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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Sard, Barbara; Daskal, Jennifer
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1998

    Funding for rental housing assistance has traditionally flowed directly from the Department of Housing and Urban Development to the 3,400 public housing authorities throughout the country. States and local governments have played only a minor role in the provision of federally funded housing assistance to poor families.

    The new housing vouchers that both the House and Senate appropriations bills would target on families making the transition from welfare to work would begin to change this. The program would establish new partnerships between housing agencies and state and local agencies working to promote and implement welfare reform and help states meet the goal of moving families from welfare to work. In conjunction with state and local welfare agencies and local entities administering the new federal welfare-to-work funds, public housing authorities (PHAs) would compete for the vouchers. PHAs, welfare agencies, and administrators of welfare-to-work grants would collaborate to design programs that meet their particular needs. For the first time, federally funded housing...

    Funding for rental housing assistance has traditionally flowed directly from the Department of Housing and Urban Development to the 3,400 public housing authorities throughout the country. States and local governments have played only a minor role in the provision of federally funded housing assistance to poor families.

    The new housing vouchers that both the House and Senate appropriations bills would target on families making the transition from welfare to work would begin to change this. The program would establish new partnerships between housing agencies and state and local agencies working to promote and implement welfare reform and help states meet the goal of moving families from welfare to work. In conjunction with state and local welfare agencies and local entities administering the new federal welfare-to-work funds, public housing authorities (PHAs) would compete for the vouchers. PHAs, welfare agencies, and administrators of welfare-to-work grants would collaborate to design programs that meet their particular needs. For the first time, federally funded housing resources would be provided specifically to complement and further the goals of state welfare reform programs. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Cohen, Marie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1998

    This publication, one of a series designed to help policymakers and TANF [Temporary Assistance for Needy Families] agency personnel, offers an overview of programs providing publicly funded paid jobs in the public or nonprofit sector to TANF recipients, as well as of work experience programs in which recipients receive welfare payment in return for working. The first section asks and answers some policy questions, including: What should be the purpose of work experience or publicly funded jobs?; What are the merits of publicly funded jobs as compared to unpaid work experience?; Which TANF recipients should be placed in work experience or publicly funded jobs?; What can be done to prevent displacement of current employees?; What adjustments should be made in areas where unemployment is high?; What should the wage and hour requirements be?; What can states and localities do when work experience or publicly funded jobs do not provide enough hours to meet federal participation requirements?; What additional services should be included?; Who should administer a work experience or...

    This publication, one of a series designed to help policymakers and TANF [Temporary Assistance for Needy Families] agency personnel, offers an overview of programs providing publicly funded paid jobs in the public or nonprofit sector to TANF recipients, as well as of work experience programs in which recipients receive welfare payment in return for working. The first section asks and answers some policy questions, including: What should be the purpose of work experience or publicly funded jobs?; What are the merits of publicly funded jobs as compared to unpaid work experience?; Which TANF recipients should be placed in work experience or publicly funded jobs?; What can be done to prevent displacement of current employees?; What adjustments should be made in areas where unemployment is high?; What should the wage and hour requirements be?; What can states and localities do when work experience or publicly funded jobs do not provide enough hours to meet federal participation requirements?; What additional services should be included?; Who should administer a work experience or publicly funded jobs program?; and What funds should be used for publicly funded jobs?. The second section summarizes research findings, and the third section focuses on innovative practices in unpaid work experience and community service programs and publicly funded jobs programs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kisker, Ellen Eliason; Rangarajan, Anu; Boller, Kimberly
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1998

    Anticipating the mandatory participation requirements of the 1988 Family Support Act, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), in 1986, launched the Teenage Parent Demonstration (TPD) to test the feasibility and effects of requiring teenage parents on welfare to participate in activities aimed at achieving economic self-sufficiency in order to receive maximum welfare benefits. Public welfare agencies in Illinois and New Jersey were awarded grants to design and implement the TPD programs. The Illinois program, Project Advance, operated in the south side of Chicago; the New Jersey program. Teen Progress, operated in Newark and Camden. The programs began serving young mothers in mid-1987 and continued through mid-1991. DHHS contracted with Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. to evaluate the demonstration programs. The first phase of the evaluation focused on documenting the implementation and costs of the programs, assessing the service needs and use of participants (including special studies of child care needs and use), and examining the short-term impacts of the...

    Anticipating the mandatory participation requirements of the 1988 Family Support Act, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), in 1986, launched the Teenage Parent Demonstration (TPD) to test the feasibility and effects of requiring teenage parents on welfare to participate in activities aimed at achieving economic self-sufficiency in order to receive maximum welfare benefits. Public welfare agencies in Illinois and New Jersey were awarded grants to design and implement the TPD programs. The Illinois program, Project Advance, operated in the south side of Chicago; the New Jersey program. Teen Progress, operated in Newark and Camden. The programs began serving young mothers in mid-1987 and continued through mid-1991. DHHS contracted with Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. to evaluate the demonstration programs. The first phase of the evaluation focused on documenting the implementation and costs of the programs, assessing the service needs and use of participants (including special studies of child care needs and use), and examining the short-term impacts of the programs on mothers' prospects for attaining economic self-sufficiency. The second phase of the evaluation focused on measuring the endurance of the short-term impacts of the programs on mothers' prospects and assessing program impacts on the well-being of each mother's first-born child during the first few years after the program requirements and special services ended.

    This report presents the findings from the second phase of the evaluation. The remaining sections of this chapter provide an overview of the demonstration rationale, the intervention design, the demonstration evaluation, and a summary of the key findings. The following chapters present the evaluation findings in detail. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Zaslow, Martha; Tout, Kathryn; Botsko, Christopher; Moore, Kristin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1998

    Adults are typically the focus of welfare policies and programs, even though children comprise a majority of public assistance recipients. In 1995, about two-thirds of those receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children each month were children. Moreover, key provisions in the most recent welfare legislation, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA), have implications for children. Based on research findings from welfare-to-work program evaluations and from basic research on child development, we conclude that welfare reform can affect children in diverse ways. These effects will vary depending on state and local policies, family characteristics and risk status, patterns of maternal employment, and children’s experiences in the home and in nonmaternal care settings. (author abstract)

    Adults are typically the focus of welfare policies and programs, even though children comprise a majority of public assistance recipients. In 1995, about two-thirds of those receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children each month were children. Moreover, key provisions in the most recent welfare legislation, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA), have implications for children. Based on research findings from welfare-to-work program evaluations and from basic research on child development, we conclude that welfare reform can affect children in diverse ways. These effects will vary depending on state and local policies, family characteristics and risk status, patterns of maternal employment, and children’s experiences in the home and in nonmaternal care settings. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kramer, Fredrica D.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1998

    This document examines strategies for promoting job retention and career advancement for recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). The document begins by considering the problems faced by less-skilled TANF recipients in finding, retaining, and advancing in jobs. Section 2 examines the following policy issues: (1) the aims of retention and advancement strategies; (2) the issue of whether retention and advancement strategies are separable; (3) recipients who should be targeted for services; (4) situations where services should be offered; (5) ways services should be delivered; and (6) program options (providing traditional support services; providing a broader range of services for the hard-to-place; using extended case management; mentoring; providing employer support; expanding access to good jobs; creating good jobs by filling niches; transforming job cyclers into strategic job movers; creating employer consortia; combining literacy, other basic education, and continued skills training with work; using public service employment and community work experience...

    This document examines strategies for promoting job retention and career advancement for recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). The document begins by considering the problems faced by less-skilled TANF recipients in finding, retaining, and advancing in jobs. Section 2 examines the following policy issues: (1) the aims of retention and advancement strategies; (2) the issue of whether retention and advancement strategies are separable; (3) recipients who should be targeted for services; (4) situations where services should be offered; (5) ways services should be delivered; and (6) program options (providing traditional support services; providing a broader range of services for the hard-to-place; using extended case management; mentoring; providing employer support; expanding access to good jobs; creating good jobs by filling niches; transforming job cyclers into strategic job movers; creating employer consortia; combining literacy, other basic education, and continued skills training with work; using public service employment and community work experience programs). Section 3 reviews the findings of research about ways of expanding employment for welfare recipients. Section 4 profiles 21 innovative programs in the following categories: supporting new workers; supporting employers; and finding market niches and targeting high-wage jobs. The bibliography lists 10 resource contacts and 44 publications. (author abstract).

    The original hyperlink to this resource has been removed by the publisher. You may obtain a single use PDF by emailing the SSRC at ssrc@opressrc.org.

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