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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Nelson, Arthur C.; Miller, Matt; Eskic, Dejan; Ganning, Joanna P.; Liu, Jenny H.; Ewing, Reid
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Literature suggests that rail transit improvements should be associated with more jobs and perhaps increasing share of jobs in a metropolitan area. Literature and some research also suggest that such improvements should increase the number of lower-wage jobs accessible to transit. In this paper, we assess both in the context of all 11 light rail transit systems built in metropolitan areas of fewer than eight million residents in the nation since 1981. Using census block-level job data over the period 2002 to 2011, we evaluate change in jobs and change in metropolitan area job share for all jobs, and lower- and upper-wage jobs for selected light rail transit (LRT) corridors and comparable corridors in each of these 11 metropolitan areas. Overall, we find little difference between the LRT and control corridors in both attracting new jobs and new lower-wage jobs, or in changing relative share of jobs compared to their metropolitan areas, though systems built since 2004 appear to have fared slightly better in both respects. We view these results as generally supportive of LRT...

    Literature suggests that rail transit improvements should be associated with more jobs and perhaps increasing share of jobs in a metropolitan area. Literature and some research also suggest that such improvements should increase the number of lower-wage jobs accessible to transit. In this paper, we assess both in the context of all 11 light rail transit systems built in metropolitan areas of fewer than eight million residents in the nation since 1981. Using census block-level job data over the period 2002 to 2011, we evaluate change in jobs and change in metropolitan area job share for all jobs, and lower- and upper-wage jobs for selected light rail transit (LRT) corridors and comparable corridors in each of these 11 metropolitan areas. Overall, we find little difference between the LRT and control corridors in both attracting new jobs and new lower-wage jobs, or in changing relative share of jobs compared to their metropolitan areas, though systems built since 2004 appear to have fared slightly better in both respects. We view these results as generally supportive of LRT employment-related objectives. Planning and policy implications are offered. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hayden, Carolyn D.; Mauldin, Bronwyn
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    Lack of transportation is a critical barrier preventing many low-income people from finding and keeping a job. Historically governments, nonprofits and businesses have assumed that welfare recipients and low-wage workers who do not own cars will use public transit to meet their mobility needs. However, while public transportation may get many people to work, it does not work for everyone. Too often, low-income people find themselves unable to find or get to their jobs, take their children to child care, or accomplish all the other daily tasks many others take for granted.

    Among the most innovative new approaches to solving transportation barriers to work for low-income people are car ownership programs. A growing number of nonprofit organizations and government agencies across the country are creating programs to help low-income people acquire the cars they need to get to work. This report offers an in-depth study of seven of the most promising programs.

    This report presents detailed information about the seven programs studied. Among findings are the following:...

    Lack of transportation is a critical barrier preventing many low-income people from finding and keeping a job. Historically governments, nonprofits and businesses have assumed that welfare recipients and low-wage workers who do not own cars will use public transit to meet their mobility needs. However, while public transportation may get many people to work, it does not work for everyone. Too often, low-income people find themselves unable to find or get to their jobs, take their children to child care, or accomplish all the other daily tasks many others take for granted.

    Among the most innovative new approaches to solving transportation barriers to work for low-income people are car ownership programs. A growing number of nonprofit organizations and government agencies across the country are creating programs to help low-income people acquire the cars they need to get to work. This report offers an in-depth study of seven of the most promising programs.

    This report presents detailed information about the seven programs studied. Among findings are the following:

    • Car programs make available to clients used cars with a retail value ranging from $2,000 to $5,000;
    • Clients pay between $0 and $5,000 for these cars, which is usually structured through a monthly loan or lease payment;
    • TANF clients (and thus single mothers) make up the largest block of program clients, but most of these car programs serve other low- income populations as well;
    • Liability coverage for car programs is relatively easy to acquire, but securing auto insurance coverage for clients can be a significant challenge; and
    • Early results show that car ownership leads to higher wages and decreased dependence on government for clients of these programs.

    As an outcome of this study, the authors offer recommendations for best practices in car ownership programs, opportunities for policy changes that could improve mobility and job access for low-income workers and job seekers, suggestions for the role the private sector could play to support car ownership programs, and ideas for next steps to improve practice and policies. (author introduction)