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  • Individual Author: King, Christopher; Chase-Lansdale, Lindsay; Small, Mario
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2015

    Two Generations. One Future: An Anthology from the Ascend Fellowship, edited by Dr. Christopher King; Dr. P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale; and Dr. Mario Small, offers insights into 2-Gen 2.0 approaches spearheaded by 20 leaders from across sectors, including the fields of human services, mental health, justice-involved families, and early childhood. It is divided into three sections: 1) Underpinnings of two-generation strategies; 2) Address and empowering families; 3) Innovative policies and programs; and 4) Evaluating and fostering two-generation strategies.(author introduction)

    Table of Contents:

    INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW

    Introduction, Elliot Gerson and Anne Mosle

    2-Gen 2.0: An Overview, Editors Christopher T. King, P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale, and Mario Small

    Contributor Biographies

    Aspen Institute Ascend Fellows

    1. UNDERPINNINGS OF TWO-GENERATION STRATEGIES

    Gateways to Two Generations: The Potential for Early Childhood Programs and Partnerships to Support Children and...

    Two Generations. One Future: An Anthology from the Ascend Fellowship, edited by Dr. Christopher King; Dr. P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale; and Dr. Mario Small, offers insights into 2-Gen 2.0 approaches spearheaded by 20 leaders from across sectors, including the fields of human services, mental health, justice-involved families, and early childhood. It is divided into three sections: 1) Underpinnings of two-generation strategies; 2) Address and empowering families; 3) Innovative policies and programs; and 4) Evaluating and fostering two-generation strategies.(author introduction)

    Table of Contents:

    INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW

    Introduction, Elliot Gerson and Anne Mosle

    2-Gen 2.0: An Overview, Editors Christopher T. King, P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale, and Mario Small

    Contributor Biographies

    Aspen Institute Ascend Fellows

    1. UNDERPINNINGS OF TWO-GENERATION STRATEGIES

    Gateways to Two Generations: The Potential for Early Childhood Programs and Partnerships to Support Children and Parents Together, Joan Lombardi, Anne Mosle, Nisha Patel, Rachel Schumacher, and Jennifer Stedron

    Two-Generation Programs in the 21st Century, P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn

    Reflections, Wes Moore

    2. ADDRESS AND EMPOWERING FAMILIES

    Seeking Stable Futures: Parent Voices, Sarah Haight

    The Ties that Bind: How Child Care Centers Build Social Capital, Mario Small

    Moving Up Together: Lessons from the Family Interdependence Initiative, Mia Birdsong

    The Role of Asset Building in Generational Success, Andrea Levere, Kate Griffn, Emily Hoagland, Ezra Levin and Leigh Tivol

    Serving Justice-Involved Moms in a Two-Generation Program, Vivian D. Nixon

    The Case for Prevention: A Two-Generation Approach to Ending Child Abuse, Katie Albright, Genanne Walsh, Larry Yip, and Malcolm Gaines

    American MoJo: Building a For-Profit Social Enterprise that Truly Drives Impact, Cara Aley

    Out of Sync? Engaging Youth in Poverty Alleviation, Steve Liss

    3. INNOVATIVE POLICIES AND PROGRAMS

    Closing the School Readiness Gap through Two Generations, Henry Wilde

    Promoting Education: The Two-Generation Approach of the Community Action Project of Tulsa, OK, Teresa Eckrich Sommer, Terri Sabol, Tara Smith, Steven Dow, Monica Barczak, P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Hirokazu Yoshikawa, and Christopher T. King

    Building a Legacy of Family Success at Miami Dade College, Eduardo J. Padrón

    Jeremiah Program: Transforming Lives Two Generations at a Time, Gloria Perez

    Keys to Degrees: Educating Two Generations Together — an Innovative Postsecondary Program Supporting Two-Generation Mobility, Autumn Green and Richard Wylie

    Creating Bold Human Services for the 21st Century, Reggie Bicha

    4. EVALUATING AND FOSTERING TWO-GENERATION STRATEGIES

    Measuring the Results of Two-Generation Anti-Poverty Strategies, Christopher T. King and Donald J. Hernandez

    Connecting, Aligning, and Producing Intergenerational Success: The Ascend Network, Mekaelia Davis, Nisha Patel, and Anne Mosle

  • Individual Author: Kato, Linda Y.; Bowie, Stan L.; Gardenhire, Alissa; Kaljee, Linda; Liebow, Edward B.; Miller, Jennifer ; O’Malley, Gabrielle; Robinson, Elinor
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    Since 1997, the Jobs-Plus Community Revitalization Initiative for Public Housing Families has been under way at seven public housing developments in six cities across the nation. This ambitious employment initiative seeks to significantly raise employment levels and earnings of residents living in low-work, high-welfare public housing developments. Operating from an on-site job center at each development, Jobs-Plus targets employment assistance, financial incentives, and community supports for work to all working-age, nondisabled residents of a development. None of the programs began as fully formed interventions, evolving instead over several years. But with the exception of the one at the Chattanooga site, which became a financial-incentives-only program, all of the programs now offer all three of the Jobs-Plus components. The chapters of this report provide “snapshot” descriptions of Jobs-Plus as it has been operating at each of the six demonstration sites as of the summer of 2002. (author abstract)

    Since 1997, the Jobs-Plus Community Revitalization Initiative for Public Housing Families has been under way at seven public housing developments in six cities across the nation. This ambitious employment initiative seeks to significantly raise employment levels and earnings of residents living in low-work, high-welfare public housing developments. Operating from an on-site job center at each development, Jobs-Plus targets employment assistance, financial incentives, and community supports for work to all working-age, nondisabled residents of a development. None of the programs began as fully formed interventions, evolving instead over several years. But with the exception of the one at the Chattanooga site, which became a financial-incentives-only program, all of the programs now offer all three of the Jobs-Plus components. The chapters of this report provide “snapshot” descriptions of Jobs-Plus as it has been operating at each of the six demonstration sites as of the summer of 2002. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lein, Laura; Romich, Jennifer L.; Sherraden, Michael
    Reference Type: White Papers
    Year: 2016

    Extreme economic inequality has taken hold in the United States. Fostered in part by misguided policies and intentional choices, it can be reversed through purposeful action. However, social policies created for the industrial age face relentless political opposition and are not meeting the social welfare challenges of the information age. A new social contract is required. This paper elaborates key components of that contract, identifying social innovations to increase income at the bottom of society and reduce wealth disparities. Through such innovations, the United States can reverse extreme economic inequality. Because of social work’s history in addressing injustice and reforming policy, the profession is uniquely positioned to take on this challenge and has critical roles to play in addressing it. (Author abstract)

    Extreme economic inequality has taken hold in the United States. Fostered in part by misguided policies and intentional choices, it can be reversed through purposeful action. However, social policies created for the industrial age face relentless political opposition and are not meeting the social welfare challenges of the information age. A new social contract is required. This paper elaborates key components of that contract, identifying social innovations to increase income at the bottom of society and reduce wealth disparities. Through such innovations, the United States can reverse extreme economic inequality. Because of social work’s history in addressing injustice and reforming policy, the profession is uniquely positioned to take on this challenge and has critical roles to play in addressing it. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Siegel, David. I.; Abbott, Ann
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2007

    This study investigates a random sample of people who left welfare and a similar sample who returned to welfare in a mid-Atlantic state in 2002. Findings show that child-care difficulties are important barriers to employment and that they are bound together with other conditions of poverty such as adverse neighborhood conditions and other deprivations. Child care provision becomes difficult when neighborhoods are infested with drugs or guns or when caregivers must spend too much time finding the means to pay bills or rent and put food on the table. For the poorest groups, all these conditions negatively impact quality of life. The study's findings suggest social policy revisions that emphasize programs to improve the children's neighborhood environment and means of socialization, supplement caregivers' income to levels sufficient to pay for child care, and remove inadequacies or inconsistencies in government child care provision. (Author abstract)

    This study investigates a random sample of people who left welfare and a similar sample who returned to welfare in a mid-Atlantic state in 2002. Findings show that child-care difficulties are important barriers to employment and that they are bound together with other conditions of poverty such as adverse neighborhood conditions and other deprivations. Child care provision becomes difficult when neighborhoods are infested with drugs or guns or when caregivers must spend too much time finding the means to pay bills or rent and put food on the table. For the poorest groups, all these conditions negatively impact quality of life. The study's findings suggest social policy revisions that emphasize programs to improve the children's neighborhood environment and means of socialization, supplement caregivers' income to levels sufficient to pay for child care, and remove inadequacies or inconsistencies in government child care provision. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bailey, Martha J.; Danziger, Sheldon
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2013

    The War on Poverty initiated a new era of direct federal involvement in schools, hospitals, labor markets, and neighborhoods. This involvement engendered considerable controversy but has left a large footprint on the conceptualization, design, and implementation of antipoverty, social, and health policies; American politics; racial inequalities; and social science research. The chapters in this volume document many of the War on Poverty’s lasting legacies. Programs and policies enacted during this era influenced antipoverty legislation well into the 1970s when two major antipoverty programs, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), were enacted. This era’s programs and policies continue to define the social and health safety net today. (author abstract)

    Table of Contents

    1. Legacies of the War on Poverty/ Martha J. Bailey and Sheldon Danziger

    Part I: Increasing Human Capital, Employment, and Earnings

    2. Head Start Origins and Impacts/ Chloe Gibbs, Jens Ludwig, and Douglas L. Miller

    3. The K-12...

    The War on Poverty initiated a new era of direct federal involvement in schools, hospitals, labor markets, and neighborhoods. This involvement engendered considerable controversy but has left a large footprint on the conceptualization, design, and implementation of antipoverty, social, and health policies; American politics; racial inequalities; and social science research. The chapters in this volume document many of the War on Poverty’s lasting legacies. Programs and policies enacted during this era influenced antipoverty legislation well into the 1970s when two major antipoverty programs, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), were enacted. This era’s programs and policies continue to define the social and health safety net today. (author abstract)

    Table of Contents

    1. Legacies of the War on Poverty/ Martha J. Bailey and Sheldon Danziger

    Part I: Increasing Human Capital, Employment, and Earnings

    2. Head Start Origins and Impacts/ Chloe Gibbs, Jens Ludwig, and Douglas L. Miller

    3. The K-12 Education Battle/ Elizabeth Cascio and Sarah Reber

    4. Supporting Access to Higher Education/ Bridget Terry Long

    5. Workforce Development Programs/ Harry J. Holzer

    Part II: Raising Incomes and Living Standards

    6. The Safety Net for Families with Children/ Jane Waldfogel

    7. The Safety Net for the Elderly/ Kathleen McGarry

    8. Performance and Legacy of Housing Policies/ Edgar O. Olsen and Jens Ludwig

    Part III: Improving Access to Medical Care and Health

    9. Health Programs for Non-Elderly Adults and Children/ Barbara Wolfe

    10. Medicare and Medicaid/ Katherine Swartz

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