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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Rue, Lisa; Chamberlain, Seth; Covington, Reginald; Goesling, Brian; Zief, Susan
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This panel highlighted three studies funded through the Personal Responsibility Education Program multi-component evaluation and the Federal Evaluation of Selected Programs for Expectant and Parenting Youth. These evaluations document how teen pregnancy prevention initiatives and programs for expectant and parenting teens are implemented in the field and assess selected programs’ effectiveness. Seth Chamberlain (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session and Lisa Rue (University of Northern Colorado) served as the discussant. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    This panel highlighted three studies funded through the Personal Responsibility Education Program multi-component evaluation and the Federal Evaluation of Selected Programs for Expectant and Parenting Youth. These evaluations document how teen pregnancy prevention initiatives and programs for expectant and parenting teens are implemented in the field and assess selected programs’ effectiveness. Seth Chamberlain (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session and Lisa Rue (University of Northern Colorado) served as the discussant. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Office of Child Support Enforcement
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2011

    This fact sheet discusses the benefits of incorporating child support education principles into your program. Child support education increases the student’s awareness of parental responsibilities, educates about teen pregnancy, and prevents the need for child support services. (Author introduction)

    This fact sheet discusses the benefits of incorporating child support education principles into your program. Child support education increases the student’s awareness of parental responsibilities, educates about teen pregnancy, and prevents the need for child support services. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta; Burkhauser, Mary ; Metz, Allison
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    This report discusses the outcomes of a research review that evaluated evidence-based research findings on teen fatherhood programs and identified effective programs. It begins by emphasizing the importance of teen fatherhood programs, discussing barriers to teen participation in programs, and explaining principles that were used to identify rigorous research on effective teen fatherhood programs and the criteria used for considering fatherhood programs for the review. Different types of teen fatherhood programs are described, along with ten characteristics of effective teen fatherhood programs drawn from four teen fatherhood programs that were considered effective: Young Dads, a prenatal education intervention, Respecting and Protecting our Relationships, and the STEP-UP program. Effective programs were found to partner with community organizations to help recruit and engage teen fathers; plan for program staff to develop one-on-one relationships with teen fathers; offer a comprehensive array of services to teen fathers; begin with a theoretical program model; delivered services...

    This report discusses the outcomes of a research review that evaluated evidence-based research findings on teen fatherhood programs and identified effective programs. It begins by emphasizing the importance of teen fatherhood programs, discussing barriers to teen participation in programs, and explaining principles that were used to identify rigorous research on effective teen fatherhood programs and the criteria used for considering fatherhood programs for the review. Different types of teen fatherhood programs are described, along with ten characteristics of effective teen fatherhood programs drawn from four teen fatherhood programs that were considered effective: Young Dads, a prenatal education intervention, Respecting and Protecting our Relationships, and the STEP-UP program. Effective programs were found to partner with community organizations to help recruit and engage teen fathers; plan for program staff to develop one-on-one relationships with teen fathers; offer a comprehensive array of services to teen fathers; begin with a theoretical program model; delivered services in engaging and interactive ways; conduct a needs assessment and/or use participant feedback in order to provide teen fathers the services they want; look for staff that are experienced, empathetic, enthusiastic, and well-connected in the community; incorporate teaching methods and materials that are appropriate for teen fathers and their culture and age; use an incentive with teen fathers and their families; and mentor teen fathers. Emerging practices from teen fatherhood programs are also discussed. Appendices describe 1 model teen fatherhood program, 3 promising programs, and 14 emerging teen fatherhood programs. Each description includes information on the program's goals, targeted population, evaluation design, structure, content, design, and evaluation findings. Numerous references. (Child Welfare Information Gateway abstract)

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