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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    OPRE’s research in the area of welfare and family self-sufficiency is designed to expand knowledge about effective programs to promote employment, self-sufficiency, and economic well-being among low-income families. Research focuses on five major areas: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Employment and the Labor Market, Education and Training, Behavioral Science, and Cross-Cutting and Other Safety Net Research. Within these areas, OPRE funds experimental impact evaluations, implementation evaluations, and descriptive research projects aimed at informing the design and implementation of programs. OPRE also invests in activities to disseminate rigorous research on welfare and family self-sufficiency topics. This Portfolio of Research in Welfare and Family Self-Sufficiency describes major welfare and family self-sufficiency research projects sponsored by OPRE in Fiscal Year 2018. (Author abstract) 

     

    OPRE’s research in the area of welfare and family self-sufficiency is designed to expand knowledge about effective programs to promote employment, self-sufficiency, and economic well-being among low-income families. Research focuses on five major areas: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Employment and the Labor Market, Education and Training, Behavioral Science, and Cross-Cutting and Other Safety Net Research. Within these areas, OPRE funds experimental impact evaluations, implementation evaluations, and descriptive research projects aimed at informing the design and implementation of programs. OPRE also invests in activities to disseminate rigorous research on welfare and family self-sufficiency topics. This Portfolio of Research in Welfare and Family Self-Sufficiency describes major welfare and family self-sufficiency research projects sponsored by OPRE in Fiscal Year 2018. (Author abstract) 

     

  • Individual Author: Sama-Miller, Emily; Kleinman, Rebecca; Timmins, Lori; Dahlen, Heather
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    Decades of research have produced convincing evidence of a strong relationship between having a job and enjoying good health. But does employment cause health outcomes or does health cause employment outcomes? If employment can cause health outcomes, does working make health better or worse?

    We distilled the findings from a voluminous literature to draw what conclusions we could from research about the causal relationship between employment and health. That is, we were interested in research evidence that could demonstrate whether a change in employment is responsible for a change in health or vice versa. We also examined the causal relationship between work environment and health, because the relationship between employment and health may depend on the nature and quality of a job, as well. (Edited author introduction)

    Decades of research have produced convincing evidence of a strong relationship between having a job and enjoying good health. But does employment cause health outcomes or does health cause employment outcomes? If employment can cause health outcomes, does working make health better or worse?

    We distilled the findings from a voluminous literature to draw what conclusions we could from research about the causal relationship between employment and health. That is, we were interested in research evidence that could demonstrate whether a change in employment is responsible for a change in health or vice versa. We also examined the causal relationship between work environment and health, because the relationship between employment and health may depend on the nature and quality of a job, as well. (Edited author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Kauff, Jacqueline F.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    This brief was developed under the Goal-Oriented Adult Learning in Self-Sufficiency (GOALS) project on behalf of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE). Under this project, Mathematica Policy Research explored how emerging insights from psychology, neuroscience, behavioral science, and goal achievement can inform workforce development programs for lowincome adults. Several project activities contributed to the development of this brief, including

    (1) a literature synthesis that identified self-regulation skills that may be most relevant for attaining employment-related goals and the environmental influences that can support or inhibit optimal use of these skills (Cavadel et al. 2017),

    (2) telephone calls and exploratory site visits to document how programs for low-income populations are trying to improve and support use of self-regulation skills and goal attainment (Anderson et al. 2018),

    (3) the development of a conceptual framework for understanding the relationship between self-regulation, goal...

    This brief was developed under the Goal-Oriented Adult Learning in Self-Sufficiency (GOALS) project on behalf of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE). Under this project, Mathematica Policy Research explored how emerging insights from psychology, neuroscience, behavioral science, and goal achievement can inform workforce development programs for lowincome adults. Several project activities contributed to the development of this brief, including

    (1) a literature synthesis that identified self-regulation skills that may be most relevant for attaining employment-related goals and the environmental influences that can support or inhibit optimal use of these skills (Cavadel et al. 2017),

    (2) telephone calls and exploratory site visits to document how programs for low-income populations are trying to improve and support use of self-regulation skills and goal attainment (Anderson et al. 2018),

    (3) the development of a conceptual framework for understanding the relationship between self-regulation, goal attainment, and employment outcomes (Anderson et al. 2017),

    (4) evidence-informed quality improvement activities in TANF programs implementing new interventions focused on self-regulation and goal attainment (Derr et al. 2018), and

    (5) telephone interviews with employers that have engaged in public-private partnerships for workforce development. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ross, Christine; Sama-Miller, Emily; Roberts, Lily
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2018

    The Exploration of Integrated Approaches to Supporting Child Development and Improving Family Economic Security project investigated the design and evaluability of approaches to alleviating poverty that address the needs of low-income parents and children. The project examined programs that deliberately combine services that are intended to support both child development and parental economic security. Recent advances in implementation science and other fields of research can provide key insights for new programs that may prove more effective than similar programs designed in the 1980s and 1990s. The project was funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and was conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and Northwestern University. (Author abstract) 

    The Exploration of Integrated Approaches to Supporting Child Development and Improving Family Economic Security project investigated the design and evaluability of approaches to alleviating poverty that address the needs of low-income parents and children. The project examined programs that deliberately combine services that are intended to support both child development and parental economic security. Recent advances in implementation science and other fields of research can provide key insights for new programs that may prove more effective than similar programs designed in the 1980s and 1990s. The project was funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and was conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and Northwestern University. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    There is growing emphasis placed on evidence-based interventions, and opportunities to make programmatic decisions based on evidence reflect progress in promoting positive outcomes. However, some populations (e.g., ethnic and cultural minority communities, marginalized groups) may be left behind in efforts to build evidence, if they are more difficult to study. Over time, as evidence builds for the populations easiest to engage in research, and lags for harder-to-study communities, equity gaps may widen. The purposes of this brief are to:

    • Discuss research disparities between easier-to-study populations and harder-to-study, more marginalized groups
    • Present four strategies to address these research disparities

    The brief describes four possible approaches to addressing research disparities:

    • Engaging community partners in research
    • Prioritizing rigor, not rigidity, in research design
    • Acknowledging challenges to community-based intervention research (including small samples, ethical concerns, implementation challenges,...

    There is growing emphasis placed on evidence-based interventions, and opportunities to make programmatic decisions based on evidence reflect progress in promoting positive outcomes. However, some populations (e.g., ethnic and cultural minority communities, marginalized groups) may be left behind in efforts to build evidence, if they are more difficult to study. Over time, as evidence builds for the populations easiest to engage in research, and lags for harder-to-study communities, equity gaps may widen. The purposes of this brief are to:

    • Discuss research disparities between easier-to-study populations and harder-to-study, more marginalized groups
    • Present four strategies to address these research disparities

    The brief describes four possible approaches to addressing research disparities:

    • Engaging community partners in research
    • Prioritizing rigor, not rigidity, in research design
    • Acknowledging challenges to community-based intervention research (including small samples, ethical concerns, implementation challenges, funding priorities, and evaluating adaptations)
    • Using innovative research designs

    In order to make significant strides in reducing inequities, it is necessary to reduce research disparities and identify effective interventions for diverse communities. The approaches outlined in this brief will help to ensure that all communities can benefit from the advances in scientific evidence that promote positive health and developmental outcomes. (Author abstract) 

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