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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Dickert-Conlin, Stacy; Houser, Scott
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    Concerns about the incentives for female headship for low-income families have focused on Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); however, the expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) has brought more low-income households into the tax system, subjecting them to additional marriage non-neutralities. Theoretical predictions about the correlations between the EITC and female headship are ambiguous. This paper is the first to provide empirical evidence that the EITC is correlated with female headship decisions. Using data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation, we find no significant correlations between AFDC and female headship. However, the ambiguous effect of the EITC on female headship is evident in our empirical analysis. After controlling for individual effects, we find that higher EITCs are associated with increased female headship for white women, but with decreased female headship for black women. For a sample of white women, we find that a $100 increase in the EITC would increase the probability of female headship by 0.1 percent. For a sample...

    Concerns about the incentives for female headship for low-income families have focused on Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); however, the expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) has brought more low-income households into the tax system, subjecting them to additional marriage non-neutralities. Theoretical predictions about the correlations between the EITC and female headship are ambiguous. This paper is the first to provide empirical evidence that the EITC is correlated with female headship decisions. Using data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation, we find no significant correlations between AFDC and female headship. However, the ambiguous effect of the EITC on female headship is evident in our empirical analysis. After controlling for individual effects, we find that higher EITCs are associated with increased female headship for white women, but with decreased female headship for black women. For a sample of white women, we find that a $100 increase in the EITC would increase the probability of female headship by 0.1 percent. For a sample of black women, we find that a $100 increase in the EITC would decrease the probability of female headship by 1.4 percent, although this result is not robust. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    This table describes the current and recently completed child care research conducted by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), and the Office of the Inspector General (OIG). (author abstract)

    This table describes the current and recently completed child care research conducted by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), and the Office of the Inspector General (OIG). (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Holcomb, Pamela A.; Flores, Kimura; Pernas, Marta; Herbig, Carla; Tumlin, Karen C.; Botsko, Christopher A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    This report focuses on the baseline conditions of cash assistance and social services in Florida, as the state embarked on the new welfare reforms associated with the federal Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA)—in particular, replacement of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) with Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). (author introduction)

    This report focuses on the baseline conditions of cash assistance and social services in Florida, as the state embarked on the new welfare reforms associated with the federal Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA)—in particular, replacement of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) with Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Keast, Robert
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    Welfare-to-work has come to the fore of the social policy debate in recent years. This especially has been the case since the enactment of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA). PRWORA significantly altered over 60 years of American welfare policy by creating a public assistance program with the aim of replacing public sector welfare checks with private sector paychecks. In order to reach this goal, time limits on receipt of assistance as well as stronger work requirements have become central in moving people from welfare and into work. (author abstract)

    Welfare-to-work has come to the fore of the social policy debate in recent years. This especially has been the case since the enactment of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA). PRWORA significantly altered over 60 years of American welfare policy by creating a public assistance program with the aim of replacing public sector welfare checks with private sector paychecks. In order to reach this goal, time limits on receipt of assistance as well as stronger work requirements have become central in moving people from welfare and into work. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Weaver, Hilary
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1999

    During the past decade much has been said about the need to include cultural issues as a factor in the helping process. The discussion in social work literature has moved from cultural sensitivity to cultural competence, the ability to integrate cultural knowledge and sensitivity with skills for a more effective and culturally appropriate helping process. This article reports the results of a study of culturally competent helping practices with Native Americans. Sixty-two Native American social workers and social work students completed a survey on knowledge, skills, and values necessary for culturally competent service provision to Native American clients. As both Native Americans and helping professionals, the survey respondents are in an ideal position to articulate how best to serve the Native American population. This article fills a gap in the literature by providing empirical information on culturally competent social work with Native Americans. (author abstract)

    During the past decade much has been said about the need to include cultural issues as a factor in the helping process. The discussion in social work literature has moved from cultural sensitivity to cultural competence, the ability to integrate cultural knowledge and sensitivity with skills for a more effective and culturally appropriate helping process. This article reports the results of a study of culturally competent helping practices with Native Americans. Sixty-two Native American social workers and social work students completed a survey on knowledge, skills, and values necessary for culturally competent service provision to Native American clients. As both Native Americans and helping professionals, the survey respondents are in an ideal position to articulate how best to serve the Native American population. This article fills a gap in the literature by providing empirical information on culturally competent social work with Native Americans. (author abstract)

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