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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Powers, Rebecca S.; Livermore, Michelle M.; Davis, Belinda C.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    With no federal entitlement to cash assistance, some unemployed welfare leavers have no obvious means of support. This article compares former Louisiana's Strategies to Empower People (STEP) participants who are disconnected from employment and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) to those who are connected. Logistic regressions show that disconnected welfare leavers are more likely to have transportation problems, live rent free, and engage in informal employment. They are less likely to report a health problem or have a child with poor health, share living expenses, or receive cash help from family and friends. Contributions to the literature and policy initiatives are discussed. (author abstract)

    With no federal entitlement to cash assistance, some unemployed welfare leavers have no obvious means of support. This article compares former Louisiana's Strategies to Empower People (STEP) participants who are disconnected from employment and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) to those who are connected. Logistic regressions show that disconnected welfare leavers are more likely to have transportation problems, live rent free, and engage in informal employment. They are less likely to report a health problem or have a child with poor health, share living expenses, or receive cash help from family and friends. Contributions to the literature and policy initiatives are discussed. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Davis, Belinda Creel; Lim, Younghee; Livermore, Michelle
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    This study asserts that the type of work activity in which a Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) participant engages affects the likelihood of employment and post-program earnings. Using a Heckman selection model on administrative data from Louisiana's social service office and unemployment insurance wage data and controlling for individual and parish characteristics, this study reveals that two work activities, on-the-job training and unsubsidized employment, are associated with an increased probability of employment. Further, unsubsidized employment, on-the-job training, and vocational education are positively associated with earnings, while job search, school attendance, and work experience are negatively associated with earnings. (author abstract)

    This study asserts that the type of work activity in which a Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) participant engages affects the likelihood of employment and post-program earnings. Using a Heckman selection model on administrative data from Louisiana's social service office and unemployment insurance wage data and controlling for individual and parish characteristics, this study reveals that two work activities, on-the-job training and unsubsidized employment, are associated with an increased probability of employment. Further, unsubsidized employment, on-the-job training, and vocational education are positively associated with earnings, while job search, school attendance, and work experience are negatively associated with earnings. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lindhorst, Taryn; Mancoske, Ronald J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2006

    A central feature of the reforms enacted through the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (welfare reform) has been the adoption of strategies to involuntarily remove Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) recipients from the welfare rolls, including increased use of sanctions and time limits on welfare receipt. Drawing on data from a three year panel study of women who had been receiving welfare in a state which adopted stringent sanctioning and time limit policies, we investigate predictors of recipients’ TANF status after implementation of welfare reform, and identify differences in post-reform material resources, hardships and quality of life based on TANF status. Almost half of all welfare case closures during the first time period after reforms were implemented through involuntary strategies. Relatively few baseline characteristics predicted different outcomes once welfare time limits and sanctions were implemented. Those who were timed off welfare had substantially lower incomes in the year following their removal. One third of all...

    A central feature of the reforms enacted through the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (welfare reform) has been the adoption of strategies to involuntarily remove Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) recipients from the welfare rolls, including increased use of sanctions and time limits on welfare receipt. Drawing on data from a three year panel study of women who had been receiving welfare in a state which adopted stringent sanctioning and time limit policies, we investigate predictors of recipients’ TANF status after implementation of welfare reform, and identify differences in post-reform material resources, hardships and quality of life based on TANF status. Almost half of all welfare case closures during the first time period after reforms were implemented through involuntary strategies. Relatively few baseline characteristics predicted different outcomes once welfare time limits and sanctions were implemented. Those who were timed off welfare had substantially lower incomes in the year following their removal. One third of all respondents, regardless of reason for leaving TANF reported having insufficient food, housing problems and lack of access to needed medical care. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Office of Inspector General
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    This report examines the processes used by State Child Support Enforcement and TANF agencies to transfer current child support payments to custodial parents upon exit from TANF. We also examined the processes States use to distribute child support to current TANF recipients. All data collection occurred between February and April 2001. We focused our case file review on the transfer of support in paying cases. We did not examine TANF and CSE agencies’ enforcement efforts to collect support for families in non-paying cases. (author introduction)

    This report examines the processes used by State Child Support Enforcement and TANF agencies to transfer current child support payments to custodial parents upon exit from TANF. We also examined the processes States use to distribute child support to current TANF recipients. All data collection occurred between February and April 2001. We focused our case file review on the transfer of support in paying cases. We did not examine TANF and CSE agencies’ enforcement efforts to collect support for families in non-paying cases. (author introduction)