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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Anderson, Theresa; Kuehn, Daniel ; Eyster, Lauren ; Barnow, Burt S.; Lerman, Robert I.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This final impact report describes the effect of Accelerating Opportunity (AO) on education and employment outcomes for underprepared adult learners. Designed and led by Jobs for the Future and national partners, AO allowed adults with low basic skills to enroll in integrated career pathways at community and technical colleges. The quasi-experimental impact analysis shows that AO students earned more credentials while taking fewer credits, suggesting more efficient course-taking and accelerated learning. These achievements did not translate into labor market gains in the observed timeframe for all students, though AO had strong and sustained positive earnings impacts for some student subgroups. (Author abstract) 

    This final impact report describes the effect of Accelerating Opportunity (AO) on education and employment outcomes for underprepared adult learners. Designed and led by Jobs for the Future and national partners, AO allowed adults with low basic skills to enroll in integrated career pathways at community and technical colleges. The quasi-experimental impact analysis shows that AO students earned more credentials while taking fewer credits, suggesting more efficient course-taking and accelerated learning. These achievements did not translate into labor market gains in the observed timeframe for all students, though AO had strong and sustained positive earnings impacts for some student subgroups. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Lenz-Rashid, Sonja
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Purpose
    This study is an outcome evaluation of Cottage Housing Incorporated's Serna Village Program (CHI), a supportive housing program serving homeless families in Sacramento, California.

    Methods
    This quasi-experimental study examined a sample of 293 children and youth who lived with their parents in CHI between 2002 and 2009.

    Results
    71% of the children had a history of foster care before CHI; 10% of the youth reentered foster care after graduating from CHI (compared with reentry rates of 20–40% from other studies). The CHI youth overall spent less time in care after foster care reentry when compared to other Sacramento County youth. Child welfare costs of the sample before entering CHI were $1,313,262, yet at reentry, child welfare costs were $295,632 (2.5 to 5 years after leaving CHI).

    Conclusions
    Child welfare recidivism rates and total child welfare costs after reentry may decrease for homeless families by providing them with permanent housing and support services. (Author abstract)

    Purpose
    This study is an outcome evaluation of Cottage Housing Incorporated's Serna Village Program (CHI), a supportive housing program serving homeless families in Sacramento, California.

    Methods
    This quasi-experimental study examined a sample of 293 children and youth who lived with their parents in CHI between 2002 and 2009.

    Results
    71% of the children had a history of foster care before CHI; 10% of the youth reentered foster care after graduating from CHI (compared with reentry rates of 20–40% from other studies). The CHI youth overall spent less time in care after foster care reentry when compared to other Sacramento County youth. Child welfare costs of the sample before entering CHI were $1,313,262, yet at reentry, child welfare costs were $295,632 (2.5 to 5 years after leaving CHI).

    Conclusions
    Child welfare recidivism rates and total child welfare costs after reentry may decrease for homeless families by providing them with permanent housing and support services. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Herbst, Chris M.; Tekin, Erdal
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    In this paper, we examine the impact of U.S. child-care subsidies on the cognitive and behavioral development of children in low-income female-headed families. We identify the effect of subsidy receipt by exploiting geographic variation in the distance that families must travel from home to reach the nearest social service agency that administers the subsidy application process. Using data from the Kindergarten cohort of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, our instrumental variables estimates suggest that children receiving subsidized child care in the year before kindergarten score lower on tests of cognitive ability and reveal more behavior problems throughout kindergarten. An auxiliary analysis of longer-run outcomes shows that these negative effects largely disappear by the time children finish first grade. (Author abstract)

    In this paper, we examine the impact of U.S. child-care subsidies on the cognitive and behavioral development of children in low-income female-headed families. We identify the effect of subsidy receipt by exploiting geographic variation in the distance that families must travel from home to reach the nearest social service agency that administers the subsidy application process. Using data from the Kindergarten cohort of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, our instrumental variables estimates suggest that children receiving subsidized child care in the year before kindergarten score lower on tests of cognitive ability and reveal more behavior problems throughout kindergarten. An auxiliary analysis of longer-run outcomes shows that these negative effects largely disappear by the time children finish first grade. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schultz, Caroline; Elliot, Mark; McKernon, Signe-Mary; Lehman, Gretchen
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) includes presentations of findings from three programs intended to promote financial empowerment. Panelists discussed the implications of these findings for policy and practice in expanding economic opportunity.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) includes presentations of findings from three programs intended to promote financial empowerment. Panelists discussed the implications of these findings for policy and practice in expanding economic opportunity.

  • Individual Author: Enchautegui, Maria E.; Chien, Nina; Burgess, Kimberly; Ghertner, Robin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This study used a rigorous difference-in-differences approach to examine the effect of child care policy on women's labor force participation. The study examined the effects of state-level spending, copayment rates, and income eligibility thresholds on the probability of employment and labor force participation by potentially eligible women (defined as women below 85% of state median income and with children ages 0 through 12). Data came from three sources that were merged together for the analyses: the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement (2003-2012); CCDF expenditures from ACF-696 data; and CCDF policy parameters from the CCDF State Policies Database (2003-2012). We found that higher spending by states on child care subsidies increased the probability of employment and of labor force participation by potentially eligible women. In real terms, if current CCDF expenditures were tripled, the number of women newly employed would be 652,000 (among women below 85 percent of SMI with children ages 0 to 12). Somewhat unexpectedly, higher copayment rates and...

    This study used a rigorous difference-in-differences approach to examine the effect of child care policy on women's labor force participation. The study examined the effects of state-level spending, copayment rates, and income eligibility thresholds on the probability of employment and labor force participation by potentially eligible women (defined as women below 85% of state median income and with children ages 0 through 12). Data came from three sources that were merged together for the analyses: the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement (2003-2012); CCDF expenditures from ACF-696 data; and CCDF policy parameters from the CCDF State Policies Database (2003-2012). We found that higher spending by states on child care subsidies increased the probability of employment and of labor force participation by potentially eligible women. In real terms, if current CCDF expenditures were tripled, the number of women newly employed would be 652,000 (among women below 85 percent of SMI with children ages 0 to 12). Somewhat unexpectedly, higher copayment rates and lower income eligibility thresholds were associated with higher probabilities of labor force participation, though these findings were not robust across subgroups. (Author abstract)

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