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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Nunn, Ryan; Parsons, Jana; Shambaugh, Jay
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2019

    A new Hamilton Project interactive map, based on work from a recent Hamilton Project paper (The Geography of Prosperity), enables users to explore—down to the state and county level—where and how places are struggling or thriving throughout the United States. The Hamilton Project’s Vitality Index is a measure of a place’s economic and social wellbeing. It combines a county’s median household income, poverty rate, unemployment rate, prime-age employment rate, life expectancy, and housing vacancy rate. (Edited author introduction)

     

    A new Hamilton Project interactive map, based on work from a recent Hamilton Project paper (The Geography of Prosperity), enables users to explore—down to the state and county level—where and how places are struggling or thriving throughout the United States. The Hamilton Project’s Vitality Index is a measure of a place’s economic and social wellbeing. It combines a county’s median household income, poverty rate, unemployment rate, prime-age employment rate, life expectancy, and housing vacancy rate. (Edited author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: United States Census Bureau
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    In 2014, the U.S. Census Bureau released an infographic titled Measuring America: How Census Measures Poverty, which describes the official poverty measure and supplemental poverty measure and highlights differences in the two measures. The infographic also includes differences in the official and SPM 2012 poverty rates by age group, geographic differences in the SPM 2012 poverty thresholds, and more.

    In 2014, the U.S. Census Bureau released an infographic titled Measuring America: How Census Measures Poverty, which describes the official poverty measure and supplemental poverty measure and highlights differences in the two measures. The infographic also includes differences in the official and SPM 2012 poverty rates by age group, geographic differences in the SPM 2012 poverty thresholds, and more.

  • Individual Author: United States Census Bureau
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    President Johnson’s 1964 declaration of his “War on Poverty” generated a new interest in measuring just how many people were in poverty and how those numbers changed from year to year. The next year the Office of Economic Opportunity adopted a working definition of poverty based on a methodology for counting the poor that had been proposed by Mollie Orshansky, an analyst at the Social Security Administration. In 1967, the Census Bureau published its first set of poverty estimates.

    Two years later, the Office of Management and Budget issued a memorandum that established the nation’s “official” poverty measure and changed the Census Bureau with responsibility for providing annual poverty estimates. Over the past fifty years, there have been numerous efforts to improve the official poverty measure, including an Interagency Poverty Studies Task Force in the 1970s and a National Academy of Science’s expert panel in the 1990s. These efforts triggered research by economists at the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics resulting in the November 2011 publication of...

    President Johnson’s 1964 declaration of his “War on Poverty” generated a new interest in measuring just how many people were in poverty and how those numbers changed from year to year. The next year the Office of Economic Opportunity adopted a working definition of poverty based on a methodology for counting the poor that had been proposed by Mollie Orshansky, an analyst at the Social Security Administration. In 1967, the Census Bureau published its first set of poverty estimates.

    Two years later, the Office of Management and Budget issued a memorandum that established the nation’s “official” poverty measure and changed the Census Bureau with responsibility for providing annual poverty estimates. Over the past fifty years, there have been numerous efforts to improve the official poverty measure, including an Interagency Poverty Studies Task Force in the 1970s and a National Academy of Science’s expert panel in the 1990s. These efforts triggered research by economists at the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics resulting in the November 2011 publication of poverty estimates using a new “Supplemental Poverty Measure.” For the past three years, the Census Bureau has published two sets of national poverty estimates, one using the official method and one using the Supplemental Poverty Measure. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Heggeness, Misty L.; Flood, Sarah; Pacas, José D.
    Year: 2013

    This paper pools the American Time Use Survey (ATUS-X) and the Current Population Survey (CPS) Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) from 2003 to 2011 to estimate time poverty rates for parents within the United States. We estimate poverty rates by income, time and a combination of both for diverse household configurations. (author introduction)

    This paper pools the American Time Use Survey (ATUS-X) and the Current Population Survey (CPS) Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) from 2003 to 2011 to estimate time poverty rates for parents within the United States. We estimate poverty rates by income, time and a combination of both for diverse household configurations. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Betson, David; Giannarelli, Linda; Zedlewski, Sheila R.
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2011

    This workshop discussed issues surrounding the potential development of a Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM) at the state level using the American Community Survey (ACS).  Academics and researchers from around the country participated, including experts that have implemented the SPM for eight different areas. The discussion summarized recent experiences and challenges in implementing the SPM on the ACS and geographic adjustments to the poverty thresholds. The summary highlights the key issues and ideas for next steps. (author abstract)

    This workshop discussed issues surrounding the potential development of a Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM) at the state level using the American Community Survey (ACS).  Academics and researchers from around the country participated, including experts that have implemented the SPM for eight different areas. The discussion summarized recent experiences and challenges in implementing the SPM on the ACS and geographic adjustments to the poverty thresholds. The summary highlights the key issues and ideas for next steps. (author abstract)