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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Dworsky, Amy; Dasgupta, Denali
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    In 2008, the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act gave states the option to extend the age of eligibility for federally funded foster care to 21. Twenty-five states and the District of Columbia have extended or are in the process of extending federally funded foster care with a safe, stable, and developmentally appropriate place to live. There are gaps in our knowledge of best practices for housing young adults in extended care, the housing options currently available to those young adults, and how those options vary across and within states. This brief begins to address these knowledge gaps by gathering information form a purposive sample of officials from public child welfare agencies in states that have extended federally funded foster care to age 21 and a group of stakeholders who attended a convening on the topic. The brief also highlights suggestions for future research. (Author abstract)

    In 2008, the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act gave states the option to extend the age of eligibility for federally funded foster care to 21. Twenty-five states and the District of Columbia have extended or are in the process of extending federally funded foster care with a safe, stable, and developmentally appropriate place to live. There are gaps in our knowledge of best practices for housing young adults in extended care, the housing options currently available to those young adults, and how those options vary across and within states. This brief begins to address these knowledge gaps by gathering information form a purposive sample of officials from public child welfare agencies in states that have extended federally funded foster care to age 21 and a group of stakeholders who attended a convening on the topic. The brief also highlights suggestions for future research. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Benton, Amanda; Dunton, Lauren; Khadduri, Jill; Walton, Douglas
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Reid, Megan; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Hawkins, Alan J.; Manno, Michelle S.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    There is a growing interest in policies and programs that assist low-income fathers to stay involved with their children. Numerous programs have been developed to serve low-income fathers and their families, yet few of these programs have been rigorously evaluated. This panel examined the interventions and findings for a selection of rigorous evaluations to determine program effects. Megan Reid (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. (author introduction)

    There is a growing interest in policies and programs that assist low-income fathers to stay involved with their children. Numerous programs have been developed to serve low-income fathers and their families, yet few of these programs have been rigorously evaluated. This panel examined the interventions and findings for a selection of rigorous evaluations to determine program effects. Megan Reid (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Meyer, Aleta; Abrahamson-Richards, Tess; Barofsky, Meryl; Sarche, Michelle
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). A scientifically rigorous study increases the confidence with which conclusions can be drawn and alternative explanations ruled out. Recently there has been a focus on context as a necessary component of rigor often overlooked when internal validity is emphasized. Contextual rigor can be defined as consideration and respect for the local culture or context as foundational to evaluation design and implementation. Moderated by Aleta Meyer (Administration for Children and Families), this panel discussion highlighted three OPRE funded studies that are more scientifically rigorous because of their contextual rigor. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). A scientifically rigorous study increases the confidence with which conclusions can be drawn and alternative explanations ruled out. Recently there has been a focus on context as a necessary component of rigor often overlooked when internal validity is emphasized. Contextual rigor can be defined as consideration and respect for the local culture or context as foundational to evaluation design and implementation. Moderated by Aleta Meyer (Administration for Children and Families), this panel discussion highlighted three OPRE funded studies that are more scientifically rigorous because of their contextual rigor. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: King, Yemimah A.; Fite, Paula J.; Poquiz, Jonathan L.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    It is important to understand the role of sources of parental knowledge within the context of perceived neighborhood safety, which has clear implications for how parents should effectively gain knowledge of youth behavior depending on the perceived safety of the neighborhood in which they reside. The current study examined perceived neighborhood safety as a moderator of the relation between sources of parental knowledge (i.e., child disclosure, parental solicitation, and parental control) and child delinquency in a community-recruited sample of 89 children (56% male) ranging from 9 to 12 years of age (M = 10.44). Youth and their primary caregiver (85% mothers) responded to survey items. Findings suggested that the link between child disclosure and delinquent behavior was moderated by perceived neighborhood safety, such that the link between child disclosure and lower levels of delinquency weakens in neighborhoods perceived as less safe. In contrast, the link between parental solicitation and delinquency strengthened in neighborhoods perceived as less safe using both child and...

    It is important to understand the role of sources of parental knowledge within the context of perceived neighborhood safety, which has clear implications for how parents should effectively gain knowledge of youth behavior depending on the perceived safety of the neighborhood in which they reside. The current study examined perceived neighborhood safety as a moderator of the relation between sources of parental knowledge (i.e., child disclosure, parental solicitation, and parental control) and child delinquency in a community-recruited sample of 89 children (56% male) ranging from 9 to 12 years of age (M = 10.44). Youth and their primary caregiver (85% mothers) responded to survey items. Findings suggested that the link between child disclosure and delinquent behavior was moderated by perceived neighborhood safety, such that the link between child disclosure and lower levels of delinquency weakens in neighborhoods perceived as less safe. In contrast, the link between parental solicitation and delinquency strengthened in neighborhoods perceived as less safe using both child and parent reports of delinquency, such that more solicitation was associated with higher levels of delinquent activity. Perceived neighborhood safety did not have a moderating effect on the relation between parental control and child-reported or parent-reported delinquency. Future directions are discussed. (Author abstract)

     

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