Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Anderson, Debra Gay; Fallin, Amanda; Al-Modallal, Hanan
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a pervasive problem that follows victims from the home into the workplace. Many women who experience violence in their homes are also harassed at work and are abused in the workplace. For the current study, 30 women who reported a history of workplace violence were recruited from a homeless women’s shelter. Of the participants, 13 experienced domestic violence in the workplace; this article focuses on the results obtained from those 13 respondents. This article also discusses the link between homelessness, IPV, and workplace violence. (author abstract)

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a pervasive problem that follows victims from the home into the workplace. Many women who experience violence in their homes are also harassed at work and are abused in the workplace. For the current study, 30 women who reported a history of workplace violence were recruited from a homeless women’s shelter. Of the participants, 13 experienced domestic violence in the workplace; this article focuses on the results obtained from those 13 respondents. This article also discusses the link between homelessness, IPV, and workplace violence. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lei, Lei
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Due to various barriers that keep homeless people away from regular work, a considerable proportion of them resort to day labor or subsistence “work,” such as peddling and panhandling, to earn income. Using the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients (NSHAPC) data, this study compares the personal characteristics of currently homeless and nonhomeless persons and examines how demographic characteristics, physical health and mental health problems, and substance abuse affect the employment status and income-earning approaches of homeless assistance clients. It finally provides suggestions for public assistance programs and future research. (author abstract)

    Due to various barriers that keep homeless people away from regular work, a considerable proportion of them resort to day labor or subsistence “work,” such as peddling and panhandling, to earn income. Using the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients (NSHAPC) data, this study compares the personal characteristics of currently homeless and nonhomeless persons and examines how demographic characteristics, physical health and mental health problems, and substance abuse affect the employment status and income-earning approaches of homeless assistance clients. It finally provides suggestions for public assistance programs and future research. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Dunlap, Nathan; Rynell, Amy; Young, Melissa; Warland, Chris
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Individuals experiencing or at risk of homelessness are motivated to engage in services, employment and other life changes at different times and in different ways. Understanding how to meet people where they are and help foster the process of change can bolster program successes with people experiencing homelessness.
    With this in mind, employment programs should consider supporting transitions to employment by applying program principles and techniques that foster positive change, meet individual needs and interests, and help participants acclimate to the norms and practices of the workplace. Drawing from the success of homeless system providers, workforce programs may apply the following:

    • understand and facilitate the process of change,
    • offer employment program options that meet individual’s aptitudes, interests, and readiness to change,
    • deliver services that take into account participants’ experiences with trauma, and
    • focus the organization, services, and program staff on prioritizing employment and reinforcing a culture of work....

    Individuals experiencing or at risk of homelessness are motivated to engage in services, employment and other life changes at different times and in different ways. Understanding how to meet people where they are and help foster the process of change can bolster program successes with people experiencing homelessness.
    With this in mind, employment programs should consider supporting transitions to employment by applying program principles and techniques that foster positive change, meet individual needs and interests, and help participants acclimate to the norms and practices of the workplace. Drawing from the success of homeless system providers, workforce programs may apply the following:

    • understand and facilitate the process of change,
    • offer employment program options that meet individual’s aptitudes, interests, and readiness to change,
    • deliver services that take into account participants’ experiences with trauma, and
    • focus the organization, services, and program staff on prioritizing employment and reinforcing a culture of work.

    (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Courtney, Mark E.; Osgood, D. W. ; Foster, Michael
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    D. Wayne Osgood, E. Michael Foster, and Mark E. Courtney examine the transition to adult- hood for youth involved in social service and justice systems during childhood and adolescence. They survey the challenges faced by youth in the mental health system, the foster care system, the juvenile justice system, the criminal justice system, and special education, and by youth with physical disabilities and chronic illness, as well as runaway and homeless youth.

    One problem is that the services these vulnerable populations receive from these systems as children and adolescents often end abruptly as they transition to adulthood, even though the need for them continues. Youth must leave systems tailored for clients their age and, if they are eligible for further services at all, enter adult systems that are not equipped to address their needs. One exception is the special education system, whose services extend into early adult- hood and are designed for individuals’ needs.

    The authors review current public policies directed toward vulnerable youth in transition and find...

    D. Wayne Osgood, E. Michael Foster, and Mark E. Courtney examine the transition to adult- hood for youth involved in social service and justice systems during childhood and adolescence. They survey the challenges faced by youth in the mental health system, the foster care system, the juvenile justice system, the criminal justice system, and special education, and by youth with physical disabilities and chronic illness, as well as runaway and homeless youth.

    One problem is that the services these vulnerable populations receive from these systems as children and adolescents often end abruptly as they transition to adulthood, even though the need for them continues. Youth must leave systems tailored for clients their age and, if they are eligible for further services at all, enter adult systems that are not equipped to address their needs. One exception is the special education system, whose services extend into early adult- hood and are designed for individuals’ needs.

    The authors review current public policies directed toward vulnerable youth in transition and find problems in four areas: eligibility criteria that exclude youth from services that might benefit them, inadequate funding for transition services, a lack of coordination across service systems, and inadequate training about young-adult developmental issues for service professionals.

    The authors then discuss policy options that can help create a developmentally appropriate and socially inclusive system of support for vulnerable youth. Among the options are strengthening all programs for youth in transition, improving the existing systems of care for children and adolescents, addressing the loss of access to services at the age of majority, and coordinating today’s multiple systems into a single coherent system. The authors see heightened governmental interest in better supports for vulnerable young adults, both through expanding the federal role in their lives and through improving coordination of the systems that serve them. The Fostering Connections Act of 2008, for example, extended services to adolescents in foster care from the age of eighteen to the age of twenty-one. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Long, David; Rio, John; Rosen, Jeremy
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2007

    In this paper, the authors synthesize the findings of recent studies examining the role of mainstream programs such as Social Security Administration (SSA) disability programs, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and Workforce Investment Act (WIA) initiatives in enhancing employment and incomes for people who have experienced homelessness. They also describe the design and outcomes of targeted programs designed specifically to address employment and income support for people who are homeless. While some rigorous evaluations have been done on mainstream programs, the effects of the interventions on the subpopulation that has been homeless are often not addressed. Few rigorous studies have been done on targeted programs. The authors draw several conclusions from the available evidence and outline future research directions to fill important gaps in the research literature. (author abstract) 

    In this paper, the authors synthesize the findings of recent studies examining the role of mainstream programs such as Social Security Administration (SSA) disability programs, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and Workforce Investment Act (WIA) initiatives in enhancing employment and incomes for people who have experienced homelessness. They also describe the design and outcomes of targeted programs designed specifically to address employment and income support for people who are homeless. While some rigorous evaluations have been done on mainstream programs, the effects of the interventions on the subpopulation that has been homeless are often not addressed. Few rigorous studies have been done on targeted programs. The authors draw several conclusions from the available evidence and outline future research directions to fill important gaps in the research literature. (author abstract) 

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1996 to 2014

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations