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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Paulsell, Diane; Kisker, Ellen Eliason; Love, John M.; Raikes, Helen; Boller, Kimberly; Rosenberg, Linda; Coolahan, Kathleen; Berlin, Lisa
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    In any program evaluation, knowing how the program was implemented is critical for understanding program impacts and for making recommendations for program improvements. The National Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project is using several strategies to look into the operations of 17 research programs, including an assessment of the extent to which research programs have implemented Early Head Start, based on selected portions of the revised Head Start Program Performance Standards and the Early Head Start grant announcement. Our understanding of the Early Head Start intervention, and in particular the extent of program implementation, will help us design appropriate impact analyses, understand program impacts, and identify pathways to full implementation and high-quality services in the research programs.

    This volume presents our findings on the extent of the research programs’ implementation in fall 1997, two years after they were funded and one year after they began serving families. It is the third volume in a series of reports that describes the...

    In any program evaluation, knowing how the program was implemented is critical for understanding program impacts and for making recommendations for program improvements. The National Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project is using several strategies to look into the operations of 17 research programs, including an assessment of the extent to which research programs have implemented Early Head Start, based on selected portions of the revised Head Start Program Performance Standards and the Early Head Start grant announcement. Our understanding of the Early Head Start intervention, and in particular the extent of program implementation, will help us design appropriate impact analyses, understand program impacts, and identify pathways to full implementation and high-quality services in the research programs.

    This volume presents our findings on the extent of the research programs’ implementation in fall 1997, two years after they were funded and one year after they began serving families. It is the third volume in a series of reports that describes the characteristics and implementation of the 17 Early Head Start research programs soon after they began serving families. The first two volumes describe the programs’ expected outcomes and services delivered in each of the program areas (Volume I; ACYF 1999a) and present a descriptive profile of each of the 17 research programs (Volume II; ACYF 1999b). A second implementation report, to be completed later in 2000, will present findings on the extent of program implementation in fall 1999 and will describe the developmental pathways the 17 research programs followed over the first four years of Early Head Start program funding. (author abstract)

    An executive summary of all three volumes is also available.

  • Individual Author: Rangarajan, Anu; Novak, Tim
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    The PESD evaluation had three main objectives: (1) to better understand and characterize the experiences of individuals after they become employed and to examine the factors contributing to job loss or job stability, (2) to examine the feasibility of providing services to newly employed welfare recipients and to study issues related to service delivery, and (3) to determine whether postemployment services can help individuals keep their jobs longer or regain employment more quickly after job loss. This report focuses on the third objective and provides an update of our initial findings of the programs’ effectiveness in promoting employment and reducing welfare dependency. In particular, this report examines the effectiveness of the PESD programs in increasing employment and reducing welfare dependency over a two-year period, using administrative records data on program enrollees. (author abstract)

    The PESD evaluation had three main objectives: (1) to better understand and characterize the experiences of individuals after they become employed and to examine the factors contributing to job loss or job stability, (2) to examine the feasibility of providing services to newly employed welfare recipients and to study issues related to service delivery, and (3) to determine whether postemployment services can help individuals keep their jobs longer or regain employment more quickly after job loss. This report focuses on the third objective and provides an update of our initial findings of the programs’ effectiveness in promoting employment and reducing welfare dependency. In particular, this report examines the effectiveness of the PESD programs in increasing employment and reducing welfare dependency over a two-year period, using administrative records data on program enrollees. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Anderson, Jacquelyn; Martinson, Karin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    Considerable interest exists among state and local welfare departments, workforce investment agencies, community colleges, and other nonprofit community-based service providers to find ways to promote job retention and advancement among employed welfare recipients and other low-wage working families. Little is known, however, about what services are effective. The Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) evaluation, designed to provide more information about what works in this area, is the largest and most comprehensive study of its kind. Conceived and sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the evaluation is being conducted under contract by MDRC, a nonprofit, nonpartisan social policy research organization. The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has provided additional funding for the project. As of December 2002, a total of 15 ERA programs are being tested in 8 states. This report describes the initial experiences of those programs, focusing on implementation issues and institutional connections...

    Considerable interest exists among state and local welfare departments, workforce investment agencies, community colleges, and other nonprofit community-based service providers to find ways to promote job retention and advancement among employed welfare recipients and other low-wage working families. Little is known, however, about what services are effective. The Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) evaluation, designed to provide more information about what works in this area, is the largest and most comprehensive study of its kind. Conceived and sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the evaluation is being conducted under contract by MDRC, a nonprofit, nonpartisan social policy research organization. The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has provided additional funding for the project. As of December 2002, a total of 15 ERA programs are being tested in 8 states. This report describes the initial experiences of those programs, focusing on implementation issues and institutional connections. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Marks, Ellen L.; Dewees, Sarah; Ouellette, Tammy; Koralek, Robin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    The enactment of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act in 1996 signaled a dramatic shift in the nation’s approach to providing assistance to those among the country’s neediest populations. The concept of welfare in the United States shifted from cash assistance to economic self-sufficiency. Rural welfare populations possess unique characteristics and face unique circumstances that will affect their ability to achieve the requirements and intent of welfare reform. To build knowledge and research about effective approaches in working with rural populations, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) awarded planning grants to ten states to help develop and study strategies to move rural families from welfare to work. Although there are extensive bodies of literature both on rural matters and on welfare-related matters, there is relatively little information about rural welfare issues. This report synthesizes available knowledge and, where appropriate, draws inferences from studies about the ways that welfare reform is likely to affect rural welfare to work...

    The enactment of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act in 1996 signaled a dramatic shift in the nation’s approach to providing assistance to those among the country’s neediest populations. The concept of welfare in the United States shifted from cash assistance to economic self-sufficiency. Rural welfare populations possess unique characteristics and face unique circumstances that will affect their ability to achieve the requirements and intent of welfare reform. To build knowledge and research about effective approaches in working with rural populations, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) awarded planning grants to ten states to help develop and study strategies to move rural families from welfare to work. Although there are extensive bodies of literature both on rural matters and on welfare-related matters, there is relatively little information about rural welfare issues. This report synthesizes available knowledge and, where appropriate, draws inferences from studies about the ways that welfare reform is likely to affect rural welfare to work strategies. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Administration for Children and Families
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1999

    The second meeting of grantees for the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) Rural Welfare to Work Strategies project was held June 28-29, 1999, at the Humphrey Building, Washington, DC. Representatives from the following States attended: Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, Vermont, and Washington.

    Mary Ann MacKenzie, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE), ACF, welcomed grantees and noted ACF's excitement about the initiative, which is on the cutting edge of welfare reform research. Over 19 States have a population that is more than 30 percent rural. The goal of this initiative is to identify what is working in rural welfare reform and to foster collaboration among States in future efforts. (author abstract)

    The second meeting of grantees for the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) Rural Welfare to Work Strategies project was held June 28-29, 1999, at the Humphrey Building, Washington, DC. Representatives from the following States attended: Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, Vermont, and Washington.

    Mary Ann MacKenzie, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE), ACF, welcomed grantees and noted ACF's excitement about the initiative, which is on the cutting edge of welfare reform research. Over 19 States have a population that is more than 30 percent rural. The goal of this initiative is to identify what is working in rural welfare reform and to foster collaboration among States in future efforts. (author abstract)

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