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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Caputo, Richard K.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2001

    Economic mobility in a youth cohort (n = 1956) was examined between 1979 and 1997. Increasing percentages of youth were found to reside in families with no change in economic status stratified by class. The rate of economic stasis of youth living in affluent families was more than twice that of those in middle-income families and more than four times that of those in poor families. Little variation in economic mobility was found among affluent families stratified by sex and ethnicity/race, although white males had less downward mobility than black females. Greater variation in economic mobility was found among poor families, with white males having greater upward mobility than other males and white females having greater upward mobility than black females and males. Finally, education was positively related to economic mobility for most sub-groups, as was receipt of SSI, while receipt of AFDC/TANF decreased economic mobility only among white males. (Author abstract)

    Economic mobility in a youth cohort (n = 1956) was examined between 1979 and 1997. Increasing percentages of youth were found to reside in families with no change in economic status stratified by class. The rate of economic stasis of youth living in affluent families was more than twice that of those in middle-income families and more than four times that of those in poor families. Little variation in economic mobility was found among affluent families stratified by sex and ethnicity/race, although white males had less downward mobility than black females. Greater variation in economic mobility was found among poor families, with white males having greater upward mobility than other males and white females having greater upward mobility than black females and males. Finally, education was positively related to economic mobility for most sub-groups, as was receipt of SSI, while receipt of AFDC/TANF decreased economic mobility only among white males. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Haskins, Ron; Isaacs, Julia B.; Sawhill, Isabel V.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    Americans have long believed that those who work hard can achieve success and that each generation will be better off than the last one. This belief has made Americans more tolerant of growing inequality than the citizens of other advanced nations. But how much opportunity to get ahead actually exists in America? In this new volume, Brookings scholars Julia Isaacs, Isabel Sawhill and Ron Haskins summarize research and provide new evidence on both the extent of intergenerational mobility in the United States and the factors that influence it. (Author introduction)

    Americans have long believed that those who work hard can achieve success and that each generation will be better off than the last one. This belief has made Americans more tolerant of growing inequality than the citizens of other advanced nations. But how much opportunity to get ahead actually exists in America? In this new volume, Brookings scholars Julia Isaacs, Isabel Sawhill and Ron Haskins summarize research and provide new evidence on both the extent of intergenerational mobility in the United States and the factors that influence it. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Sharkey, Patrick; Elwert, Felix
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    This study examines how the neighborhood environments experienced over multiple generations of a family influence children's cognitive ability. Building on recent research showing strong continuity in neighborhood environments across generations of family members, the authors argue for a revised perspective on “neighborhood effects” that considers the ways in which the neighborhood environment in one generation may have a lingering impact on the next generation. To analyze multigenerational effects, the authors use newly developed methods designed to estimate unbiased treatment effects when treatments and confounders vary over time. The results confirm a powerful link between neighborhoods and cognitive ability that extends across generations. A family's exposure to neighborhood poverty across two consecutive generations reduces child cognitive ability by more than half a standard deviation. A formal sensitivity analysis suggests that results are robust to unobserved selection bias. (Author abstract)

    This study examines how the neighborhood environments experienced over multiple generations of a family influence children's cognitive ability. Building on recent research showing strong continuity in neighborhood environments across generations of family members, the authors argue for a revised perspective on “neighborhood effects” that considers the ways in which the neighborhood environment in one generation may have a lingering impact on the next generation. To analyze multigenerational effects, the authors use newly developed methods designed to estimate unbiased treatment effects when treatments and confounders vary over time. The results confirm a powerful link between neighborhoods and cognitive ability that extends across generations. A family's exposure to neighborhood poverty across two consecutive generations reduces child cognitive ability by more than half a standard deviation. A formal sensitivity analysis suggests that results are robust to unobserved selection bias. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Redd, Zakia; Karver, Tahilin Sanchez; Murphey, David; Moore, Kristin Anderson; Knewstub, Dylan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    As poverty has become more widespread in the United States, it is important to acknowledge the large body of research documenting the association between poverty or economic hardship and negative outcomes for parents, especially women, and their children. One of the primary concerns about families living in poverty, particularly single parents and children, is that, due to their limited financial resources, they may experience material hardships and struggle to meet basic needs for food, housing, clothing, and so on. However, research on poverty finds that its effects extend beyond purchasing power and into other aspects of life...

    This brief draws on data from the U.S. Census Bureau, and presents a sharpened two-generation lens on the poverty and low-income status of children and families during the first decade of the 21st century. In addition, it presents data on differences in poverty and low-income status across race and ethnic origin, age, family structure, gender, education, full-time employment status, and geography. The brief is organized into four sections and...

    As poverty has become more widespread in the United States, it is important to acknowledge the large body of research documenting the association between poverty or economic hardship and negative outcomes for parents, especially women, and their children. One of the primary concerns about families living in poverty, particularly single parents and children, is that, due to their limited financial resources, they may experience material hardships and struggle to meet basic needs for food, housing, clothing, and so on. However, research on poverty finds that its effects extend beyond purchasing power and into other aspects of life...

    This brief draws on data from the U.S. Census Bureau, and presents a sharpened two-generation lens on the poverty and low-income status of children and families during the first decade of the 21st century. In addition, it presents data on differences in poverty and low-income status across race and ethnic origin, age, family structure, gender, education, full-time employment status, and geography. The brief is organized into four sections and ends with a summary of findings. Following this overview and a brief summary of the poverty data referenced in this brief, the first section focuses on the two-generation frame of family households with children, highlighting the shifting family structure of families in the United States; the second section focuses on children; the third section focuses on adults; and the fourth section highlights geographic areas with a high concentration of poverty. The brief concludes with a summary of important distinctions in the patterns of poverty and low-income status across a number of different categories. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Scott, Molly M.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    This presentation describes successes and challenges with the Housing Opportunities & Services Together (HOST) demonstration, a housing-based case management and wraparound services program for adults, with child engagement strategies (i.e., two-generation strategy).

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    This presentation describes successes and challenges with the Housing Opportunities & Services Together (HOST) demonstration, a housing-based case management and wraparound services program for adults, with child engagement strategies (i.e., two-generation strategy).

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

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