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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Stargel, Lauren E.; Fauth, Rebecca C.; Easterbrooks, M. Ann
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    In the current study, we aimed to determine the effects of Healthy Families Massachusetts (HFM), a statewide home visiting program, on young mothers’ experiences with homelessness during enrollment and after program completion. Data were drawn from a longitudinal, randomized control trial evaluation of HFM. Data collection occurred across 5 time points between 2008 and 2015 from a sample of 704 participants. The current analyses were restricted to a subsample of mothers (n = 443) with Time 5 data (74 months post-enrollment; 59.1% program, 40.9% control), which was representative of the Time 1 sample. We used data from maternal phone interviews to assess program effects on experiences with homelessness. Young mothers who participated in HFM were less likely to experience homelessness when their children were preschool-age or older than mothers in the control group. During program participation, the number of home visits was negatively associated with concurrent homelessness when children were infants or toddlers. (Author abstract)

    In the current study, we aimed to determine the effects of Healthy Families Massachusetts (HFM), a statewide home visiting program, on young mothers’ experiences with homelessness during enrollment and after program completion. Data were drawn from a longitudinal, randomized control trial evaluation of HFM. Data collection occurred across 5 time points between 2008 and 2015 from a sample of 704 participants. The current analyses were restricted to a subsample of mothers (n = 443) with Time 5 data (74 months post-enrollment; 59.1% program, 40.9% control), which was representative of the Time 1 sample. We used data from maternal phone interviews to assess program effects on experiences with homelessness. Young mothers who participated in HFM were less likely to experience homelessness when their children were preschool-age or older than mothers in the control group. During program participation, the number of home visits was negatively associated with concurrent homelessness when children were infants or toddlers. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ferguson, Daniel
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    President Obama signed the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 into law on November 19, 2014, reauthorizing the federal child care program for the first time since 1996. The law has important implications for child care policy across the United States, in areas including provider health and safety requirements, consumer education, subsidy redetermination, quality improvement, and tribal child care. The full statute and a plain language summary are available on the Office of Child Care website, along with continually-updated resources on the reauthorization. The following resources, which can be found in the Research Connections collection, are related to or support the implementation of the reauthorized Child Care and Development Block Grant. They have been grouped in the following categories: official guidance from the U.S. Office of Child Care; Child Care and Development Fund state plans; state policy and administrative data; and state policy options and technical assistance resource, which have been further categorized by policy topics. (Author abstract...

    President Obama signed the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 into law on November 19, 2014, reauthorizing the federal child care program for the first time since 1996. The law has important implications for child care policy across the United States, in areas including provider health and safety requirements, consumer education, subsidy redetermination, quality improvement, and tribal child care. The full statute and a plain language summary are available on the Office of Child Care website, along with continually-updated resources on the reauthorization. The following resources, which can be found in the Research Connections collection, are related to or support the implementation of the reauthorized Child Care and Development Block Grant. They have been grouped in the following categories: official guidance from the U.S. Office of Child Care; Child Care and Development Fund state plans; state policy and administrative data; and state policy options and technical assistance resource, which have been further categorized by policy topics. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Stephens, Samuel A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This Research-to-Policy Resource List identifies resources in the Research Connections collection published in 2010 or later that examine access to and utilization of early care and education by children in families experiencing homelessness, early childhood programs and practices that are designed to address their specific developmental needs, and policy options to increase access to high quality care and education for this particularly vulnerable group of young children. (Author introduction)

    This Research-to-Policy Resource List identifies resources in the Research Connections collection published in 2010 or later that examine access to and utilization of early care and education by children in families experiencing homelessness, early childhood programs and practices that are designed to address their specific developmental needs, and policy options to increase access to high quality care and education for this particularly vulnerable group of young children. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Sieving, Renee E.; McRee, Annie-Laurie; McMorris, Barbara J.; Shlafer, Rebecca J.; Gower, Amy L.; Kapa, Hillary M.; Beckman, Kara J.; Plowman, Shari L.; Resnick, Michael D.; Doty, Jennifer L.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Over the past 30 years, prevention science in the adolescent health field has moved from interventions focused on preventing single problem behaviors to efforts employing a dual approach, addressing risk factors that predict problems while simultaneously nurturing protective factors and promoting positive development. Through an examination of previous research and empirical case examples with vulnerable youth, this article considers the hypothesis that adolescents’ sense of connectedness to caring adults acts as a protective factor against a range of risk behaviors. Multivariate analyses with existing data examined indicators of youth–adult connectedness among two groups at high risk for poor health outcomes: (1) mentor–youth relationship quality in an urban, ethnically diverse sample of students in a school-based mentoring program (2014 survey, N=239); and (2) parent–youth connectedness in a statewide sample of high school students who reported homelessness in the past year (2013 survey, N=3,627). For youth in the mentoring program, a high-quality youth–mentor relationship was...

    Over the past 30 years, prevention science in the adolescent health field has moved from interventions focused on preventing single problem behaviors to efforts employing a dual approach, addressing risk factors that predict problems while simultaneously nurturing protective factors and promoting positive development. Through an examination of previous research and empirical case examples with vulnerable youth, this article considers the hypothesis that adolescents’ sense of connectedness to caring adults acts as a protective factor against a range of risk behaviors. Multivariate analyses with existing data examined indicators of youth–adult connectedness among two groups at high risk for poor health outcomes: (1) mentor–youth relationship quality in an urban, ethnically diverse sample of students in a school-based mentoring program (2014 survey, N=239); and (2) parent–youth connectedness in a statewide sample of high school students who reported homelessness in the past year (2013 survey, N=3,627). For youth in the mentoring program, a high-quality youth–mentor relationship was significantly associated with positive social, academic, and health-related behaviors. Among students who experienced homelessness, all measures of parent connectedness were significantly associated with lower sexual risk levels. Collectively, findings from these analyses and previously published studies by this research group provide evidence that strong, positive relationships with parents and other caring adults protect adolescents from a range of poor health-related outcomes and promote positive development. Youth–adult connectedness appears to be foundational for adolescent health and well-being. Program, practice, and policy decisions should consider what strengthens or hinders caring, connected youth–adult relationships. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Pergamit, Mike; Gelatt, Julia; Stratford, Brandon; Beckwith, Samuel; Carver Martin, Miranda
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report summarizes evidence on family intervention strategies for youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness, gathered through a literature review and conversations with a few key informants. Research has uncovered a few effective family intervention strategies that provide insight into what makes these strategies successful, but more research is needed to evaluate those targeted to youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness. More research is also needed on how to target family interventions to key subgroups, such as youth who are racial and ethnic minorities or LGBTQ. (author abstract)

    This report summarizes evidence on family intervention strategies for youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness, gathered through a literature review and conversations with a few key informants. Research has uncovered a few effective family intervention strategies that provide insight into what makes these strategies successful, but more research is needed to evaluate those targeted to youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness. More research is also needed on how to target family interventions to key subgroups, such as youth who are racial and ethnic minorities or LGBTQ. (author abstract)

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