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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Derr, Michelle; Laird, Elizabeth; Kirby, Gretchen; Lyskawa, Julia
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2013

    This presentation describes a study to explore what factors influence client participation in work activities and what strategies states and localities have used to increase participation in work or work-related activities. Data was collected from site visits (11 communities), telephone interviews (30 TANF administrators), and document reviews (policy manuals, etc.).

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    This presentation describes a study to explore what factors influence client participation in work activities and what strategies states and localities have used to increase participation in work or work-related activities. Data was collected from site visits (11 communities), telephone interviews (30 TANF administrators), and document reviews (policy manuals, etc.).

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Gennetian, Lisa A.; Miller, Cynthia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    In 1994, the state of Minnesota began a major welfare reform initiative aimed at encouraging work, reducing dependence on public assistance, and reducing poverty. The Minnesota Family Investment Program (MFIP) differed from the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) system in three key ways: (1) Financial incentives to work. In MFIP, more earnings were disregarded when calculating grant levels, and child care payments were paid directly to providers; (2) Participation requirements for long-term recipients. If not working full time, long-term welfare recipients had to participate in services designed to move them quickly into the workforce., and; (3) Simplification of rules and procedures. MFIP combined AFDC, Food Stamps, and the state-run Family General Assistance (FGA) program into a single program with one set of rules and procedures and one monthly payment.

    A central concern surrounding the recent wave of welfare reforms is how children will fare if their parents are subject to such policies as work mandates, time limits, and enhanced earnings disregards....

    In 1994, the state of Minnesota began a major welfare reform initiative aimed at encouraging work, reducing dependence on public assistance, and reducing poverty. The Minnesota Family Investment Program (MFIP) differed from the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) system in three key ways: (1) Financial incentives to work. In MFIP, more earnings were disregarded when calculating grant levels, and child care payments were paid directly to providers; (2) Participation requirements for long-term recipients. If not working full time, long-term welfare recipients had to participate in services designed to move them quickly into the workforce., and; (3) Simplification of rules and procedures. MFIP combined AFDC, Food Stamps, and the state-run Family General Assistance (FGA) program into a single program with one set of rules and procedures and one monthly payment.

    A central concern surrounding the recent wave of welfare reforms is how children will fare if their parents are subject to such policies as work mandates, time limits, and enhanced earnings disregards. Although research in child development suggests that children are affected by changes in their parents’ employment, income, and other aspects of the family environment, the net effects of these types of programs are not well understood. The findings in this report present one of the first looks at the effects of an innovative welfare reform policy on children. It also provides an unusual opportunity to more broadly assess how changes in income and employment can affect children’s outcomes. MFIP began operating in April 1994 in three urban and four rural Minnesota counties, and the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC), under contract with the Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS), has been tracking its implementation and effects. Between April 1994 and March 1996, over 14,000 families were assigned at random, using a lottery-type process, to either the MFIP or the AFDC system. This study, which focuses on family and child well-being, follows a sample of families in the urban counties of the MFIP evaluation who had a child age 2 to 9 at the time of random assignment. MFIP’s effects on families and children are assessed by comparing the outcomes for the experimental group (MFIP) and the control group (AFDC) three years after they entered the evaluation. Reforming Welfare and Rewarding Work: Final Report on the Minnesota Family Investment Program, Effects on Adults, Volume 1 of the final report on MFIP, discusses adults in the study and focuses on MFIP’s effects on such economic outcomes as employment, earnings, welfare receipt, and income for the full evaluation sample. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Miller, Cynthia; Knox, Virginia; Gennetian, Lisa A.; Dodoo, Martey; Hunter, Jo Anna; Redcross, Cindy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    In 1994, the state of Minnesota began a major welfare reform initiative aimed at encouraging work, reducing dependence on public assistance, and reducing poverty. The Minnesota Family Investment Program (MFIP) differed from the AFDC system in three key ways:
    
    1. Financial incentives to work. Parents could keep more of their benefits when they worked, and child care payments were paid directly to providers.
    
    2. Participation requirements for long-term recipients. If not working full time, long-term recipients had to participate in services designed to move them quickly into the workforce.
    
    3. Simplification of rules and procedures. Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), Food Stamps, and Family General Assistance (FGA) were combined into a single program with one set of rules and procedures and one monthly payment.
    
    MFIP began operating in April 1994 in three urban and four rural Minnesota counties, and the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (...

    In 1994, the state of Minnesota began a major welfare reform initiative aimed at encouraging work, reducing dependence on public assistance, and reducing poverty. The Minnesota Family Investment Program (MFIP) differed from the AFDC system in three key ways:
    
    1. Financial incentives to work. Parents could keep more of their benefits when they worked, and child care payments were paid directly to providers.
    
    2. Participation requirements for long-term recipients. If not working full time, long-term recipients had to participate in services designed to move them quickly into the workforce.
    
    3. Simplification of rules and procedures. Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), Food Stamps, and Family General Assistance (FGA) were combined into a single program with one set of rules and procedures and one monthly payment.
    
    MFIP began operating in April 1994 in three urban and four rural Minnesota counties, and the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC), under contract with the Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS), has been tracking the program’s implementation and effects. Between April 1994 and March 1996, over 14,000 families were assigned at random, using a lottery-type process, to either the MFIP or the AFDC system. MFIP’s effects are assessed by following the two groups for up to three years after they entered the evaluation and comparing their employment, earnings, welfare receipt, income, and other measures of well-being. A companion volume of this final report on MFIP presents the program’s effects on additional aspects of families’ wellbeing and its effects on children.1 (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Miller, Cynthia; Knox, Virginia; Auspos, Patricia; Hunter-Manns, Jo Anna; Orenstein, Alan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1997

    This report is the second in an evaluation of MFIP that the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC) is conducting under contract with Minnesota’s Department of Human Services (DHS) and with support from the Ford Foundation, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the McKnight Foundation, and the Northwest Area Foundation. The report examines the implementation of MFIP and its effects on welfare recipients’ employment, earnings, welfare receipt, and total income during their first 18 months in the study. (author abstract)

    This report is the second in an evaluation of MFIP that the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC) is conducting under contract with Minnesota’s Department of Human Services (DHS) and with support from the Ford Foundation, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the McKnight Foundation, and the Northwest Area Foundation. The report examines the implementation of MFIP and its effects on welfare recipients’ employment, earnings, welfare receipt, and total income during their first 18 months in the study. (author abstract)

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