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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Wood, Robert G.; Goesling, Brian; Paulsell, Diane
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The federal government has had a long-standing commitment to supporting healthy relationships and stable families. In the mid-1990s, Congress created the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant, which had the formation and maintenance of two-parent families as one of its core purposes. TANF provided states with the funding and flexibility to support activities to promote healthy marriage. Beginning in the mid-2000s, the federal government began providing additional funding specifically to support healthy marriage and relationship education (HMRE) services. The Office of Family Assistance (OFA) in the Administration for Children & Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services oversees these funds and distributes them through a set of competitive multi-year grants to organizations nationwide. OFA made the most recent round of HMRE grant awards in September 2015. These grants support HMRE services for a mix of populations, including youth in high school, individual adults, and adult couples. (Author abstract) 

    The federal government has had a long-standing commitment to supporting healthy relationships and stable families. In the mid-1990s, Congress created the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant, which had the formation and maintenance of two-parent families as one of its core purposes. TANF provided states with the funding and flexibility to support activities to promote healthy marriage. Beginning in the mid-2000s, the federal government began providing additional funding specifically to support healthy marriage and relationship education (HMRE) services. The Office of Family Assistance (OFA) in the Administration for Children & Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services oversees these funds and distributes them through a set of competitive multi-year grants to organizations nationwide. OFA made the most recent round of HMRE grant awards in September 2015. These grants support HMRE services for a mix of populations, including youth in high school, individual adults, and adult couples. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Lee, Dohoon; McLanahan, Sara
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    A growing literature documents the importance of family instability for child wellbeing. In this article, we use longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study to examine the impacts of family instability on children’s cognitive and socioemotional development in early and middle childhood. We extend existing research in several ways: (1) by distinguishing between the number and types of family structure changes; (2) by accounting for time-varying as well as time-constant confounding; and (3) by assessing racial/ethnic and gender differences in family instability effects. Our results indicate that family instability has a causal effect on children’s development, but the effect depends on the type of change, the outcome assessed, and the population examined. Generally speaking, transitions out of a two-parent family are more negative for children’s development than transitions into a two-parent family. The effect of family instability is more pronounced for children’s socioemotional development than for their cognitive achievement. For socioemotional...

    A growing literature documents the importance of family instability for child wellbeing. In this article, we use longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study to examine the impacts of family instability on children’s cognitive and socioemotional development in early and middle childhood. We extend existing research in several ways: (1) by distinguishing between the number and types of family structure changes; (2) by accounting for time-varying as well as time-constant confounding; and (3) by assessing racial/ethnic and gender differences in family instability effects. Our results indicate that family instability has a causal effect on children’s development, but the effect depends on the type of change, the outcome assessed, and the population examined. Generally speaking, transitions out of a two-parent family are more negative for children’s development than transitions into a two-parent family. The effect of family instability is more pronounced for children’s socioemotional development than for their cognitive achievement. For socioemotional development, transitions out of a two-parent family are more negative for white children, whereas transitions into a two-parent family are more negative for Hispanic children. These findings suggest that future research should pay more attention to the type of family structure transition and to population heterogeneity. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Scott, Mindy E.; Hickman, Shelby; Brown, Eliza; Faccio, Bianca
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    To better understand what healthy marriage and relationship education (HMRE) and responsible fatherhood (RF) programs are doing to reach and serve Hispanic families, we conducted an extensive review of programs serving Hispanic couples and fathers. Based upon this review, we developed a program guide summarizing multiple aspects of HMRE and RF programs that target and serve Hispanic populations. (author abstract)

    To better understand what healthy marriage and relationship education (HMRE) and responsible fatherhood (RF) programs are doing to reach and serve Hispanic families, we conducted an extensive review of programs serving Hispanic couples and fathers. Based upon this review, we developed a program guide summarizing multiple aspects of HMRE and RF programs that target and serve Hispanic populations. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay; Sommer, Teresa Eckrich; Sabol, Terri J.; King, Christopher T.; Smith, Tara; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    CareerAdvance®, launched by the Community Action Project of Tulsa County (CAP), is a healthcare workforce development program designed for low-income parents of young children enrolled in CAP’s early childhood education programs. The two-generation approach of CareerAdvance® is one of the only sectoral workforce development programs with the explicit goal of improving outcomes simultaneously for both parents and children. The present evaluation of CareerAdvance® represents a strong collaboration between university research partners and CAP. The research partnership began in 2008 when nationally-recognized leaders in workforce program and policy development worked with CAP to design CareerAdvance®, which was launched in 2009. In early 2010, national experts in developmental science broadened the research scope of the study to focus on children’s development and family functioning in addition to parents’ education, training, and financial well-being. (Excerpt from author introduction)

    CareerAdvance®, launched by the Community Action Project of Tulsa County (CAP), is a healthcare workforce development program designed for low-income parents of young children enrolled in CAP’s early childhood education programs. The two-generation approach of CareerAdvance® is one of the only sectoral workforce development programs with the explicit goal of improving outcomes simultaneously for both parents and children. The present evaluation of CareerAdvance® represents a strong collaboration between university research partners and CAP. The research partnership began in 2008 when nationally-recognized leaders in workforce program and policy development worked with CAP to design CareerAdvance®, which was launched in 2009. In early 2010, national experts in developmental science broadened the research scope of the study to focus on children’s development and family functioning in addition to parents’ education, training, and financial well-being. (Excerpt from author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Cox, Ron
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2012

    Eradicating poverty in the United States has eluded policymakers, researchers, and analysts for the past 50 years. After initial decreases  during the 1960s and early 1970s, poverty rates have remained stubbornly stable, wavering from 11% to 15% of the population (Gabe, 2012). Government programs have largely met with only limited success despite investing billions of dollars each year. Recently, a conceptual framework that more seamlessly integrates community and government agencies to form a comprehensive effort against poverty has gained momentum (Kania & Kramer, 2011). Informing this effort have been research findings from the social sciences that have established the decline of two-parent families through divorce and unwed childbearing as an underlying causal agent of poverty. Fueled by these findings, lawmakers made the promotion of healthy marriages and responsible fatherhood a central component of the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity (PRWORA). This research brief examines the rationale behind a framework of integration, the effectiveness of healthy...

    Eradicating poverty in the United States has eluded policymakers, researchers, and analysts for the past 50 years. After initial decreases  during the 1960s and early 1970s, poverty rates have remained stubbornly stable, wavering from 11% to 15% of the population (Gabe, 2012). Government programs have largely met with only limited success despite investing billions of dollars each year. Recently, a conceptual framework that more seamlessly integrates community and government agencies to form a comprehensive effort against poverty has gained momentum (Kania & Kramer, 2011). Informing this effort have been research findings from the social sciences that have established the decline of two-parent families through divorce and unwed childbearing as an underlying causal agent of poverty. Fueled by these findings, lawmakers made the promotion of healthy marriages and responsible fatherhood a central component of the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity (PRWORA). This research brief examines the rationale behind a framework of integration, the effectiveness of healthy marriage and as an intervention, and recent attempts to integrate healthy marriage and relationship education into Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) programs. (author abstract)

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