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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Morgenstern, Jon; Neighbors, Charles J.; Kuerbis, Alexis; Riordan, Annette; Blanchard, Kimberly A.; McVeigh, Katharine H.; Morgan, Thomas J.; McCrady, Barbara
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    The authors examined abstinence rates among substance-dependent women receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) in intensive case management (ICM) over 24 months and whether ICM yielded significantly better employment outcomes compared with a screen-and-refer program (i.e., usual care). Substance-dependent (n = 302) and non–substance dependent (n = 150) TANF applicants in Essex County, New Jersey, were recruited. Substance-dependent women were randomly assigned to ICM or usual care. The researchers interviewed all women at 3, 9, 15, and 24 months. Findings were that the Abstinence rates were higher for the ICM group than for the usual care group through 24 months of follow-up (odds ratio [OR] = 2.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.36, 3.29). A statistically significant interaction between time and group on number of days employed indicated that the rate of improvement over time in employment was greater for the ICM group than for the usual care group (incidence rate ratio = 1.03; 95% CI = 1.02, 1.04). Additionally, there were greater odds of being employed full...

    The authors examined abstinence rates among substance-dependent women receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) in intensive case management (ICM) over 24 months and whether ICM yielded significantly better employment outcomes compared with a screen-and-refer program (i.e., usual care). Substance-dependent (n = 302) and non–substance dependent (n = 150) TANF applicants in Essex County, New Jersey, were recruited. Substance-dependent women were randomly assigned to ICM or usual care. The researchers interviewed all women at 3, 9, 15, and 24 months. Findings were that the Abstinence rates were higher for the ICM group than for the usual care group through 24 months of follow-up (odds ratio [OR] = 2.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.36, 3.29). A statistically significant interaction between time and group on number of days employed indicated that the rate of improvement over time in employment was greater for the ICM group than for the usual care group (incidence rate ratio = 1.03; 95% CI = 1.02, 1.04). Additionally, there were greater odds of being employed full time for those in the ICM group (OR = 1.68; 95% CI = 1.12, 2.51). ICM was found to be a promising intervention for managing substance dependence among women receiving TANF and for improving employment rates among this vulnerable population. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Miller, Cynthia; Bos, Johannes ; Porter, Kristin; Tseng, Fannie M.; Abe, Yasuyo
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    The Center for Employment Training (CET), headquartered in San Jose, California, gained the attention of policymakers in the early 1990s, when it proved to be the only training program in two major evaluations (one of which, JOBSTART, targeted disadvantaged youth) to produce large positive effects on participants’ employment and earnings. Such documented success is rare among employment and training programs in general, but it is especially unusual among programs serving youth.

    The Evaluation of the Center for Employment Training Replication Sites –– initiated and funded by the U.S. Department of Labor –– sought to build on this remarkable performance by testing the CET model on out-of-school youth beyond its traditional base in San Jose. This final report in a series evaluating the replication effort presents findings after four and a half years of follow-up. It shows that, even in the sites that best implemented the model, CET had no overall employment and earnings effects for youth in the program, even though it increased participants’ hours of training and receipt of...

    The Center for Employment Training (CET), headquartered in San Jose, California, gained the attention of policymakers in the early 1990s, when it proved to be the only training program in two major evaluations (one of which, JOBSTART, targeted disadvantaged youth) to produce large positive effects on participants’ employment and earnings. Such documented success is rare among employment and training programs in general, but it is especially unusual among programs serving youth.

    The Evaluation of the Center for Employment Training Replication Sites –– initiated and funded by the U.S. Department of Labor –– sought to build on this remarkable performance by testing the CET model on out-of-school youth beyond its traditional base in San Jose. This final report in a series evaluating the replication effort presents findings after four and a half years of follow-up. It shows that, even in the sites that best implemented the model, CET had no overall employment and earnings effects for youth in the program, even though it increased participants’ hours of training and receipt of credentials. (Edited author preface)

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