Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Farrell, Mary; Martinson, Karin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report documents the implementation and early impacts of the Bridge to Employment in the Healthcare Industry program, designed by the San Diego Workforce Partnership and operated by three community-based organizations in San Diego County, California. Bridge to Employment is one promising effort to help low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete occupational training that can lead to increased employment and higher earnings. It is one of nine career pathways programs being evaluated under the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) study sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families. The Bridge to Employment program consisted of five components: (1) Assessments to determine eligibility for training programs; (2) Navigation and case management services to help students choose their training and address barriers to participation; (3) Individual training account (ITA) vouchers to cover the cost of training; (4) Supportive services for transportation, child care, and other services; and (5) Employment services to help participants find employment...

    This report documents the implementation and early impacts of the Bridge to Employment in the Healthcare Industry program, designed by the San Diego Workforce Partnership and operated by three community-based organizations in San Diego County, California. Bridge to Employment is one promising effort to help low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete occupational training that can lead to increased employment and higher earnings. It is one of nine career pathways programs being evaluated under the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) study sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families. The Bridge to Employment program consisted of five components: (1) Assessments to determine eligibility for training programs; (2) Navigation and case management services to help students choose their training and address barriers to participation; (3) Individual training account (ITA) vouchers to cover the cost of training; (4) Supportive services for transportation, child care, and other services; and (5) Employment services to help participants find employment after training. Using a rigorous research design, the study found that Bridge to Employment increased the credentials its participants received and increased employment in a healthcare occupation within the 18-month follow-up period. Future reports will examine whether these effects translate into economic gains in the workplace in the longer term. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Blumenberg, Evelyn; Klein, Nicholas; Weinstein Agrawal, Asha; Abner, Kristin
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2017

    On June 28th, 2017 at 2:00pm, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free Webinar entitled Transportation Access and Its Importance to Economic Mobility and Family Self-Sufficiency. This moderated Webinar provided an in-depth look at the research on how transportation barriers hinder self-sufficiency for low-income workers and explored practice- and policy-based approaches for alleviating transportation barriers. During this webinar, presenters will discussed the state of the research on transportation as a barrier to self-sufficiency and the relationship between transportation and economic/employment outcomes, as well as provided a practice and policy perspective to include recommendations and findings relevant to the self-sufficiency field. Dr. Evelyn Blumenberg, Dr. Nicholas Klein, and Dr. Asha Weinstein Agrawal served as speakers and Dr. Kristin Abner moderated the discussion.

    This is the PowerPoint presentation from the Webinar. Listen to the recording from the Webinar...

    On June 28th, 2017 at 2:00pm, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free Webinar entitled Transportation Access and Its Importance to Economic Mobility and Family Self-Sufficiency. This moderated Webinar provided an in-depth look at the research on how transportation barriers hinder self-sufficiency for low-income workers and explored practice- and policy-based approaches for alleviating transportation barriers. During this webinar, presenters will discussed the state of the research on transportation as a barrier to self-sufficiency and the relationship between transportation and economic/employment outcomes, as well as provided a practice and policy perspective to include recommendations and findings relevant to the self-sufficiency field. Dr. Evelyn Blumenberg, Dr. Nicholas Klein, and Dr. Asha Weinstein Agrawal served as speakers and Dr. Kristin Abner moderated the discussion.

    This is the PowerPoint presentation from the Webinar. Listen to the recording from the Webinar here. The Webinar transcript can be found here. A record of the question and answer session from the Webinar can be found here.

  • Individual Author: Blumenberg, Evelyn; Klein, Nicholas; Weinstein Agrawal, Asha; Abner, Kristin
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2017

    On June 28th, 2017 at 2:00pm, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free Webinar entitled Transportation Access and Its Importance to Economic Mobility and Family Self-Sufficiency. This moderated Webinar provided an in-depth look at the research on how transportation barriers hinder self-sufficiency for low-income workers and explored practice- and policy-based approaches for alleviating transportation barriers. During this webinar, presenters will discussed the state of the research on transportation as a barrier to self-sufficiency and the relationship between transportation and economic/employment outcomes, as well as provided a practice and policy perspective to include recommendations and findings relevant to the self-sufficiency field. Dr. Evelyn Blumenberg, Dr. Nicholas Klein, and Dr. Asha Weinstein Agrawal served as speakers and Dr. Kristin Abner moderated the discussion.

    This is the a record of the question and answer session from the Webinar. Listen to the recording from the Webinar...

    On June 28th, 2017 at 2:00pm, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free Webinar entitled Transportation Access and Its Importance to Economic Mobility and Family Self-Sufficiency. This moderated Webinar provided an in-depth look at the research on how transportation barriers hinder self-sufficiency for low-income workers and explored practice- and policy-based approaches for alleviating transportation barriers. During this webinar, presenters will discussed the state of the research on transportation as a barrier to self-sufficiency and the relationship between transportation and economic/employment outcomes, as well as provided a practice and policy perspective to include recommendations and findings relevant to the self-sufficiency field. Dr. Evelyn Blumenberg, Dr. Nicholas Klein, and Dr. Asha Weinstein Agrawal served as speakers and Dr. Kristin Abner moderated the discussion.

    This is the a record of the question and answer session from the Webinar. Listen to the recording from the Webinar here. The Webinar transcript can be found here. The powerpoint presentation from the Webinar can be found here.

  • Individual Author: Blumenberg, Evelyn; Klein, Nicholas; Weinstein Agrawal, Asha; Abner, Kristin
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2017

    On June 28th, 2017 at 2:00pm, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free Webinar entitled Transportation Access and Its Importance to Economic Mobility and Family Self-Sufficiency. This moderated Webinar provided an in-depth look at the research on how transportation barriers hinder self-sufficiency for low-income workers and explored practice- and policy-based approaches for alleviating transportation barriers. During this webinar, presenters will discussed the state of the research on transportation as a barrier to self-sufficiency and the relationship between transportation and economic/employment outcomes, as well as provided a practice and policy perspective to include recommendations and findings relevant to the self-sufficiency field. Dr. Evelyn Blumenberg, Dr. Nicholas Klein, and Dr. Asha Weinstein Agrawal served as speakers and Dr. Kristin Abner moderated the discussion.

    This is the transcript from the Webinar. Listen to the recording from the Webinar...

    On June 28th, 2017 at 2:00pm, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free Webinar entitled Transportation Access and Its Importance to Economic Mobility and Family Self-Sufficiency. This moderated Webinar provided an in-depth look at the research on how transportation barriers hinder self-sufficiency for low-income workers and explored practice- and policy-based approaches for alleviating transportation barriers. During this webinar, presenters will discussed the state of the research on transportation as a barrier to self-sufficiency and the relationship between transportation and economic/employment outcomes, as well as provided a practice and policy perspective to include recommendations and findings relevant to the self-sufficiency field. Dr. Evelyn Blumenberg, Dr. Nicholas Klein, and Dr. Asha Weinstein Agrawal served as speakers and Dr. Kristin Abner moderated the discussion.

    This is the transcript from the Webinar. Listen to the recording from the Webinar here. The powerpoint presentation from the webinar can be found here. A record of the question and answer session from the Webinar can be found here.

  • Individual Author: Burwick, Andrew; Jethwani, Vinita; Meckstroth, Alicia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2004

    Rural low-income families trying to find jobs, maintain employment, and secure longer-term well-being face distinct challenges. In rural labor markets, jobs tend to be scarcer than in urban ones, and the jobs that are available more often involve minimum-wage or part-time work. Education and training opportunities and such support services as health and mental health care also are more likely to be difficult to obtain. Moreover, lack of public transportation common in rural areas can make existing jobs and services difficult for a dispersed population to access.
    
    This report chronicles the implementation experiences of the three demonstration programs participating in the Rural Welfare-to-Work (RWtW) Strategies Demonstration Evaluation. Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (MPR) and its subcontractors, Decision Information Resources and the Rural Policy Research Institute, are conducting the evaluation with funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families. Although it does not present findings...

    Rural low-income families trying to find jobs, maintain employment, and secure longer-term well-being face distinct challenges. In rural labor markets, jobs tend to be scarcer than in urban ones, and the jobs that are available more often involve minimum-wage or part-time work. Education and training opportunities and such support services as health and mental health care also are more likely to be difficult to obtain. Moreover, lack of public transportation common in rural areas can make existing jobs and services difficult for a dispersed population to access.
    
    This report chronicles the implementation experiences of the three demonstration programs participating in the Rural Welfare-to-Work (RWtW) Strategies Demonstration Evaluation. Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (MPR) and its subcontractors, Decision Information Resources and the Rural Policy Research Institute, are conducting the evaluation with funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families. Although it does not present findings on the impact of the demonstration programs - impact and cost-benefit research is still in progress - the report does share an early assessment of how the programs operate and the successes and challenges they have encountered so far. Researchers gathered information for the process and implementation study through in-depth site visits to each program (conducted between February 2002 and August 2003) and management information systems (MIS). (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1998 to 2017

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations