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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: United States Census Bureau
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    In 2014, the U.S. Census Bureau released an infographic titled Measuring America: How Census Measures Poverty, which describes the official poverty measure and supplemental poverty measure and highlights differences in the two measures. The infographic also includes differences in the official and SPM 2012 poverty rates by age group, geographic differences in the SPM 2012 poverty thresholds, and more.

    In 2014, the U.S. Census Bureau released an infographic titled Measuring America: How Census Measures Poverty, which describes the official poverty measure and supplemental poverty measure and highlights differences in the two measures. The infographic also includes differences in the official and SPM 2012 poverty rates by age group, geographic differences in the SPM 2012 poverty thresholds, and more.

  • Individual Author: United States Census Bureau
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    President Johnson’s 1964 declaration of his “War on Poverty” generated a new interest in measuring just how many people were in poverty and how those numbers changed from year to year. The next year the Office of Economic Opportunity adopted a working definition of poverty based on a methodology for counting the poor that had been proposed by Mollie Orshansky, an analyst at the Social Security Administration. In 1967, the Census Bureau published its first set of poverty estimates.

    Two years later, the Office of Management and Budget issued a memorandum that established the nation’s “official” poverty measure and changed the Census Bureau with responsibility for providing annual poverty estimates. Over the past fifty years, there have been numerous efforts to improve the official poverty measure, including an Interagency Poverty Studies Task Force in the 1970s and a National Academy of Science’s expert panel in the 1990s. These efforts triggered research by economists at the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics resulting in the November 2011 publication of...

    President Johnson’s 1964 declaration of his “War on Poverty” generated a new interest in measuring just how many people were in poverty and how those numbers changed from year to year. The next year the Office of Economic Opportunity adopted a working definition of poverty based on a methodology for counting the poor that had been proposed by Mollie Orshansky, an analyst at the Social Security Administration. In 1967, the Census Bureau published its first set of poverty estimates.

    Two years later, the Office of Management and Budget issued a memorandum that established the nation’s “official” poverty measure and changed the Census Bureau with responsibility for providing annual poverty estimates. Over the past fifty years, there have been numerous efforts to improve the official poverty measure, including an Interagency Poverty Studies Task Force in the 1970s and a National Academy of Science’s expert panel in the 1990s. These efforts triggered research by economists at the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics resulting in the November 2011 publication of poverty estimates using a new “Supplemental Poverty Measure.” For the past three years, the Census Bureau has published two sets of national poverty estimates, one using the official method and one using the Supplemental Poverty Measure. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Heggeness, Misty L.; Flood, Sarah; Pacas, José D.
    Year: 2013

    This paper pools the American Time Use Survey (ATUS-X) and the Current Population Survey (CPS) Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) from 2003 to 2011 to estimate time poverty rates for parents within the United States. We estimate poverty rates by income, time and a combination of both for diverse household configurations. (author introduction)

    This paper pools the American Time Use Survey (ATUS-X) and the Current Population Survey (CPS) Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) from 2003 to 2011 to estimate time poverty rates for parents within the United States. We estimate poverty rates by income, time and a combination of both for diverse household configurations. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Interagency Technical Working Group
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2010

    Since the official U.S. poverty measure was first published in 1964, there has been continuing debate about alternative approaches to the measurement of poverty. Recognizing that alternative statistics can provide useful information, the Office of Management and Budget’s Chief Statistician formed an Interagency Technical Working Group on Developing a Supplemental Poverty Measure including representatives from BLS, the Census Bureau, the Council of Economic Advisers, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Health and Human Services, and OMB. The Working Group was charged with developing a set of initial starting points to permit the U.S. Census Bureau, in cooperation with the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), to produce a Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM). The new supplemental measure would be published initially in the fall of 2011 at the same time and detail as the 2010 income and poverty statistics that contain the official poverty measure, and annually thereafter. The President’s 2011 Budget proposes resources to support this activity in the budgets of the Census Bureau...

    Since the official U.S. poverty measure was first published in 1964, there has been continuing debate about alternative approaches to the measurement of poverty. Recognizing that alternative statistics can provide useful information, the Office of Management and Budget’s Chief Statistician formed an Interagency Technical Working Group on Developing a Supplemental Poverty Measure including representatives from BLS, the Census Bureau, the Council of Economic Advisers, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Health and Human Services, and OMB. The Working Group was charged with developing a set of initial starting points to permit the U.S. Census Bureau, in cooperation with the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), to produce a Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM). The new supplemental measure would be published initially in the fall of 2011 at the same time and detail as the 2010 income and poverty statistics that contain the official poverty measure, and annually thereafter. The President’s 2011 Budget proposes resources to support this activity in the budgets of the Census Bureau and the BLS. Although the outcome of the 2011 appropriations process is unknown, developing and estimating an SPM will take substantial advance work and planning and the Working Group’s observations are meant to assist the Census Bureau and the BLS in such planning...

    This document provides observations about how to make a series of initial choices in the development of the SPM. These observations reflect discussions and recommendations made by the technical working group to the Chief Statistician in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget and the Under Secretary for Economic Affairs in the U.S. Department of Commerce. In cases where there was not consensus within the Working Group, these two individuals made choices that are reflected in the specific recommendations provided. (author's introduction)

  • Individual Author: Nelson, Charles
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2006

    The author summarizes the differences between income and poverty estimates derived from the Current Population Survey and the American Community Survey. These differences arise from different modes of data collection, reference periods, details in the questionnaires, samples sizes, survey universes, definition of families, and residence rules.

    The author summarizes the differences between income and poverty estimates derived from the Current Population Survey and the American Community Survey. These differences arise from different modes of data collection, reference periods, details in the questionnaires, samples sizes, survey universes, definition of families, and residence rules.