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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    OPRE’s research in the area of welfare and family self-sufficiency is designed to expand knowledge about effective programs to promote employment, self-sufficiency, and economic well-being among low-income families. Research focuses on five major areas: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Employment and the Labor Market, Education and Training, Behavioral Science, and Cross-Cutting and Other Safety Net Research. Within these areas, OPRE funds experimental impact evaluations, implementation evaluations, and descriptive research projects aimed at informing the design and implementation of programs. OPRE also invests in activities to disseminate rigorous research on welfare and family self-sufficiency topics. This Portfolio of Research in Welfare and Family Self-Sufficiency describes major welfare and family self-sufficiency research projects sponsored by OPRE in Fiscal Year 2018. (Author abstract) 

     

    OPRE’s research in the area of welfare and family self-sufficiency is designed to expand knowledge about effective programs to promote employment, self-sufficiency, and economic well-being among low-income families. Research focuses on five major areas: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Employment and the Labor Market, Education and Training, Behavioral Science, and Cross-Cutting and Other Safety Net Research. Within these areas, OPRE funds experimental impact evaluations, implementation evaluations, and descriptive research projects aimed at informing the design and implementation of programs. OPRE also invests in activities to disseminate rigorous research on welfare and family self-sufficiency topics. This Portfolio of Research in Welfare and Family Self-Sufficiency describes major welfare and family self-sufficiency research projects sponsored by OPRE in Fiscal Year 2018. (Author abstract) 

     

  • Individual Author: Kauff, Jacqueline F.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    This brief was developed under the Goal-Oriented Adult Learning in Self-Sufficiency (GOALS) project on behalf of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE). Under this project, Mathematica Policy Research explored how emerging insights from psychology, neuroscience, behavioral science, and goal achievement can inform workforce development programs for lowincome adults. Several project activities contributed to the development of this brief, including

    (1) a literature synthesis that identified self-regulation skills that may be most relevant for attaining employment-related goals and the environmental influences that can support or inhibit optimal use of these skills (Cavadel et al. 2017),

    (2) telephone calls and exploratory site visits to document how programs for low-income populations are trying to improve and support use of self-regulation skills and goal attainment (Anderson et al. 2018),

    (3) the development of a conceptual framework for understanding the relationship between self-regulation, goal...

    This brief was developed under the Goal-Oriented Adult Learning in Self-Sufficiency (GOALS) project on behalf of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE). Under this project, Mathematica Policy Research explored how emerging insights from psychology, neuroscience, behavioral science, and goal achievement can inform workforce development programs for lowincome adults. Several project activities contributed to the development of this brief, including

    (1) a literature synthesis that identified self-regulation skills that may be most relevant for attaining employment-related goals and the environmental influences that can support or inhibit optimal use of these skills (Cavadel et al. 2017),

    (2) telephone calls and exploratory site visits to document how programs for low-income populations are trying to improve and support use of self-regulation skills and goal attainment (Anderson et al. 2018),

    (3) the development of a conceptual framework for understanding the relationship between self-regulation, goal attainment, and employment outcomes (Anderson et al. 2017),

    (4) evidence-informed quality improvement activities in TANF programs implementing new interventions focused on self-regulation and goal attainment (Derr et al. 2018), and

    (5) telephone interviews with employers that have engaged in public-private partnerships for workforce development. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Martinson, Karin; Harvill, Eleanor; Litwok, Daniel; Schwartz, Deena; De La Rosa, Siobhan Mills; Saunders, Correne; Bell, Stephen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    This report describes the implementation and impact study findings from an evaluation of the relative effectiveness of two approaches to providing job search assistance (JSA) to cash assistance applicants in New York City. From 2015 to 2016, the New York City Department of Social Services/Human Resources Administration administered two JSA programs for “job ready” cash assistance applicants: Back to Work (known as B2W, the pre-existing program) and Independent Job Search (IJS, a new program). The study examined the effects of these programs on cash assistance applicants, including both families with children and single, childless adults, who were determined to be able to work and who might need less job search assistance than other applicants.

    Using a rigorous research design, the study did not find a difference in employment rates or earnings during the six month follow-up period. However, compared to the IJS program, the B2W program increased the rate at which cash assistance applications were denied for not meeting application requirements and decreased the receipt of...

    This report describes the implementation and impact study findings from an evaluation of the relative effectiveness of two approaches to providing job search assistance (JSA) to cash assistance applicants in New York City. From 2015 to 2016, the New York City Department of Social Services/Human Resources Administration administered two JSA programs for “job ready” cash assistance applicants: Back to Work (known as B2W, the pre-existing program) and Independent Job Search (IJS, a new program). The study examined the effects of these programs on cash assistance applicants, including both families with children and single, childless adults, who were determined to be able to work and who might need less job search assistance than other applicants.

    Using a rigorous research design, the study did not find a difference in employment rates or earnings during the six month follow-up period. However, compared to the IJS program, the B2W program increased the rate at which cash assistance applications were denied for not meeting application requirements and decreased the receipt of cash assistance and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. While participation in job search assistance services was high for both groups, compared to IJS, those assigned to the B2W program were more likely to participate in group and one-on-one activities and to attend these activities for a greater number of hours. (Edited author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Ahonen, Pirkko; Geary, Erin; Keene, Kirsten
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2019

    A well-articulated theory of change and logic model are important tools in service delivery. These tools support programs in understanding and improving how a program functions. They provide a foundation for meaningful planning and monitoring of activities. A theory of change and logic model rely on and help support the use of data within an organization. As programs are beginning to articulate a theory of change, data can help service providers understand the needs of individuals with whom they work, their target population. Data can also help inform realistic goals for program progress. Once a theory of change and logic model are developed, data can help providers understand if activities are occurring (outputs) and whether the desired change is occurring (outcomes). Ultimately, a theory of change and logic model supports “data-driven decision-making.”

    This tool provides an overview of key concepts and strategies for creating a theory of change as well as a logic model. It also includes a discussion of strategies for ensuring that programs’ outputs and outcomes, two key...

    A well-articulated theory of change and logic model are important tools in service delivery. These tools support programs in understanding and improving how a program functions. They provide a foundation for meaningful planning and monitoring of activities. A theory of change and logic model rely on and help support the use of data within an organization. As programs are beginning to articulate a theory of change, data can help service providers understand the needs of individuals with whom they work, their target population. Data can also help inform realistic goals for program progress. Once a theory of change and logic model are developed, data can help providers understand if activities are occurring (outputs) and whether the desired change is occurring (outcomes). Ultimately, a theory of change and logic model supports “data-driven decision-making.”

    This tool provides an overview of key concepts and strategies for creating a theory of change as well as a logic model. It also includes a discussion of strategies for ensuring that programs’ outputs and outcomes, two key components of a logic model, are measurable. The tool concludes with a discussion on how and why to revisit a logic model so that it remains a relevant resource throughout the life of a program. Examples, worksheets, and a list of relevant available resources are also provided for programs seeking to incorporate the use of a well-articulated theory of change and logic model into their practice. (Edited author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Tran, Victoria; Dwyer, Kelly; Minton, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    If a single mother earns $25,000 per year, can she receive a subsidy to help pay for child care? What if she decides to attend a training program? If she does qualify for a subsidy, how much will she have to pay out of pocket? The answers to these questions depend on a family’s exact circumstances, including the ages of the children, the number of people in the family, income, and where they live. Child care subsidies are provided through a federal block grant program called the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). CCDF provides funding to the States, Territories, and Tribes. They use the money to administer child care subsidy programs for low-income families. This brief provides a graphical overview of some of the CCDF policy differences across States/Territories. It includes information about eligibility requirements, family application and terms of authorization, family payments, and policies for providers. (Excerpt from author introduction)

    If a single mother earns $25,000 per year, can she receive a subsidy to help pay for child care? What if she decides to attend a training program? If she does qualify for a subsidy, how much will she have to pay out of pocket? The answers to these questions depend on a family’s exact circumstances, including the ages of the children, the number of people in the family, income, and where they live. Child care subsidies are provided through a federal block grant program called the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). CCDF provides funding to the States, Territories, and Tribes. They use the money to administer child care subsidy programs for low-income families. This brief provides a graphical overview of some of the CCDF policy differences across States/Territories. It includes information about eligibility requirements, family application and terms of authorization, family payments, and policies for providers. (Excerpt from author introduction)

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