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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Currie, Janet; Walker, Reed
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Reducing traffic congestion with open-road tolling limits pollution and contributes to better infant health—and saves $440 million in health care costs. Among families living within 2 kilometers of expressway toll booths, premature births fell by between 6.7 percent and 9.2 percent after the installation of E-ZPass tolling systems. The incidence of low birth weight fell by between 8.5 percent and 11.3 percent. Where a child lives during his or her formative years can affect many things: the quality of education, the amount of exercise, the availability of a healthy diet, and even cognitive development. But what about the nearby environment? Can living along a busy highway, for example, increase the risk for asthma or other health issues from car pollution? As this brief shows, it can. Based on the paper “Traffic Congestion and Infant Health: Evidence from E-ZPass,” the findings show that installing an EZPass toll booth, which lowers traffic congestion and pollution, improves infant health. (Author introduction). 

    Reducing traffic congestion with open-road tolling limits pollution and contributes to better infant health—and saves $440 million in health care costs. Among families living within 2 kilometers of expressway toll booths, premature births fell by between 6.7 percent and 9.2 percent after the installation of E-ZPass tolling systems. The incidence of low birth weight fell by between 8.5 percent and 11.3 percent. Where a child lives during his or her formative years can affect many things: the quality of education, the amount of exercise, the availability of a healthy diet, and even cognitive development. But what about the nearby environment? Can living along a busy highway, for example, increase the risk for asthma or other health issues from car pollution? As this brief shows, it can. Based on the paper “Traffic Congestion and Infant Health: Evidence from E-ZPass,” the findings show that installing an EZPass toll booth, which lowers traffic congestion and pollution, improves infant health. (Author introduction). 

  • Individual Author: Deka, Devajyoti; DiPetrillo, Stephanie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The primary objective of this research was to assess the “Last Mile” shuttles in New Jersey. “Last Mile” shuttles are the shuttles that provide passengers access from transit nodes such as rail stations to their destinations. In New Jersey, the term “Last Mile” shuttle is primarily used to describe shuttles that provide job access to workers from rail stations to work sites. Most, but not all, such shuttles in New Jersey are funded by the federal Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program. Transportation management associations and counties are the primary providers of the services.

    This research includes analysis of both primary and secondary data. At the outset of the research, 34 “Last Mile” Shuttle routes were identified for detailed analysis. All but one of these routes were mapped using Geographic Information System, and shuttle corridors were identified using ½ mile buffers around the routes. Secondary data on land uses, jobs, socioeconomic characteristics, housing characteristics, and commuting characteristics were used to distinguish the “Last Mile” corridors...

    The primary objective of this research was to assess the “Last Mile” shuttles in New Jersey. “Last Mile” shuttles are the shuttles that provide passengers access from transit nodes such as rail stations to their destinations. In New Jersey, the term “Last Mile” shuttle is primarily used to describe shuttles that provide job access to workers from rail stations to work sites. Most, but not all, such shuttles in New Jersey are funded by the federal Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program. Transportation management associations and counties are the primary providers of the services.

    This research includes analysis of both primary and secondary data. At the outset of the research, 34 “Last Mile” Shuttle routes were identified for detailed analysis. All but one of these routes were mapped using Geographic Information System, and shuttle corridors were identified using ½ mile buffers around the routes. Secondary data on land uses, jobs, socioeconomic characteristics, housing characteristics, and commuting characteristics were used to distinguish the “Last Mile” corridors from “First Mile” shuttle corridors, control corridors, and areas not served by shuttles. The comparisons showed that the “Last Mile” shuttle corridors are substantially richer than other areas in terms of jobs, especially in “blue collar” jobs, including manufacturing and warehousing. Regarding socioeconomic, housing, and commuting characteristics, the “Last Mile” shuttle corridors are similar to typical middle-class suburban areas with low population density and a high dependence on automobile for commuting.

    In addition to the analysis of secondary data for examining the characteristics of the shuttle corridors, an onboard survey was conducted on 18 shuttle routes, collecting data from 311 shuttle users. A vast majority of the respondents used shuttles for commuting purposes. The shuttle users were found to be of relatively young age, belonging to low-income and minority households. More than half of the shuttle users belonged to households without vehicles and 38% belonged to households with less than $25,000 household income. The characteristics of the passengers and the locations served by the shuttles clearly indicate that the shuttles are primarily serving population groups that are supposed to be served by JARC-funded projects. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lubin, Andrea; Deka, Devajyoti
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    Transportation barriers are often cited as the primary reason for the discrepancy in employment rate between persons with disabilities and others. Yet little information is available about the transportation barriers and needs of persons with disabilities who are searching for employment. The primary objective of this descriptive paper is to share valuable information from a unique survey of persons with disabilities who are actively searching for employment in New Jersey. The paper examines the role of public transportation in providing job access to persons with disabilities. It provides information and insights on the availability, usage, needs, barriers, and perceptions of the survey respondents about different public transit modes, and discusses the implications for agencies that provide public and human services transportation. The research shows that despite frequent utilization of public transportation by job-seeking persons with disabilities, many are dissatisfied with public transportation. While satisfaction seems to be high regarding ADA-compliant vehicle equipment,...

    Transportation barriers are often cited as the primary reason for the discrepancy in employment rate between persons with disabilities and others. Yet little information is available about the transportation barriers and needs of persons with disabilities who are searching for employment. The primary objective of this descriptive paper is to share valuable information from a unique survey of persons with disabilities who are actively searching for employment in New Jersey. The paper examines the role of public transportation in providing job access to persons with disabilities. It provides information and insights on the availability, usage, needs, barriers, and perceptions of the survey respondents about different public transit modes, and discusses the implications for agencies that provide public and human services transportation. The research shows that despite frequent utilization of public transportation by job-seeking persons with disabilities, many are dissatisfied with public transportation. While satisfaction seems to be high regarding ADA-compliant vehicle equipment, many are dissatisfied with the level of transit service and environmental barriers between homes and transit stations/stops. It can be inferred from the results that a multitude of strategies will be needed to address the travel needs and barriers of job-seeking persons with disabilities in the state. In addition to assisting human services transportation planning and providing insights to vocational rehabilitation counselors, the observations in the study will be used to lay down the framework for more rigorous research on transportation needs and barriers of persons with disabilities. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hercik, Jeanette M.; Techico, Christina; Abner, Kristin; Davis, Diana
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    The New Jersey Department of Human Services, Division of Family Development (NJDFD) wanted to explore the prevalence, degree and location of transportation barriers among their Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) participants. This report is intended to summarize the specific needs of the TANF population in New Jersey from the view of the caseworkers and participants themselves based on the surveys and focus groups. It is not the intention of the Administration for Children and Families or the researchers to make policy or programmatic recommendations to the State of New Jersey. Through the design, development, and administration of customized, tested surveys for participants and staff, as well as the use of specialized focus groups with participants, New Jersey learned how and why barriers to employment and self-sufficiency were exacerbated by a lack of reliable and affordable transportation. Through an environmental scan of other State surveys from around the country, the Office of Family Assistance, New Jersey Division of Family Development, and ICF International...

    The New Jersey Department of Human Services, Division of Family Development (NJDFD) wanted to explore the prevalence, degree and location of transportation barriers among their Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) participants. This report is intended to summarize the specific needs of the TANF population in New Jersey from the view of the caseworkers and participants themselves based on the surveys and focus groups. It is not the intention of the Administration for Children and Families or the researchers to make policy or programmatic recommendations to the State of New Jersey. Through the design, development, and administration of customized, tested surveys for participants and staff, as well as the use of specialized focus groups with participants, New Jersey learned how and why barriers to employment and self-sufficiency were exacerbated by a lack of reliable and affordable transportation. Through an environmental scan of other State surveys from around the country, the Office of Family Assistance, New Jersey Division of Family Development, and ICF International jointly developed two surveys to be administered to TANF participants and staff, as well as a qualitative focus group protocol to ascertain in-depth information on how transportation functions as a barrier for New Jersey’s families. (Author abstract)