, 2005, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors requested that DPSS provide more information on homeless CalWORKs families. In response to this request, DPSS developed a two-pronged strategy, in collaboration with the Service Integration Branch of the Los Angeles County Chief Administrative Office: (1) a detailed analysis of administrative data for all families who received CalWORKs in Los Angeles County between September and November 2004; and (2) a survey of 373 CalWORKs participants who applied for special assistance for homelessness during the week of February 22 through February 28, 2005.

    The identification of homeless families is a complex issue. Unlike the recent effort by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) to observe and count homeless persons in our communities, DPSS relies on a participant’s self-disclosure of homelessness to a worker to identify a family as homeless and respond to a family’s housing crisis with special assistance.

    PART I of this report describes findings from analyses of the administrative caseload data,...

    On January 4, 2005, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors requested that DPSS provide more information on homeless CalWORKs families. In response to this request, DPSS developed a two-pronged strategy, in collaboration with the Service Integration Branch of the Los Angeles County Chief Administrative Office: (1) a detailed analysis of administrative data for all families who received CalWORKs in Los Angeles County between September and November 2004; and (2) a survey of 373 CalWORKs participants who applied for special assistance for homelessness during the week of February 22 through February 28, 2005.

    The identification of homeless families is a complex issue. Unlike the recent effort by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) to observe and count homeless persons in our communities, DPSS relies on a participant’s self-disclosure of homelessness to a worker to identify a family as homeless and respond to a family’s housing crisis with special assistance.

    PART I of this report describes findings from analyses of the administrative caseload data, and PART II describes results from the participant survey. Taken together, this data presents the most detailed information ever compiled regarding CalWORKs homeless families in Los Angeles County. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ovwigho, Pamela C.; Born, Catherine E.; Ferrero, Ann; Palazzo, Correne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2004

    The truth is that neither the nation nor individual states possess data descriptive of today’s active TANF caseload that is adequate to the critical task at hand: making program and policy decisions for the next few years that are consistent with and responsive to the circumstances and needs of today’s cash assistance clients. Absent this type of data, state and federal policy-makers will be hard-pressed to make the correct choices. Moreover, the consequences of poor decisions could be severe given the recent economic downturn, the up-ticks in welfare caseloads that have been observed in many states, and time limits on receipt of federally-funded cash assistance.

    In response to a solicitation issued by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, five states and the District of Columbia received financial support to examine and report on the characteristics and circumstances of their current cash assistance caseloads. Within this framework, the goal of our project is to answer two questions that are...

    The truth is that neither the nation nor individual states possess data descriptive of today’s active TANF caseload that is adequate to the critical task at hand: making program and policy decisions for the next few years that are consistent with and responsive to the circumstances and needs of today’s cash assistance clients. Absent this type of data, state and federal policy-makers will be hard-pressed to make the correct choices. Moreover, the consequences of poor decisions could be severe given the recent economic downturn, the up-ticks in welfare caseloads that have been observed in many states, and time limits on receipt of federally-funded cash assistance.

    In response to a solicitation issued by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, five states and the District of Columbia received financial support to examine and report on the characteristics and circumstances of their current cash assistance caseloads. Within this framework, the goal of our project is to answer two questions that are of inestimable importance to policymakers and program managers:

    • What is the profile of the current Maryland TANF caseload?
    • How does this profile vary across jurisdictions?

    We hope to contribute to the development of a body of knowledge about welfare users that is comparable to that which currently exists about welfare leavers and generate information that is useful in policy-making and program management in Maryland. (author abstract)

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