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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Coleman, Lester; Glenn, Fiona
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    This review of international literature assesses the impacts that the relationship breakdown of parents has on children and factors that can provide support should this occur. The parental separation process causes significant albeit short-term distress for most children, with a minority reporting longer-term outcomes such as socio-economic disadvantage, behavioural problems, poor educational achievement, and physical and emotional health problems. Factors increasing the likelihood of sustained disadvantage include: poverty; poor parent–child relationships; continuing parental conflict, multiple transitions in family formation; and poor maternal mental health. Supporting the factors that can improve child outcomes, exploring opportune ways to strengthen couple and family relationships, and integrating the views of children (for example, in court-based dispute resolution) are the leading implications for practice and policy. (Author abstract)

     

    This review of international literature assesses the impacts that the relationship breakdown of parents has on children and factors that can provide support should this occur. The parental separation process causes significant albeit short-term distress for most children, with a minority reporting longer-term outcomes such as socio-economic disadvantage, behavioural problems, poor educational achievement, and physical and emotional health problems. Factors increasing the likelihood of sustained disadvantage include: poverty; poor parent–child relationships; continuing parental conflict, multiple transitions in family formation; and poor maternal mental health. Supporting the factors that can improve child outcomes, exploring opportune ways to strengthen couple and family relationships, and integrating the views of children (for example, in court-based dispute resolution) are the leading implications for practice and policy. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Horning, Melissa L. ; Fulkerson, Jayne A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Objectives: As obesity rates remain alarmingly high, the importance of healthful diets is emphasized; however, affordability of such diets is disputed. Market basket surveys (MBSs) investigate the affordability of diets for families that meet minimum daily dietary requirements using actual food prices from grocery stores. This review paper describes the methods of MBSs, summarizes methodology, price and affordability findings, limitations, and suggests related policy and practice implications. Design and Sample: This is a systematic review of 16 MBSs performed in the United States from 1985 to 2012. A comprehensive multidisciplinary database search strategy was used to identify articles meeting inclusion criteria. Results: Results indicated MBS methodology varied across studies and price data indicated healthful diets for families are likely unaffordable when purchased from small- to medium-sized stores and may be unaffordable in larger stores when compared to the Thrifty Food Plan. Conclusions: Using a social ecological approach, public health nurses and all public health...

    Objectives: As obesity rates remain alarmingly high, the importance of healthful diets is emphasized; however, affordability of such diets is disputed. Market basket surveys (MBSs) investigate the affordability of diets for families that meet minimum daily dietary requirements using actual food prices from grocery stores. This review paper describes the methods of MBSs, summarizes methodology, price and affordability findings, limitations, and suggests related policy and practice implications. Design and Sample: This is a systematic review of 16 MBSs performed in the United States from 1985 to 2012. A comprehensive multidisciplinary database search strategy was used to identify articles meeting inclusion criteria. Results: Results indicated MBS methodology varied across studies and price data indicated healthful diets for families are likely unaffordable when purchased from small- to medium-sized stores and may be unaffordable in larger stores when compared to the Thrifty Food Plan. Conclusions: Using a social ecological approach, public health nurses and all public health professionals are prime advocates for increased affordability of healthful foods. This study includes policy advocacy, particularly in support of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits for low-income families. Future research implications are provided, including methodological recommendations for consistency and quality of forthcoming MBS research. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Child maltreatment happens in all kinds of families, but low income is the most consistent predictor. This holds true in the United States and many other nations and the correlation is substantiated by decades of research. But new research goes beyond association to reveal a causal relationship between poverty and child maltreatment. A set of studies published in the journal Children and Youth Services Review shows that poverty exists as both a cause and consequence of child abuse and neglect. Just as child maltreatment is most prevalent in poor families, mistreated children often struggle to achieve economic success as adults. This brief describes the latest statistics on child maltreatment as reported to child protective services (CPS) agencies and goes on to highlight related findings from a limited selection of the studies included in the journal. (Author abstract)

    Child maltreatment happens in all kinds of families, but low income is the most consistent predictor. This holds true in the United States and many other nations and the correlation is substantiated by decades of research. But new research goes beyond association to reveal a causal relationship between poverty and child maltreatment. A set of studies published in the journal Children and Youth Services Review shows that poverty exists as both a cause and consequence of child abuse and neglect. Just as child maltreatment is most prevalent in poor families, mistreated children often struggle to achieve economic success as adults. This brief describes the latest statistics on child maltreatment as reported to child protective services (CPS) agencies and goes on to highlight related findings from a limited selection of the studies included in the journal. (Author abstract)