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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Lenz-Rashid, Sonja
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Purpose
    This study is an outcome evaluation of Cottage Housing Incorporated's Serna Village Program (CHI), a supportive housing program serving homeless families in Sacramento, California.

    Methods
    This quasi-experimental study examined a sample of 293 children and youth who lived with their parents in CHI between 2002 and 2009.

    Results
    71% of the children had a history of foster care before CHI; 10% of the youth reentered foster care after graduating from CHI (compared with reentry rates of 20–40% from other studies). The CHI youth overall spent less time in care after foster care reentry when compared to other Sacramento County youth. Child welfare costs of the sample before entering CHI were $1,313,262, yet at reentry, child welfare costs were $295,632 (2.5 to 5 years after leaving CHI).

    Conclusions
    Child welfare recidivism rates and total child welfare costs after reentry may decrease for homeless families by providing them with permanent housing and support services. (Author abstract)

    Purpose
    This study is an outcome evaluation of Cottage Housing Incorporated's Serna Village Program (CHI), a supportive housing program serving homeless families in Sacramento, California.

    Methods
    This quasi-experimental study examined a sample of 293 children and youth who lived with their parents in CHI between 2002 and 2009.

    Results
    71% of the children had a history of foster care before CHI; 10% of the youth reentered foster care after graduating from CHI (compared with reentry rates of 20–40% from other studies). The CHI youth overall spent less time in care after foster care reentry when compared to other Sacramento County youth. Child welfare costs of the sample before entering CHI were $1,313,262, yet at reentry, child welfare costs were $295,632 (2.5 to 5 years after leaving CHI).

    Conclusions
    Child welfare recidivism rates and total child welfare costs after reentry may decrease for homeless families by providing them with permanent housing and support services. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Brakenhoff, Brittany; Jang, Bohyun; Slesnick, Natasha; Snyder, Anastasia
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Homeless youth represent a vulnerable and understudied population. Little research has prospectively identified factors that may place youth at risk for experiencing homelessness. The current study utilizes data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-97 (NLSY-97) to examine predictors of experiencing homelessness as a young adult (before age 25). The NLSY-97 includes a nationally representative sample of 8984 youth. Data were first collected from these youth when they were between the ages of 12 and 18 years. The current study examined whether individual and family risk factors reported during adolescence predict homelessness by the age of 25. The findings showed that multiple runaway episodes, nontraditional family structure, lower educational attainment, and parental work limitations due to health increased the risk of homelessness. A permissive parenting style and being Hispanic protected against homelessness. This study offers unique insight into risk and protective factors for youth homelessness and has important clinical implications. (author abstract)

    Homeless youth represent a vulnerable and understudied population. Little research has prospectively identified factors that may place youth at risk for experiencing homelessness. The current study utilizes data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-97 (NLSY-97) to examine predictors of experiencing homelessness as a young adult (before age 25). The NLSY-97 includes a nationally representative sample of 8984 youth. Data were first collected from these youth when they were between the ages of 12 and 18 years. The current study examined whether individual and family risk factors reported during adolescence predict homelessness by the age of 25. The findings showed that multiple runaway episodes, nontraditional family structure, lower educational attainment, and parental work limitations due to health increased the risk of homelessness. A permissive parenting style and being Hispanic protected against homelessness. This study offers unique insight into risk and protective factors for youth homelessness and has important clinical implications. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Aidala, Angela A.; McAllister, William; Yomogida, Maiko ; Shubert, Virginia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This report from the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health is an evaluation that follows FUSE program participants from recruitment through two years after placement into supportive housing. Housing instability and homelessness increase the risk for incarceration and, conversely, incarceration increases the risk for homelessness. FUSE provided supportive housing to approximately 200 individuals who were frequently cycling in and out of jails and homeless shelters. The report also describes the intervention, evaluation, and outcomes of FUSE II, a second-generation FUSE initiative. (Author abstract)

    This report from the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health is an evaluation that follows FUSE program participants from recruitment through two years after placement into supportive housing. Housing instability and homelessness increase the risk for incarceration and, conversely, incarceration increases the risk for homelessness. FUSE provided supportive housing to approximately 200 individuals who were frequently cycling in and out of jails and homeless shelters. The report also describes the intervention, evaluation, and outcomes of FUSE II, a second-generation FUSE initiative. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Swann-Jackson, Rebecca; Tapper, Donna; Fields, Allison
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    Keeping Families Together (KFT) is a pilot initiative of the Corporation for Supportive Housing (CSH) that was designed to test the impact of permanent supportive housing for families who had been involved with the child welfare system and who had been homeless for at least a year. With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the initiative targeted the most vulnerable families, aiming to improve agency collaboration in support of these families and build capacity among providers to serve them...

    Metis Associates conducted its evaluation of the KFT pilot between September 2009 and May 2010. The evaluation, which was designed to assess the extent to which the initiative met its objectives, built on work begun by Dr. Sylvia Ridlen, the project's first evaluator. It includes a retrospective assessment of the implementation of the pilot initiative and an outcome evaluation that has examined the impact of the initiative on participating KFT families. Metis conducted a review of program documentation, focus group interviews with supportive housing providers (directors...

    Keeping Families Together (KFT) is a pilot initiative of the Corporation for Supportive Housing (CSH) that was designed to test the impact of permanent supportive housing for families who had been involved with the child welfare system and who had been homeless for at least a year. With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the initiative targeted the most vulnerable families, aiming to improve agency collaboration in support of these families and build capacity among providers to serve them...

    Metis Associates conducted its evaluation of the KFT pilot between September 2009 and May 2010. The evaluation, which was designed to assess the extent to which the initiative met its objectives, built on work begun by Dr. Sylvia Ridlen, the project's first evaluator. It includes a retrospective assessment of the implementation of the pilot initiative and an outcome evaluation that has examined the impact of the initiative on participating KFT families. Metis conducted a review of program documentation, focus group interviews with supportive housing providers (directors and case managers) and families, and interviews with representatives of city agencies, interviews with CSH staff and the project's clinical consultant. Limited data from interviews with KFT families conducted by Dr. Ridlen also were incorporated into this report. Several types of administrative data were analyzed. For consenting families, child welfare data were obtained from the New York City Administration for Children’s Services (ACS). Education data on public school students in the KFT families were accessed from a repository maintained by Metis through an agreement with the New York City Department of Education. Data on homelessness for a comparison group of similarly situated families who did not enter supportive housing were provided by the New York City Department of Homeless Services (DHS). Additional data on KFT families were obtained from case managers' records. (author summary)

  • Individual Author: Moreno, Manuel H.; Stevens, Max; Toros, Halil; Doan, Duc; Salem, Nancy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has become increasingly engaged in questions surrounding the County’s homeless population and in the search for solutions to the problem of homelessness. The County’s Homeless Prevention Initiative (HPI) is a product of the heightened urgency the issue of homelessness has taken on for the Board and the public more generally. The Department of Public Social Service’s (DPSS) Housing Locators program for Welfare-to-Work participants is a component of the HPI, and the present evaluation report has been written to inform the Board about the program’s functionality and its outcomes during the first 11 months after implementation. The report provides both quantitative analysis, based on DPSS’ administrative data for the Housing Locator program, and qualitative analysis, based on interviews conducted with staff and management at both DPSS and the two organizations contracting with DPSS to provide Housing Locator Services for Welfare-to-Work participants (Del Richardson and Associates and Weingart Center Association). Based on the lessons...

    The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has become increasingly engaged in questions surrounding the County’s homeless population and in the search for solutions to the problem of homelessness. The County’s Homeless Prevention Initiative (HPI) is a product of the heightened urgency the issue of homelessness has taken on for the Board and the public more generally. The Department of Public Social Service’s (DPSS) Housing Locators program for Welfare-to-Work participants is a component of the HPI, and the present evaluation report has been written to inform the Board about the program’s functionality and its outcomes during the first 11 months after implementation. The report provides both quantitative analysis, based on DPSS’ administrative data for the Housing Locator program, and qualitative analysis, based on interviews conducted with staff and management at both DPSS and the two organizations contracting with DPSS to provide Housing Locator Services for Welfare-to-Work participants (Del Richardson and Associates and Weingart Center Association). Based on the lessons learned from these two different but complementary levels of analysis, the report concludes with policy recommendations for DPSS and the Board to consider as efforts are made to enhance the program in the future. (author abstract)

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