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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Snell-Rood, Claire; Feltner, Frances; Schoenberg, Nancy
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    The prevalence of depression among rural women is nearly twice the national average, yet limited mental health services and extensive social barriers restrict access to needed treatment. We conducted key informant interviews with community health workers (CHWs) and diverse health care professionals who provide care to Appalachian women with depression to better understand the potential roles that CHWs may play to improve women’s treatment engagement. In the gap created by service disparities and social barriers, CHWs can offer a substantial contribution through improving recognition of depression; deepening rural women’s engagement within existing services; and offering sustained, culturally appropriate support. (Author abstract)

    The prevalence of depression among rural women is nearly twice the national average, yet limited mental health services and extensive social barriers restrict access to needed treatment. We conducted key informant interviews with community health workers (CHWs) and diverse health care professionals who provide care to Appalachian women with depression to better understand the potential roles that CHWs may play to improve women’s treatment engagement. In the gap created by service disparities and social barriers, CHWs can offer a substantial contribution through improving recognition of depression; deepening rural women’s engagement within existing services; and offering sustained, culturally appropriate support. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lam, Onyi; Broderick, Brian; Toor, Skye
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Rural Americans are more likely than people in urban and suburban areas to say access to good doctors and hospitals is a major problem in their community. Nearly a quarter (23%) of Americans in rural areas say this, compared with 18% of urbanites and 9% of suburbanites, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted earlier this year. (Edited author introduction)

    Rural Americans are more likely than people in urban and suburban areas to say access to good doctors and hospitals is a major problem in their community. Nearly a quarter (23%) of Americans in rural areas say this, compared with 18% of urbanites and 9% of suburbanites, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted earlier this year. (Edited author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Using data combined from the 2013–2015 National Health Interview Surveys, this brief examines characteristics of individuals with Medicaid coverage—children and adults—in rural areas, as well as their access to care and use of services, comparing their experience to their privately insured and uninsured counterparts. We also compare access and use between Medicaid beneficiaries in urban and rural areas, and by disability. (Edited author introduction)

     

    Using data combined from the 2013–2015 National Health Interview Surveys, this brief examines characteristics of individuals with Medicaid coverage—children and adults—in rural areas, as well as their access to care and use of services, comparing their experience to their privately insured and uninsured counterparts. We also compare access and use between Medicaid beneficiaries in urban and rural areas, and by disability. (Edited author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Eismann, Emily A.; Theuerling, Jack; Maguire, Sabine; Hente, Elizabeth A.; Shapiro, Robert A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    This project sought to assess the generalizability, barriers, and facilitators of implementing the Safe Environment for Every Kid (SEEK) model for addressing psychosocial risk factors for maltreatment across multiple primary care settings, including a pediatric practice, federally qualified health center, and family medicine practice. The SEEK model includes screening caregivers for psychosocial risk factors at well-child visits age 0 to 5 years, brief intervention incorporating principles of motivational interviewing to engage caregivers, and referral to treatment. All practices successfully implemented SEEK, with screening completion rates from 75% to 93% and brief intervention rates from 61% to 81%. Major parental stress (14%) and food insecurity (11%) were the most common risk factors. Providers found SEEK worthwhile for improving their knowledge, skills, and ability to address psychosocial concerns and provide whole person care. Barriers included limited time and resources, incomplete resource knowledge, and lack of follow-up. Facilitators included on-site support staff to...

    This project sought to assess the generalizability, barriers, and facilitators of implementing the Safe Environment for Every Kid (SEEK) model for addressing psychosocial risk factors for maltreatment across multiple primary care settings, including a pediatric practice, federally qualified health center, and family medicine practice. The SEEK model includes screening caregivers for psychosocial risk factors at well-child visits age 0 to 5 years, brief intervention incorporating principles of motivational interviewing to engage caregivers, and referral to treatment. All practices successfully implemented SEEK, with screening completion rates from 75% to 93% and brief intervention rates from 61% to 81%. Major parental stress (14%) and food insecurity (11%) were the most common risk factors. Providers found SEEK worthwhile for improving their knowledge, skills, and ability to address psychosocial concerns and provide whole person care. Barriers included limited time and resources, incomplete resource knowledge, and lack of follow-up. Facilitators included on-site support staff to assist with communication and referrals. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Foutz, Julia; Artiga, Samantha; Garfield, Rachel
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    People in rural areas face unique challenges in health care coverage and access, including low density of providers and longer travel times to care, limited access to employer-sponsored coverage, and greater health care needs due to older age and lower income. Medicaid plays an important role in helping to address these challenges. This brief provides insight into the role of Medicaid in rural areas and discusses how expansions or reductions in Medicaid such as those currently under debate could affect rural areas. The analysis is based on data from the 2013-2015 American Community Survey and classifies counties as “rural” based on an Index of Relative Rurality (IRR). We group counties into quintiles of rurality and define those with the highest degree of rurality as “rural,” those with the lowest degree as “urban,” and those in the middle as “other.” While Medicaid provides assistance to many low-income elderly individuals, primarily as a wrap-around benefit to Medicare, this analysis focuses on its role in covering nonelderly children and adults. The analysis shows that...

    People in rural areas face unique challenges in health care coverage and access, including low density of providers and longer travel times to care, limited access to employer-sponsored coverage, and greater health care needs due to older age and lower income. Medicaid plays an important role in helping to address these challenges. This brief provides insight into the role of Medicaid in rural areas and discusses how expansions or reductions in Medicaid such as those currently under debate could affect rural areas. The analysis is based on data from the 2013-2015 American Community Survey and classifies counties as “rural” based on an Index of Relative Rurality (IRR). We group counties into quintiles of rurality and define those with the highest degree of rurality as “rural,” those with the lowest degree as “urban,” and those in the middle as “other.” While Medicaid provides assistance to many low-income elderly individuals, primarily as a wrap-around benefit to Medicare, this analysis focuses on its role in covering nonelderly children and adults. The analysis shows that Medicaid plays a particularly important role providing coverage in rural areas and that gains in Medicaid coverage have helped reduce the uninsured rate in rural areas. More detail on the methods underlying the analysis is available in the “methods” box at the end of the brief. (Author introduction)

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