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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Loprest, Pamela J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    This brief shows that in the early period after welfare reform, many former recipients are working and working full-time. They are generally finding relatively low-wage entry-level jobs with few benefits. Also, fewer welfare leavers are participating in Medicaid and food stamps than might be expected. When compared to the much larger group of working poor families with children who have not received welfare, former recipients look very similar. They work at about the same rate, at the same type of jobs, and at the same wage rates. Even though former recipients have similar earnings to their peers who never received cash assistance, they report more struggles making ends meet. A third to half faced serious struggles providing food for their families, and about one in five had problems paying for housing. The similarity of former recipients employment situations to other non-welfare poor families suggests that programs to support work need to focus broadly on both groups. But the continuing struggles of former recipients suggest they may continue to need help transitioning toward...

    This brief shows that in the early period after welfare reform, many former recipients are working and working full-time. They are generally finding relatively low-wage entry-level jobs with few benefits. Also, fewer welfare leavers are participating in Medicaid and food stamps than might be expected. When compared to the much larger group of working poor families with children who have not received welfare, former recipients look very similar. They work at about the same rate, at the same type of jobs, and at the same wage rates. Even though former recipients have similar earnings to their peers who never received cash assistance, they report more struggles making ends meet. A third to half faced serious struggles providing food for their families, and about one in five had problems paying for housing. The similarity of former recipients employment situations to other non-welfare poor families suggests that programs to support work need to focus broadly on both groups. But the continuing struggles of former recipients suggest they may continue to need help transitioning toward self-sufficiency. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fisher, Gordon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    During the first year or so after the 1995 issuance of the report of the National Research Council's Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance, there appeared to be relatively little government response to it. Since then, however, there has been a good deal of research and related activities to lay the groundwork for possible adoption of some form of the Panel's recommendations as a new official poverty measure for the U.S. A number of relevant papers resulting from this research are available on the Census Bureau's Experimental Poverty Measures Internet site. This research is summarized in the first part of this paper; a summary of the Panel's main recommendations forms the second part. (author abstract)

    During the first year or so after the 1995 issuance of the report of the National Research Council's Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance, there appeared to be relatively little government response to it. Since then, however, there has been a good deal of research and related activities to lay the groundwork for possible adoption of some form of the Panel's recommendations as a new official poverty measure for the U.S. A number of relevant papers resulting from this research are available on the Census Bureau's Experimental Poverty Measures Internet site. This research is summarized in the first part of this paper; a summary of the Panel's main recommendations forms the second part. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gallagher, L. Jerome
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    This report finds that General Assistance has contracted considerably over the past decade. During this period, states shrank their GA programs by restricting assistance to some groups, especially able-bodied adults without dependent children, and by holding benefits to pre-1989 levels. Many of the cutbacks to GA were enacted in the early part of the decade when states' budgets were tight as a result of the poor economy. As the fiscal situation of states improved, however, none have made substantial restorations. Although GA programs exist to provide income support to populations ineligible for federal cash assistance, the paper concludes that states have limited the capacity of their programs to provide such support. (author abstract)

    This report finds that General Assistance has contracted considerably over the past decade. During this period, states shrank their GA programs by restricting assistance to some groups, especially able-bodied adults without dependent children, and by holding benefits to pre-1989 levels. Many of the cutbacks to GA were enacted in the early part of the decade when states' budgets were tight as a result of the poor economy. As the fiscal situation of states improved, however, none have made substantial restorations. Although GA programs exist to provide income support to populations ineligible for federal cash assistance, the paper concludes that states have limited the capacity of their programs to provide such support. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Porter, Kathryn; Primus, Wendell
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    This report examines Census data on the reduction in child poverty government benefits between 1993 and 1998. Analysis indicates that due to the improving economy and increases in employment and earnings among low-income families, the number of children living in poverty has declined significantly since 1993. Between 1993 and 1995, the reduction in child poverty was substantial; after 1995, progress against child poverty continued, but at a much slower pace. Additionally, Census data show that the primary reason poor children became poorer between 1995 and 1998 is that the safety net became less effective in reducing the depth of child poverty. (author introduction)

    This report examines Census data on the reduction in child poverty government benefits between 1993 and 1998. Analysis indicates that due to the improving economy and increases in employment and earnings among low-income families, the number of children living in poverty has declined significantly since 1993. Between 1993 and 1995, the reduction in child poverty was substantial; after 1995, progress against child poverty continued, but at a much slower pace. Additionally, Census data show that the primary reason poor children became poorer between 1995 and 1998 is that the safety net became less effective in reducing the depth of child poverty. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Saylor, William G.; Gaes, Gerald G.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    The Post Release Employment Project (PREP) was designed to evaluate the effect of industrial work experience (UNICOR), and vocational, and apprenticeship training programs on prison adjustment and post-release outcomes. Post release outcomes were defined as employment and recidivism. Short term recidivism -- up to 1 year -- was based on either a revocation of a term of supervision or re-arrest. Long term recidivism -- up to 12 years -- was defined as a revocation or re-incarceration following a conviction for a new offense. Previous findings (Saylor and Gaes, 1997) demonstrated that these kinds of programs inhibit prison misconduct, increase the likelihood of post release employment, and reduce post prison re-arrest and recommitment rates.

    The purpose of this brief research note is to report further analyses of the PREP data which focuses on the differential effects of training programs on racial and ethnic groups. There has been some evidence that minorities may benefit more from industrial training than nonminorities. (author introduction)

    The Post Release Employment Project (PREP) was designed to evaluate the effect of industrial work experience (UNICOR), and vocational, and apprenticeship training programs on prison adjustment and post-release outcomes. Post release outcomes were defined as employment and recidivism. Short term recidivism -- up to 1 year -- was based on either a revocation of a term of supervision or re-arrest. Long term recidivism -- up to 12 years -- was defined as a revocation or re-incarceration following a conviction for a new offense. Previous findings (Saylor and Gaes, 1997) demonstrated that these kinds of programs inhibit prison misconduct, increase the likelihood of post release employment, and reduce post prison re-arrest and recommitment rates.

    The purpose of this brief research note is to report further analyses of the PREP data which focuses on the differential effects of training programs on racial and ethnic groups. There has been some evidence that minorities may benefit more from industrial training than nonminorities. (author introduction)

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