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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Doyle, Pat; Johantgen, Meg
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    In this paper we explore the potential of future health services administrative data systems to improve the measurement of poverty. We first discuss the current and proposed new methods of measuring poverty, focusing on the need and the difficulty in capturing out-of-pocket medical (OOP) costs in the context of a survey focused on economic issues. We then discuss a current data collection effort that may serve as a model for future compilation of administrative data (the Hospital Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), a federal-state-industry partnership in health care data, directed by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR)). We conclude with a discussion of how the OOP costs can be integrated into a measure of poverty.

    Out-of-pocket medical expenditures cannot be accurately measured with a few items in a survey otherwise focused on income, poverty, and program participation and thus must be imputed from an external source. Two sources are considered: special purpose surveys and general purpose administrative systems. Special purpose surveys offer the most...

    In this paper we explore the potential of future health services administrative data systems to improve the measurement of poverty. We first discuss the current and proposed new methods of measuring poverty, focusing on the need and the difficulty in capturing out-of-pocket medical (OOP) costs in the context of a survey focused on economic issues. We then discuss a current data collection effort that may serve as a model for future compilation of administrative data (the Hospital Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), a federal-state-industry partnership in health care data, directed by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR)). We conclude with a discussion of how the OOP costs can be integrated into a measure of poverty.

    Out-of-pocket medical expenditures cannot be accurately measured with a few items in a survey otherwise focused on income, poverty, and program participation and thus must be imputed from an external source. Two sources are considered: special purpose surveys and general purpose administrative systems. Special purpose surveys offer the most promise in the short term but the quality of the imputed data suffers due to a highly skewed distribution of OOP costs. General purpose administrative systems, if they can be harnessed, offer the highest quality measure over the long term. The success of HCUP gives us hope that these data can eventually be harnessed thus we recommend a two pronged approach: statistical link to special purpose survey in the short term and development of and direct link to administrative systems over the long term. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Federman, Maya; Short, Kathleen; Cutter IV, W Bowman; Kiely, John; Levine, David; McDough, Duane; McMillen, Marilyn
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    To understand the relationship between poverty and living conditions, a multifaceted understanding of what it means to be poor is required. In one sense, the answer to the questions "What does it mean to be poor?" is straightforward - having cash income below the official poverty line for a given family size. In a broader sense, the living conditions of the poor are difficult to measure, both because annual cash income is only one factor related to living conditions, and because the poor are quite heterogeneous. 

    This article represents an effort to get closer to the answer by summarizing findings from nine national surveys that shed light on the living conditions of individuals living in poor and nonpoor families. It differs from earlier examinations of living conditions and the material well-being of American families in that it draws upon a broader set of household surveys and attempts to maximize uniformity in the definition of family types and poverty. This work represents a coordinated effort of representatives of various Federal agencies that produce and analyze...

    To understand the relationship between poverty and living conditions, a multifaceted understanding of what it means to be poor is required. In one sense, the answer to the questions "What does it mean to be poor?" is straightforward - having cash income below the official poverty line for a given family size. In a broader sense, the living conditions of the poor are difficult to measure, both because annual cash income is only one factor related to living conditions, and because the poor are quite heterogeneous. 

    This article represents an effort to get closer to the answer by summarizing findings from nine national surveys that shed light on the living conditions of individuals living in poor and nonpoor families. It differs from earlier examinations of living conditions and the material well-being of American families in that it draws upon a broader set of household surveys and attempts to maximize uniformity in the definition of family types and poverty. This work represents a coordinated effort of representatives of various Federal agencies that produce and analyze data from nationally representative surveys. The aim in this process has been to produce measurements of material well-being for an expanded set of dimensions, following a methodology that would promote comparability across surveys as much as possible. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Gomby, Deanna S.; Krantzler, Nora; Larner, Mary B.; Stevenson, Carol S.; Terman, Donna L.; Behrman, Richard E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    This Analysis begins with a brief description of current funding for child care services and continues with a review of the problems in the child care system. Main proposals for reform of child care financing are described. The Analysis next estimates costs for these plans and examines some of the ways that necessary additional dollars could be raised. Principles to guide any financing reform are suggested, and the Analysis concludes with a discussion of the prospects for change. (author introduction)

    This Analysis begins with a brief description of current funding for child care services and continues with a review of the problems in the child care system. Main proposals for reform of child care financing are described. The Analysis next estimates costs for these plans and examines some of the ways that necessary additional dollars could be raised. Principles to guide any financing reform are suggested, and the Analysis concludes with a discussion of the prospects for change. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Walker, James R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    This article proposes two financing plans to address what the author identifies as the two primary concerns in the child care field: (1) a child allowance for poor and near-poor households to address the child care problems of low-income families, and (2) a program of voluntary parental leave, available to all parents at child birth or adoption, to ensure the adequacy of infant care.

    The child allowance plan would cover the first three children in families up to 175% of the poverty level (more than 22 million children) at an annual cost of $45 billion. The author suggests that the allowance could be financed by redirecting funds from existing income support (for example, Aid to Families with Dependent Children), tax credit, and tax deduction programs.

    Financing the parental leave program would require new revenues, generated by an employee-paid increase in payroll tax totaling 3.5%. Each employee's contributions would create a parental leave account (PLA). Families could use the funds in these accounts to cover the cost of a one-year leave from work after the birth...

    This article proposes two financing plans to address what the author identifies as the two primary concerns in the child care field: (1) a child allowance for poor and near-poor households to address the child care problems of low-income families, and (2) a program of voluntary parental leave, available to all parents at child birth or adoption, to ensure the adequacy of infant care.

    The child allowance plan would cover the first three children in families up to 175% of the poverty level (more than 22 million children) at an annual cost of $45 billion. The author suggests that the allowance could be financed by redirecting funds from existing income support (for example, Aid to Families with Dependent Children), tax credit, and tax deduction programs.

    Financing the parental leave program would require new revenues, generated by an employee-paid increase in payroll tax totaling 3.5%. Each employee's contributions would create a parental leave account (PLA). Families could use the funds in these accounts to cover the cost of a one-year leave from work after the birth or adoption of a child. If families did not have enough dollars in their accounts to cover the cost of the leave, the federal government would extend a low-interest loan to them, which they would have to pay back. The amount individuals receive through Social Security would be adjusted upward or downward according to the balances in their parental leave accounts at retirement.

    The author suggests that both proposals would help parents balance work and family obligations and protect parental freedom of choice over the care and upbringing of their children. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Goldberg, Lenny M.; Schulz, Thomas W.; Piel, Michele
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    Three authors respond to proposals by their fellow authors in Volume 6, Issue 2 of The Future of Children, titled Financing Child Care. These proposals are described in the articles "Funding Child Care and Public Education" by Edward F. Zigler and Matia Finn-Stevenson, and "Funding Child Rearing: Child Allowance and Parental Leave" by James R. Walker.

    Three authors respond to proposals by their fellow authors in Volume 6, Issue 2 of The Future of Children, titled Financing Child Care. These proposals are described in the articles "Funding Child Care and Public Education" by Edward F. Zigler and Matia Finn-Stevenson, and "Funding Child Rearing: Child Allowance and Parental Leave" by James R. Walker.

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