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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Farr, Nick; Dolbeare, Cushing N.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    Lead poisoning is the Nation’s number one children’s environmental health problem. Children are poisoned primarily by ingesting lead from household dust in older, low-rent housing. The best way to prevent this situation is to make housing in which young children live or are likely to live lead safe. The Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction and Financing Task Force recommended a set of lead-safe standards that would protect children and would be feasible for property owners. It also proposed that, if a resident child were found to have an elevated blood lead level, owners who could document compliance with the standards be afforded some liability relief. Complying owners would then become eligible for liability insurance and financing. HUD is working with State and local governments and the real estate, lending, and insurance industries to develop programs to implement the Task Force’s recommendations. (Author abstract)

     

    Lead poisoning is the Nation’s number one children’s environmental health problem. Children are poisoned primarily by ingesting lead from household dust in older, low-rent housing. The best way to prevent this situation is to make housing in which young children live or are likely to live lead safe. The Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction and Financing Task Force recommended a set of lead-safe standards that would protect children and would be feasible for property owners. It also proposed that, if a resident child were found to have an elevated blood lead level, owners who could document compliance with the standards be afforded some liability relief. Complying owners would then become eligible for liability insurance and financing. HUD is working with State and local governments and the real estate, lending, and insurance industries to develop programs to implement the Task Force’s recommendations. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Brooks, Margaret G.; Buckner, John C.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    Within the context of a cross-sectional epidemiological study of 220 homeless and 216 low-income housed mothers, the present study examined the work experiences, barriers to employment, and facilitating factors such as education and literacy that increase the likelihood of work among low-income women. Analyses were focused on sociodemographic variables such as age, race, and marital status. Findings suggest the need for programs of education, early intervention, and job training. However, the availability of adequate jobs and affordable child care are prerequisites for poor, single mothers to become self-supporting. (author abstract)

    Within the context of a cross-sectional epidemiological study of 220 homeless and 216 low-income housed mothers, the present study examined the work experiences, barriers to employment, and facilitating factors such as education and literacy that increase the likelihood of work among low-income women. Analyses were focused on sociodemographic variables such as age, race, and marital status. Findings suggest the need for programs of education, early intervention, and job training. However, the availability of adequate jobs and affordable child care are prerequisites for poor, single mothers to become self-supporting. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Burkhauser, Richard V.; Couch, Kenneth A.; Glenn, Andrew J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1995

    This paper documents the declining relationship between low hourly wages and low household income over the last half-century and how this has reduced the share of minimum wage workers who live in poor households. It then compares recent and prospective increases in the earned income tax credit (EITC) and the minimum wage as methods of increasing the labor earnings of poor workers. Data from the Current Population Survey (CPS) are used to simulate the effects of both programs. Increases in the EITC between 1989 and 1992 delivered a much larger proportion of a given dollar of benefits to the poor than did increases in the minimum wage from $3.35 to $4.25. Scheduled increases in the EITC through 1996 will also do far more for the working poor than raising the minimum wage. (author abstract)

    This paper documents the declining relationship between low hourly wages and low household income over the last half-century and how this has reduced the share of minimum wage workers who live in poor households. It then compares recent and prospective increases in the earned income tax credit (EITC) and the minimum wage as methods of increasing the labor earnings of poor workers. Data from the Current Population Survey (CPS) are used to simulate the effects of both programs. Increases in the EITC between 1989 and 1992 delivered a much larger proportion of a given dollar of benefits to the poor than did increases in the minimum wage from $3.35 to $4.25. Scheduled increases in the EITC through 1996 will also do far more for the working poor than raising the minimum wage. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kemple, James J.; Friedlander, Daniel; Fellerath, Veronica
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1995

    This is the final report of a five-year evaluation of Florida’s statewide Project Independence program — Florida’s version of the federal-state Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS) Program. The program was intended to reduce public assistance costs by assisting welfare recipients to become self-sufficient. Project Independence emphasized relatively low-cost, independent job search services for the majority of its recipients and provided more expensive education and training services for those considered least able to find work on their own.

    The study found that for women with school-age children, Project Independence was effective, modestly increasing their employment and earnings and reducing their reliance on welfare, at no net cost to taxpayers. But for women with younger children, for whom child care outlays were higher and the program’s achievements smaller, taxpayers lost money and welfare families had less income. (author abstract)

    This is the final report of a five-year evaluation of Florida’s statewide Project Independence program — Florida’s version of the federal-state Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS) Program. The program was intended to reduce public assistance costs by assisting welfare recipients to become self-sufficient. Project Independence emphasized relatively low-cost, independent job search services for the majority of its recipients and provided more expensive education and training services for those considered least able to find work on their own.

    The study found that for women with school-age children, Project Independence was effective, modestly increasing their employment and earnings and reducing their reliance on welfare, at no net cost to taxpayers. But for women with younger children, for whom child care outlays were higher and the program’s achievements smaller, taxpayers lost money and welfare families had less income. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rittner, Barbara; Kirk, Alan B.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1995

    This study presents survey data on low-income elderly people who attended daytime meal programs. The survey examined sociocultural and quality of life variables as they affected use of health care and transportation services. Most of the respondents self-reported their health status as poor or very poor, and more than half had no medical care during the preceding six months despite the presence of multiple physical symptoms. Social isolation from family or neighborhood support systems exacerbated problems with transportation, and most of the elderly people relied on public transportation to gain access to health services. Public transportation services posed additional barriers to health care use, among them fear.  (author abstract)

    This study presents survey data on low-income elderly people who attended daytime meal programs. The survey examined sociocultural and quality of life variables as they affected use of health care and transportation services. Most of the respondents self-reported their health status as poor or very poor, and more than half had no medical care during the preceding six months despite the presence of multiple physical symptoms. Social isolation from family or neighborhood support systems exacerbated problems with transportation, and most of the elderly people relied on public transportation to gain access to health services. Public transportation services posed additional barriers to health care use, among them fear.  (author abstract)

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