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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Zill, Nicholas; Resnick, Gary; McKey, Ruth Hubbell
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    The national Head Start Bureau has determined that the ultimate goal of the program is, “to enhance the social competence of children from low-income families.” Social competence has been defined by the Bureau as, “a child's everyday effectiveness in dealing with both the present environment and later responsibilities in school and life.” For the five-year-old child coming to the end of the preschool period, a key test of social competence is how well he or she functions and adjusts to the demands of kindergarten and elementary school, what is often called school readiness. One of the primary objectives of the Head Start program supporting the goal of social competence and school readiness is “to enhance children’s healthy growth and development.”

    The instruments used in the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) were designed to tap major components of social competence. Children’s cognitive development and early academic skills were measured through a direct child assessment administered to each of the sample children by specially trained assessors....

    The national Head Start Bureau has determined that the ultimate goal of the program is, “to enhance the social competence of children from low-income families.” Social competence has been defined by the Bureau as, “a child's everyday effectiveness in dealing with both the present environment and later responsibilities in school and life.” For the five-year-old child coming to the end of the preschool period, a key test of social competence is how well he or she functions and adjusts to the demands of kindergarten and elementary school, what is often called school readiness. One of the primary objectives of the Head Start program supporting the goal of social competence and school readiness is “to enhance children’s healthy growth and development.”

    The instruments used in the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) were designed to tap major components of social competence. Children’s cognitive development and early academic skills were measured through a direct child assessment administered to each of the sample children by specially trained assessors. Children’s developing social skills were assessed by means of standardized scales filled out by teachers and parents and through direct observation of the children’s social play, observations made during multi-day visits to Head Start centers. Children’s approaches to learning and problem behaviors were also captured through standardized teacher and parent reports, as well as through scales completed by the trained assessors after they had conducted their one-on-one testing sessions with the children. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 1999 is the third report in an annual series prepared by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. A collaborative effort by 18 Federal agencies, the report is required by President Clinton’s Executive Order No. 13045. As in past years, readers will find here an accessible compendium—drawn from the most recent, most reliable official statistics—to both the promises and the difficulties confronting our Nation’s young people.

    This report updates the information presented last year, maintaining comparability with previous volumes while incorporating several improvements: the racial/ethnic categories have been made more consistent across indicators; additional detail has been added to the population and family characteristic, Births to Unmarried Women; the Food Security indicator has been expanded to include a measure of the nutritional quality of children’s diets; and Children Who Have Difficulty Performing Everyday Activities has been included as a new special feature. This relatively simple...

    America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 1999 is the third report in an annual series prepared by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. A collaborative effort by 18 Federal agencies, the report is required by President Clinton’s Executive Order No. 13045. As in past years, readers will find here an accessible compendium—drawn from the most recent, most reliable official statistics—to both the promises and the difficulties confronting our Nation’s young people.

    This report updates the information presented last year, maintaining comparability with previous volumes while incorporating several improvements: the racial/ethnic categories have been made more consistent across indicators; additional detail has been added to the population and family characteristic, Births to Unmarried Women; the Food Security indicator has been expanded to include a measure of the nutritional quality of children’s diets; and Children Who Have Difficulty Performing Everyday Activities has been included as a new special feature. This relatively simple update in 1999 reflects a decision to concentrate the Forum’s resources on consideration of a more substantial revision in 2000. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Kisker, Ellen Eliason; Love, John M.; Raikes, Helen; Boller, Kimberly; Paulsell, Diane; Rosenberg, Linda; Coolahan, Kathleen; Berlin, Lisa
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    Early Head Start has blossomed from a fledgling program with 68 grantees in 1995 into today’s national initiative, with more than 500 grantees around the country, an increasing proportion of the Head Start budget (from 3 percent in 1995 to 10 percent in 2002), strong bipartisan support, and support from the administration.1 Seventeen of these programs are participating in national and local research and evaluation studies that are documenting the implementation process and assessing program impacts and outcomes. The Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF) envisions these research programs as leading the way by providing information that will promote improvements and inform further expansion of Early Head Start nationally. As part of the first group of Early Head Start programs funded, the 17 research sites are in the forefront in designing and implementing programs that meet the revised Head Start Program Performance Standards (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 1996). As participants in the Early Head Start National Research and Evaluation Project, they...

    Early Head Start has blossomed from a fledgling program with 68 grantees in 1995 into today’s national initiative, with more than 500 grantees around the country, an increasing proportion of the Head Start budget (from 3 percent in 1995 to 10 percent in 2002), strong bipartisan support, and support from the administration.1 Seventeen of these programs are participating in national and local research and evaluation studies that are documenting the implementation process and assessing program impacts and outcomes. The Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF) envisions these research programs as leading the way by providing information that will promote improvements and inform further expansion of Early Head Start nationally. As part of the first group of Early Head Start programs funded, the 17 research sites are in the forefront in designing and implementing programs that meet the revised Head Start Program Performance Standards (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 1996). As participants in the Early Head Start National Research and Evaluation Project, they are demonstrating what Early Head Start programs can accomplish. They are also sharing the lessons they have learned in creating Early Head Start programs and in developing high-quality services for infants and toddlers and their families. (author abstract)

    An executive summary of all three volumes is also available.

  • Individual Author: Kisker, Ellen Eliason; Love, John M.; Raikes, Helen; Boller, Kimberly; Paulsell, Diane; Rosenberg, Linda; Coolahan, Kathleen; Berlin, Lisa
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    Seventeen grantees are leading the way in developing Early Head Start programs. They are not only tackling the challenges of implementing comprehensive services for diverse families, they are also working with researchers to improve our knowledge about effective program strategies to promote healthy child development and family well-being in low-income families. As part of the first group of EHS programs funded, they are on the forefront in designing and implementing programs that meet the general Early Head Start program guidelines.1 As participants in the Early Head Start National Research and Evaluation Project, they are demonstrating what Early Head Start programs can accomplish and sharing their experiences and the lessons they have learned in creating Early Head Start programs and developing high-quality services for infants and toddlers and their families.

    This volume and its companion volumes are the first of two reports designed to share the experiences of the 17 Early Head Start research programs with others. The first report focuses on the programs early in...

    Seventeen grantees are leading the way in developing Early Head Start programs. They are not only tackling the challenges of implementing comprehensive services for diverse families, they are also working with researchers to improve our knowledge about effective program strategies to promote healthy child development and family well-being in low-income families. As part of the first group of EHS programs funded, they are on the forefront in designing and implementing programs that meet the general Early Head Start program guidelines.1 As participants in the Early Head Start National Research and Evaluation Project, they are demonstrating what Early Head Start programs can accomplish and sharing their experiences and the lessons they have learned in creating Early Head Start programs and developing high-quality services for infants and toddlers and their families.

    This volume and its companion volumes are the first of two reports designed to share the experiences of the 17 Early Head Start research programs with others. The first report focuses on the programs early in their implementation (fall 1997), approximately two years after they were funded and one year after they began serving families. Volume I examines the characteristics and experiences of the 17 research programs from a cross-site perspective, focusing on the similarities and differences among the programs in fall 1997. Volume III analyzes the levels of program implementation achieved by the programs across program areas in fall 1997. Following a brief description of Early Head Start and the national evaluation, this volume presents in-depth profiles of each of the research programs in fall 1997. (author abstract)

    An executive summary of all three volumes is also available.

  • Individual Author: Hendra, Richard; Michalopoulos, Charles
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    One of the first statewide welfare reform programs initiated under waivers of federal welfare rules that were granted before the passage of the 1996 federal welfare reform law, Vermont's Welfare Restructuring Project aimed to increase work and self-support among recipients of cash assistance. Under WRP, most single-parent recipients were required to work in wage-paying jobs once they had received welfare for 30 cumulative months (two-parent families with an able-bodied primary wage earner face a full-time work requirement after 15 months of benefits). The program also included a set of financial work incentives, consisting of supports for families who leave welfare for employment, as well as changes in welfare rules intended to encourage and reward work. Updating earlier estimates of the program's impact, an analysis of administrative records done for this report finds that employment rates increased substantially as the work-trigger time limit was reached and families relied more on earnings and less on cash assistance, but total household income was unaffected. (author abstract...

    One of the first statewide welfare reform programs initiated under waivers of federal welfare rules that were granted before the passage of the 1996 federal welfare reform law, Vermont's Welfare Restructuring Project aimed to increase work and self-support among recipients of cash assistance. Under WRP, most single-parent recipients were required to work in wage-paying jobs once they had received welfare for 30 cumulative months (two-parent families with an able-bodied primary wage earner face a full-time work requirement after 15 months of benefits). The program also included a set of financial work incentives, consisting of supports for families who leave welfare for employment, as well as changes in welfare rules intended to encourage and reward work. Updating earlier estimates of the program's impact, an analysis of administrative records done for this report finds that employment rates increased substantially as the work-trigger time limit was reached and families relied more on earnings and less on cash assistance, but total household income was unaffected. (author abstract)

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