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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Anzelone, Caitlin; Dechausay, Nadine; Datta, Saugato; Fiorillo, Alexandra; Potok, Louis; Darling, Matthew; Balz, John
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Insights from behavioral economics, which combines findings from psychology and economics, suggest that a deeper understanding of decision-making and behavior could improve human services program design and outcomes. Research has shown that small changes in the environment can facilitate behaviors and decisions that are in people’s best interest. However, there has been relatively little exploration of the potential application of this science to complex, large-scale human services programs.

    This report, from the early stages of OPRE’s Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project, provides an overview of behavioral economics, presents an approach to applying behavioral economics to social programs, shares insights from three case studies in the BIAS project, and concludes with some early lessons that have emerged from the work and next steps for the BIAS project. Additionally, a separate technical supplement to the report provides a description of 12 commonly applied behavioral interventions identified through a review of the literature. (author...

    Insights from behavioral economics, which combines findings from psychology and economics, suggest that a deeper understanding of decision-making and behavior could improve human services program design and outcomes. Research has shown that small changes in the environment can facilitate behaviors and decisions that are in people’s best interest. However, there has been relatively little exploration of the potential application of this science to complex, large-scale human services programs.

    This report, from the early stages of OPRE’s Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project, provides an overview of behavioral economics, presents an approach to applying behavioral economics to social programs, shares insights from three case studies in the BIAS project, and concludes with some early lessons that have emerged from the work and next steps for the BIAS project. Additionally, a separate technical supplement to the report provides a description of 12 commonly applied behavioral interventions identified through a review of the literature. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: National Association of Counties; CSH
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    Supportive housing is an intervention that has been shown to have positive outcomes for frequent users of jails, shelters, hospitals and other (often county-funded) public systems and provides access to affordable housing coupled with individually tailored wrap-around services and supports. There are many benefits to be gained from initiating a supportive housing project for frequent users. Learn about the Frequent Users Systems Engagement (FUSE) model, how supportive housing concepts have been initiated in counties throughout the country and ways in which your county can get started. (Author abstract)

    Supportive housing is an intervention that has been shown to have positive outcomes for frequent users of jails, shelters, hospitals and other (often county-funded) public systems and provides access to affordable housing coupled with individually tailored wrap-around services and supports. There are many benefits to be gained from initiating a supportive housing project for frequent users. Learn about the Frequent Users Systems Engagement (FUSE) model, how supportive housing concepts have been initiated in counties throughout the country and ways in which your county can get started. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Jacobs, Erin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    More than 1.6 million people are incarcerated in prisons in the United States, and around 700,000 are released from prison each year. Those released from prison often face daunting obstacles as they seek to reintegrate into their communities, and rates of recidivism are high. Many experts believe that stable employment is critical to a successful transition from prison to the community.

    The Joyce Foundation’s Transitional Jobs Reentry Demonstration (TJRD), also funded by the JEHT Foundation and the U.S. Department of Labor, tested employment programs for former prisoners in Chicago, Detroit, Milwaukee, and St. Paul, using a rigorous random assignment design. MDRC led the evaluation, along with the Urban Institute and the University of Michigan. The project focused on transitional jobs programs that provide temporary subsidized jobs, support services, and job placement help. Transitional jobs are seen as a promising model for former prisoners and for other disadvantaged groups.

    In 2007-2008, more than 1,800 men who had...

    More than 1.6 million people are incarcerated in prisons in the United States, and around 700,000 are released from prison each year. Those released from prison often face daunting obstacles as they seek to reintegrate into their communities, and rates of recidivism are high. Many experts believe that stable employment is critical to a successful transition from prison to the community.

    The Joyce Foundation’s Transitional Jobs Reentry Demonstration (TJRD), also funded by the JEHT Foundation and the U.S. Department of Labor, tested employment programs for former prisoners in Chicago, Detroit, Milwaukee, and St. Paul, using a rigorous random assignment design. MDRC led the evaluation, along with the Urban Institute and the University of Michigan. The project focused on transitional jobs programs that provide temporary subsidized jobs, support services, and job placement help. Transitional jobs are seen as a promising model for former prisoners and for other disadvantaged groups.

    In 2007-2008, more than 1,800 men who had recently been released from prison were assigned, at random, to a transitional jobs program or to a program providing basic job search assistance but no subsidized jobs. The research team tracked both groups using state data on employment and recidivism. Because of the random assignment design, one can be confident that significant differences that emerged between the groups are attributable to the services each group received.

    This is the final report in the TJRD project. It assesses how the transitional jobs programs affected employment and recidivism during the two years after people entered the study. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cho, Rosa Minhyo
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    With rapid growth in female incarceration rates, an unprecedented number of children are growing up in households with incarcerated mothers. This study examines the influences of timing and dosage on the relations between maternal incarceration and adolescent children's high school dropout rate as well as on the association between maternal incarceration and the youth's risk of incarceration. The length and frequency of the mother's separation from her child are here described as dosage. The article analyzes data on 9,563 children who are between the ages of 5 and 17 when their mothers enter either jail or prison. A sibling-pair sample is used to control for unobserved maternal household-level characteristics, and the results suggest that only adolescent boys are sensitive to the timing of maternal incarceration, as exposure during early adolescence is associated with larger negative school outcomes than those for exposure during middle childhood or late adolescence. Boys are found to be more sensitive than girls to the frequency of maternal incarceration, but girls are more...

    With rapid growth in female incarceration rates, an unprecedented number of children are growing up in households with incarcerated mothers. This study examines the influences of timing and dosage on the relations between maternal incarceration and adolescent children's high school dropout rate as well as on the association between maternal incarceration and the youth's risk of incarceration. The length and frequency of the mother's separation from her child are here described as dosage. The article analyzes data on 9,563 children who are between the ages of 5 and 17 when their mothers enter either jail or prison. A sibling-pair sample is used to control for unobserved maternal household-level characteristics, and the results suggest that only adolescent boys are sensitive to the timing of maternal incarceration, as exposure during early adolescence is associated with larger negative school outcomes than those for exposure during middle childhood or late adolescence. Boys are found to be more sensitive than girls to the frequency of maternal incarceration, but girls are more sensitive to length. Both display sensitivity to dosages of maternal incarceration, and the direction of relations is unexpected. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Griswold, Esther A.; Pearson, Jessica
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    This article describes four demonstration projects that strive to promote responsible behavior with respect to parenting, child support payment, and employment among incarcerated and paroled parents with child support obligations. These projects, conducted in Colorado, Illinois, Massachusetts, and Texas, with support from the federal Office of Child Support Enforcement and evaluated by the Center for Policy Research, led to a number of common outcomes and lessons. The projects revealed that inmates want help with child support, parenting, and employment and that prisons can be effective settings in which to conduct such interventions. Family reintegration programs were popular with inmates and may have helped to avoid the rupture of parent–child relationships commonly associated with incarceration. Although employment is the key to child support payment following release, rates of postrelease employment and earnings at all project sites were low and the employment programs were of limited utility in helping released offenders find jobs. Agencies dealing with child support,...

    This article describes four demonstration projects that strive to promote responsible behavior with respect to parenting, child support payment, and employment among incarcerated and paroled parents with child support obligations. These projects, conducted in Colorado, Illinois, Massachusetts, and Texas, with support from the federal Office of Child Support Enforcement and evaluated by the Center for Policy Research, led to a number of common outcomes and lessons. The projects revealed that inmates want help with child support, parenting, and employment and that prisons can be effective settings in which to conduct such interventions. Family reintegration programs were popular with inmates and may have helped to avoid the rupture of parent–child relationships commonly associated with incarceration. Although employment is the key to child support payment following release, rates of postrelease employment and earnings at all project sites were low and the employment programs were of limited utility in helping released offenders find jobs. Agencies dealing with child support, employment, and criminal justice need to adopt more effective policies with incarcerated parents including transitional job programs that guarantee immediate, subsidized employment upon release, child support guidelines that adjust for low earnings, and better training and education opportunities during incarceration. (author abstract)

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