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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Mead, Lawrence
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1992

    Thirty years ago, the great national debate was how to help ordinary, workaday Americans achieve the good things in life. Today, we are preoccupied with—and increasingly divided over—how to cope with the problems of poor and dependent Americans, most of whom cannot or will not work at the jobs available. Mead provides overwhelming and disturbing evidence that passive poverty—the failure of most of the poor to work at all—reflects defeatism more than lack of opportunity. In this controversial book, Mead proposes concrete steps to overcome the inertia of the nonworking poor trapped in the welfare system. If the poor return to work, he suggests, American politics would focus once again on the problems of the working Americans. (publisher abstract)

    Thirty years ago, the great national debate was how to help ordinary, workaday Americans achieve the good things in life. Today, we are preoccupied with—and increasingly divided over—how to cope with the problems of poor and dependent Americans, most of whom cannot or will not work at the jobs available. Mead provides overwhelming and disturbing evidence that passive poverty—the failure of most of the poor to work at all—reflects defeatism more than lack of opportunity. In this controversial book, Mead proposes concrete steps to overcome the inertia of the nonworking poor trapped in the welfare system. If the poor return to work, he suggests, American politics would focus once again on the problems of the working Americans. (publisher abstract)

  • Individual Author: Jencks, Christopher
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1994

    How widespread is homelessness, how did it happen, and what can be done about it? These are the questions explored by Christopher Jencks, America’s foremost analyst of social problems. Jencks examines the standard explanations and finds that the deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill, the invention of crack cocaine, rising joblessness among men, declining marriage rates, cuts in welfare benefits, and the destruction of skid row have all played a role. Changes in the housing market have had less impact than many claim, however, and real federal housing subsidies actually doubled during the 1980s. Not confining his mission to studying the homeless, Jencks proposes several practical approaches to helping the homeless. (author abstract)

    How widespread is homelessness, how did it happen, and what can be done about it? These are the questions explored by Christopher Jencks, America’s foremost analyst of social problems. Jencks examines the standard explanations and finds that the deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill, the invention of crack cocaine, rising joblessness among men, declining marriage rates, cuts in welfare benefits, and the destruction of skid row have all played a role. Changes in the housing market have had less impact than many claim, however, and real federal housing subsidies actually doubled during the 1980s. Not confining his mission to studying the homeless, Jencks proposes several practical approaches to helping the homeless. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Holzer, Harry
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1996

    A very important contribution to the field of labor economics, and in particular to the understanding of the labor market for workers with relatively low skill levels. I think we have the sense that the market looks bad, but haven't been clear on how bad it is, or how it got that way. What Employers Want provides some of the answers and identifies the important questions. It is essential reading. —Jeffrey S. Zax, University of Colorado at Boulder

    The substantial deterioration in employment and earnings among the nation's less-educated workers, especially minorities and younger males in the nation's big cities, has been tentatively ascribed to a variety of causes: an increase in required job skills, the movement of companies from the cities to the suburbs, and a rising unwillingness to hire minority job seekers. What Employers Want is the first book to replace conjecture about today's job market with first-hand information gleaned from employers about who gets hired. Drawn from a survey of over 3,000 employers in four major metropolitan areas—Los Angeles, Boston, Atlanta,...

    A very important contribution to the field of labor economics, and in particular to the understanding of the labor market for workers with relatively low skill levels. I think we have the sense that the market looks bad, but haven't been clear on how bad it is, or how it got that way. What Employers Want provides some of the answers and identifies the important questions. It is essential reading. —Jeffrey S. Zax, University of Colorado at Boulder

    The substantial deterioration in employment and earnings among the nation's less-educated workers, especially minorities and younger males in the nation's big cities, has been tentatively ascribed to a variety of causes: an increase in required job skills, the movement of companies from the cities to the suburbs, and a rising unwillingness to hire minority job seekers. What Employers Want is the first book to replace conjecture about today's job market with first-hand information gleaned from employers about who gets hired. Drawn from a survey of over 3,000 employers in four major metropolitan areas—Los Angeles, Boston, Atlanta, and Detroit—this volume provides a wealth of data on what jobs are available to the less-educated, in what industries, what skills they require, where they are located, what they pay, and how they are filled.

    The evidence points to a dramatic surge in suburban, white-collar jobs. The manufacturing industry—once a steady employer of blue-collar workers—has been eclipsed by the expanding retail trade and service industries, where the vast majority of jobs are in clerical, managerial, or sales positions. Since manufacturing establishments have been the most likely employers to move from the central cities to the suburbs, the shortage of jobs for low-skill urban workers is particularly acute. In the central cities, the problem is compounded and available jobs remain vacant because employers increasingly require greater cognitive and social skills as well as specific job-related experience. Holzer reveals the extent to which minorities are routinely excluded by employer recruitment and screening practices that rely heavily on testing, informal referrals, and stable work histories. The inaccessible location and discriminatory hiring patterns of suburban employers further limit the hiring of black males in particular, while earnings, especially for minority females, remain low.

    Proponents of welfare reform often assume that stricter work requirements and shorter eligibility periods will effectively channel welfare recipients toward steady employment and off federal subsidies. What Employers Want directly challenges this premise and demonstrates that only concerted efforts to close the gap between urban employers and inner city residents can produce healthy levels of employment in the nation's cities. Professor Holzer outlines the measures that will be necessary—targeted education and training programs, improved transportation and job placement, heightened enforcement of anti-discrimination laws, and aggressive job creation strategies. Repairing urban labor markets will not be easy. This book shows why. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Ellwood, David R.; Bane, Mary Jo
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1996

    Mary Jo Bane and David Ellwood examine the American welfare system--its recipients, its providers, and the swirl of policy ideas surrounding it--with objectivity and clarity. Focusing on the AFDC Program (Aid to Families with Dependent Children), they identify three models that have been used to explain "welfare dependency" and test them against an accumulating body of evidence, offering suggestions for identifying potential long-term recipients so that resources can be targeted to encourage self-sufficiency. (publisher abstract)

    Mary Jo Bane and David Ellwood examine the American welfare system--its recipients, its providers, and the swirl of policy ideas surrounding it--with objectivity and clarity. Focusing on the AFDC Program (Aid to Families with Dependent Children), they identify three models that have been used to explain "welfare dependency" and test them against an accumulating body of evidence, offering suggestions for identifying potential long-term recipients so that resources can be targeted to encourage self-sufficiency. (publisher abstract)

  • Individual Author: O'Neill, David M. ; O'Neill, June Ellenoff
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1997

    O'Neill and O'Neill compile and analyze data that identifies historical trends in the AFDC caseload, the personal characteristics of recipients, and broad patterns of welfare participation. They also offer an evaluative survey on the effectiveness of past education, training and workfare programs in reducing the AFDC caseload.

    The result is a book that offers thoughtful analyses on several crucial questions facing state policy makers as a result of welfare. (Publisher abstract)

     

    Contents

    1 Introduction

    Notes

    2 Program Description and Sources of Caseload Growth

    Program Description

    Sources of Caseload Growth

    Notes

    3 Patterns of Welfare and Work Participation and Their Correlates

    Overview of Welfare Participation

    Incidence and Duration of Welfare Participation: The Role of Marital Status and Age of Birth of First Child

    Characteristics of Nonparticipants and of Welfare Leavers and Stayers

    Work Outcomes of Former Welfare Recipients

    ...

    O'Neill and O'Neill compile and analyze data that identifies historical trends in the AFDC caseload, the personal characteristics of recipients, and broad patterns of welfare participation. They also offer an evaluative survey on the effectiveness of past education, training and workfare programs in reducing the AFDC caseload.

    The result is a book that offers thoughtful analyses on several crucial questions facing state policy makers as a result of welfare. (Publisher abstract)

     

    Contents

    1 Introduction

    Notes

    2 Program Description and Sources of Caseload Growth

    Program Description

    Sources of Caseload Growth

    Notes

    3 Patterns of Welfare and Work Participation and Their Correlates

    Overview of Welfare Participation

    Incidence and Duration of Welfare Participation: The Role of Marital Status and Age of Birth of First Child

    Characteristics of Nonparticipants and of Welfare Leavers and Stayers

    Work Outcomes of Former Welfare Recipients

    Notes

    4 The Effectiveness of Education, Work and Training Programs for Reducing Welfare Dependence

    Education, Work, and Training Programs for Post-teenage Mothers

    Education and Other Services Especially for Teenage Mothers

    Workfare

    Summary

    Notes

    5 Administrative and Incentive Changes Under the Jobs Program

    Administrative Objectives Under JOBS

    Program Experiments by State under the JOBS Waiver Program

    Notes

    6 Summary and Concluding Comments

    The Effect of Financial Incentives

    Characteristics of the Welfare Population

    The Effectiveness of Welfare-to-Work Programs

    Prevention Versus Rehabilitation

    Notes

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