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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Wiedrich, Kasey; Griffin, Kate; Chilton, Mariana; Lehman, Gretchen
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    Studies show that low-income families are more likely to be unbanked and “underbanked” than families with higher earnings. Lacking a bank account or depending on alternative financial services leads to significant financial barriers for low-income families that hinder economic growth and social mobility. This session will evaluate strategies that local and state human services agencies are testing to equip TANF recipients with the financial knowledge and resources they need to overcome barriers to financial security, including ACF’s Asset Initiative Partnership. Gretchen Lehman (Administration for Children and Families) will moderate this session.

    • Financial Counseling and Financial Access for the Financially Vulnerable

    Kasey Wiedrich (Corporation for Enterprise Development)

    The presentation examines financial management strategies among low-income families.  Two research studies are described: Children's HealthWatch and Witnesses to Hunger.

    • Building Economic Self-Sufficiency of TANF Clients Through Financial Education and Matched Savings

    ...

    Studies show that low-income families are more likely to be unbanked and “underbanked” than families with higher earnings. Lacking a bank account or depending on alternative financial services leads to significant financial barriers for low-income families that hinder economic growth and social mobility. This session will evaluate strategies that local and state human services agencies are testing to equip TANF recipients with the financial knowledge and resources they need to overcome barriers to financial security, including ACF’s Asset Initiative Partnership. Gretchen Lehman (Administration for Children and Families) will moderate this session.

    • Financial Counseling and Financial Access for the Financially Vulnerable

    Kasey Wiedrich (Corporation for Enterprise Development)

    The presentation examines financial management strategies among low-income families.  Two research studies are described: Children's HealthWatch and Witnesses to Hunger.

    • Building Economic Self-Sufficiency of TANF Clients Through Financial Education and Matched Savings

    Kate Griffin (Corporation for Enterprise Development)

    The presentation describes data from a financial education program for TANF recipients that provides training in budgeting and credit management.  The pilot was started in July 2013 with the Utah Department of Workforce Services.

    • Financial Management Strategies of TANF and SNAP Recipients: Lessons for Policy Makers and Administrators

    Mariana Chilton (Drexel University)

    The presentation describes a completed research project that looks at the impact of the AFCO financial counseling program for families leaving TANF and entering into a work-ready context.

    These presentations were given at the 2014 Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC).

  • Individual Author: Hong, Philip Young P.; Pandey, Shanta
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    This article contributes to the body of knowledge by examining the differential effects of three dimensions of human capital—education, training, and health—on the poor and upper income categories. We tested the effects using binomial and multinomial logistic regression analyses of working age individuals. The study revealed that these human capital variables are strong predictors of poverty in the binomial model but have greater effects on the near-poor than the poor in the multinomial model. This may provide evidence for social exclusion of the poor, due to their structural vulnerability in the labor market. Implications are made for a comprehensive workforce development strategy that combine human capital development and labor market inclusion. (author abstract)

    This article contributes to the body of knowledge by examining the differential effects of three dimensions of human capital—education, training, and health—on the poor and upper income categories. We tested the effects using binomial and multinomial logistic regression analyses of working age individuals. The study revealed that these human capital variables are strong predictors of poverty in the binomial model but have greater effects on the near-poor than the poor in the multinomial model. This may provide evidence for social exclusion of the poor, due to their structural vulnerability in the labor market. Implications are made for a comprehensive workforce development strategy that combine human capital development and labor market inclusion. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: McEwen, Craig A.; McEwen, Bruce S.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Why are children of poor parents more likely to be poor as adults than other children? Early-childhood adversities resulting from social structures and relationships impact children's bodily systems and brain development through recurrent stress. These socially patterned biological processes influence social reproduction. Social support and interventions can prevent or compensate for the early biological effects of toxic social environments. This article integrates sociological, neuroscience, epigenetic, and psychological evidence to build a model of early-childhood developmental mechanisms contributing to intergenerational poverty. This model captures ways in which social structures interact with biological characteristics and systems to shape life trajectories. (Author abstract)

    Why are children of poor parents more likely to be poor as adults than other children? Early-childhood adversities resulting from social structures and relationships impact children's bodily systems and brain development through recurrent stress. These socially patterned biological processes influence social reproduction. Social support and interventions can prevent or compensate for the early biological effects of toxic social environments. This article integrates sociological, neuroscience, epigenetic, and psychological evidence to build a model of early-childhood developmental mechanisms contributing to intergenerational poverty. This model captures ways in which social structures interact with biological characteristics and systems to shape life trajectories. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Braun, R. Anton ; Kopecky, Karen A.; Koreshkova, Tatyana
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Poor heath, large acute and long-term care medical expenses, and spousal death are significant drivers of impoverishment among retirees. We document these facts and build a rich, overlapping generations model that reproduces them. We use the model to assess the incentive and welfare effects of Social Security and means-tested social insurance programs such as Medicaid and food stamp programs, for the aged. We find that U.S. means-tested social insurance programs for retirees provide significant welfare benefits for all newborn. Moreover, when means-tested social insurance benefits are of the scale in the United States, all individuals would prefer to be born into an economy with no Social Security. Finally, we find that the benefits of increasing means-tested social insurance are small or negative, if we hold fixed Social Security contributions and benefits at their current levels. (Author abstract)

    Poor heath, large acute and long-term care medical expenses, and spousal death are significant drivers of impoverishment among retirees. We document these facts and build a rich, overlapping generations model that reproduces them. We use the model to assess the incentive and welfare effects of Social Security and means-tested social insurance programs such as Medicaid and food stamp programs, for the aged. We find that U.S. means-tested social insurance programs for retirees provide significant welfare benefits for all newborn. Moreover, when means-tested social insurance benefits are of the scale in the United States, all individuals would prefer to be born into an economy with no Social Security. Finally, we find that the benefits of increasing means-tested social insurance are small or negative, if we hold fixed Social Security contributions and benefits at their current levels. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Welsch, Heidi S.
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2006

    This dissertation examined how social outcomes relate to the geographic patterns of economic segregation in metropolitan statistical areas of the United States. The design of this project involved collection and analysis of geographic and demographic data across a sample of Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA's). U.S. Census data were used to analyze the spatial relationships between areas with a concentration of households in poverty and areas with a concentration of households with high-incomes. Data on nine widely accepted indicators of social well-being were collected at a county and MSA level from a variety of sources and statistically analyzed for patterns that correlate with geographic attributes.

    The study found that the geographic attributes of areas of poverty and areas of high-income showed limited significant correlation measures with each other. However, many measures of social well-being correlated in statistically significant ways based on geographic attributes of concentrations of poverty and high-income. This was true for all three types of geographic...

    This dissertation examined how social outcomes relate to the geographic patterns of economic segregation in metropolitan statistical areas of the United States. The design of this project involved collection and analysis of geographic and demographic data across a sample of Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA's). U.S. Census data were used to analyze the spatial relationships between areas with a concentration of households in poverty and areas with a concentration of households with high-incomes. Data on nine widely accepted indicators of social well-being were collected at a county and MSA level from a variety of sources and statistically analyzed for patterns that correlate with geographic attributes.

    The study found that the geographic attributes of areas of poverty and areas of high-income showed limited significant correlation measures with each other. However, many measures of social well-being correlated in statistically significant ways based on geographic attributes of concentrations of poverty and high-income. This was true for all three types of geographic attributes that were tested--proportion (or relative quantity), distance, and concentration magnitude.

    The study concludes that issues of concentrated poverty must be seen in a metropolitan or regional context. Solutions to concentrated poverty must look further than the people and places of poverty. Furthermore, the study has suggested that it is not just the proportion or location of concentrated poverty that affects social outcomes. The spatial and geographic relationships between and among different segments of society correlated to social outcomes for the entire community. Finally, a brief examination of existing policies and programs aimed at reducing poverty were examined to suggest how the findings of this study might be taken into account in the future. (author abstract)

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