Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Covington, Reginald D.; Goesling, Brian; Clark Tuttle, Christina ; Crofton, Molly; Manlove, Jennifer; Oman, Roy F.; Vesely, Sara
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report presents the final impact findings from a large-scale demonstration project and evaluation of POWER Through Choices (PTC), a comprehensive sexual health education curriculum designed specifically for youth in foster care, the juvenile justice system, and other out-of-home care settings. Prior research indicates that youth in out-of-home care are at particularly high risk for teen pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and associated sexual risk behaviors (Dworsky and Courtney 2010). However, many of these youth report difficulty accessing reproductive health information and services (Freundlich 2003; Crottogini et al. 2008), as well as relatively low levels of knowledge about reproductive health and methods of protection (Hudson 2012). PTC is one of the only comprehensive sexual health education curricula designed to address the needs and risks specific to this population. (Author abstract)

    This report presents the final impact findings from a large-scale demonstration project and evaluation of POWER Through Choices (PTC), a comprehensive sexual health education curriculum designed specifically for youth in foster care, the juvenile justice system, and other out-of-home care settings. Prior research indicates that youth in out-of-home care are at particularly high risk for teen pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and associated sexual risk behaviors (Dworsky and Courtney 2010). However, many of these youth report difficulty accessing reproductive health information and services (Freundlich 2003; Crottogini et al. 2008), as well as relatively low levels of knowledge about reproductive health and methods of protection (Hudson 2012). PTC is one of the only comprehensive sexual health education curricula designed to address the needs and risks specific to this population. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lundquist, Erika ; Hsueh, JoAnn ; Lowenstein, Amy E. ; Faucetta, Kristen; Gubits, Daniel ; Michalopoulos, Charles; Knox, Virginia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This report provides an overview of the Supporting Healthy Marriage program model and includes final (30-month) impact findings on a range of outcomes including marital stability, relationship quality, co-parenting, and adult and child well-being. The report indicates that the program did not increase the likelihood that couples stayed together. The program did produce small positive effects in the relationship quality domain, but it did not improve co-parenting or measurably benefit children. The Technical Supplement report presents supporting technical documentation related to the study design and analyses (e.g., analytic methods, variable construction, etc.) (author abstract)

    This report provides an overview of the Supporting Healthy Marriage program model and includes final (30-month) impact findings on a range of outcomes including marital stability, relationship quality, co-parenting, and adult and child well-being. The report indicates that the program did not increase the likelihood that couples stayed together. The program did produce small positive effects in the relationship quality domain, but it did not improve co-parenting or measurably benefit children. The Technical Supplement report presents supporting technical documentation related to the study design and analyses (e.g., analytic methods, variable construction, etc.) (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gubits, Daniel; Lowenstein, Amy; Harris, Jorgen; Hsueh, JoAnn
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    The Supporting Healthy Marriage (SHM) evaluation was launched in 2003 to test the effectiveness of a skills-based relationship education program designed to help low-and modest-income married couples strengthen their relationships and to support more stable and more nurturing home environments and more positive outcomes for parents and their children. The evaluation was led by MDRC with Abt Associates and other partners, and it was sponsored by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation in the Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. This paper presents the results of an exploratory analysis that examines whether SHM program impacts vary by six subgroup-defining characteristics.

    SHM was a voluntary, yearlong, marriage education program for lower-income, married couples who had children or were expecting a child. The program provided group workshops based on structured curricula; supplemental activities to build on workshop themes; and family support services to address participation barriers, connect families with other...

    The Supporting Healthy Marriage (SHM) evaluation was launched in 2003 to test the effectiveness of a skills-based relationship education program designed to help low-and modest-income married couples strengthen their relationships and to support more stable and more nurturing home environments and more positive outcomes for parents and their children. The evaluation was led by MDRC with Abt Associates and other partners, and it was sponsored by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation in the Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. This paper presents the results of an exploratory analysis that examines whether SHM program impacts vary by six subgroup-defining characteristics.

    SHM was a voluntary, yearlong, marriage education program for lower-income, married couples who had children or were expecting a child. The program provided group workshops based on structured curricula; supplemental activities to build on workshop themes; and family support services to address participation barriers, connect families with other services, and reinforce curricular themes. The study’s random assignment design compared outcomes for families who were offered SHM’s services with outcomes for a similar group of families who were not offered SHM’s services but could access other services in the community.

    The study’s main impact reports limited subgroup analysis to three potential moderators of impacts 12 months and 30 months after couples entered the study: couples’ level of marital distress, family income-­to-poverty level, and race/ethnicity. This paper explores whether the impacts of the SHM program on marital quality and stability outcomes differ according to six additional subgroup-defining characteris­tics at the 12-and 30-month follow-up points: (1) length of marriage at study entry, (2) experience of abuse or neglect in the family of origin, (3) psychological distress at study entry, (4) whether the extended family respects and values the couple’s marriage, (5) presence of a stepchild in the household, and (6) presence of a young child (under 3) in the household. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lowenstein, Amy E. ; Altman, Noemi ; Chou, Patricia M. ; Faucetta, Kristen ; Greeney, Adam ; Gubits, Daniel ; Harris, Jorgen ; Hsueh, JoAnn ; Lundquist, Erika ; Michalopoulos, Charles ; Nguyen, Vinh Q.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This technical supplement to the evaluation’s 30-month final impact report provides additional details about the study’s research design, data sources, measures construction, outcome and subgroup measures, analytic approach, and sensitivity and robustness tests of the impact estimates.  It also presents supplemental analyses of impacts by program and subgroup and on additional child, parenting and adult outcomes. (author abstract)

    This technical supplement to the evaluation’s 30-month final impact report provides additional details about the study’s research design, data sources, measures construction, outcome and subgroup measures, analytic approach, and sensitivity and robustness tests of the impact estimates.  It also presents supplemental analyses of impacts by program and subgroup and on additional child, parenting and adult outcomes. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wood, Robert G.; Moore, Quinn; Clarkwest, Andrew; Killewald, Alexandra; Monahan, Shannon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The Building Strong Families (BSF) evaluation assessed the impacts of eight programs offering a similar model of healthy marriage and relationship skills and support services to interested low-income unmarried parents around the time of the birth of a child.  While many unmarried parents live together when their children are born, their relationships are often tenuous and most end within a few years of the child’s birth. Research suggests that children do better when raised by both of their parents in healthy environments.  The BSF program model included curricula-based group workshops on relationship skills; individual support from family coordinators; and assessment and referral to other needed services. The key question addressed through the BSF evaluation is whether the interventions improved the quality of unmarried parents’ relationships, increased the likelihood that they remained together, and improved the well-being of children. This report presents final impact results from data collected 36 months after couples enrolled in the study.  A separate technical supplement...

    The Building Strong Families (BSF) evaluation assessed the impacts of eight programs offering a similar model of healthy marriage and relationship skills and support services to interested low-income unmarried parents around the time of the birth of a child.  While many unmarried parents live together when their children are born, their relationships are often tenuous and most end within a few years of the child’s birth. Research suggests that children do better when raised by both of their parents in healthy environments.  The BSF program model included curricula-based group workshops on relationship skills; individual support from family coordinators; and assessment and referral to other needed services. The key question addressed through the BSF evaluation is whether the interventions improved the quality of unmarried parents’ relationships, increased the likelihood that they remained together, and improved the well-being of children. This report presents final impact results from data collected 36 months after couples enrolled in the study.  A separate technical supplement details the analytic approaches and includes additional analyses. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2006 to 2016

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations