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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Isaacs, Julia B.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2001

    As large numbers of recipients leave the welfare rolls, interest in their circumstances is widespread. Are individuals working? Are they and their families
    moving out of poverty? How are their children faring? Do they continue to need and receive assistance through other programs? To answer these questions, the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), awarded $2.9 million in grants in
    fiscal year 1998 to fourteen states and large counties to track and monitor outcomes among families leaving welfare.1 Funded out of a special congressional appropriation, these grants were designed to collect data documenting what was happening to poor families after the sweeping changes in welfare legislation. This chapter provides an overview of the design of the ASPE-funded leavers studies and reviews major cross-study findings in three areas: employment, program participation, and household income. In each area, the chapter discusses how data from administrative records are enriched by the more detailed...

    As large numbers of recipients leave the welfare rolls, interest in their circumstances is widespread. Are individuals working? Are they and their families
    moving out of poverty? How are their children faring? Do they continue to need and receive assistance through other programs? To answer these questions, the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), awarded $2.9 million in grants in
    fiscal year 1998 to fourteen states and large counties to track and monitor outcomes among families leaving welfare.1 Funded out of a special congressional appropriation, these grants were designed to collect data documenting what was happening to poor families after the sweeping changes in welfare legislation. This chapter provides an overview of the design of the ASPE-funded leavers studies and reviews major cross-study findings in three areas: employment, program participation, and household income. In each area, the chapter discusses how data from administrative records are enriched by the more detailed findings emerging from surveys of former recipients. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Williams Shanks, Trina R.; Boddie, Stephanie C.; Rice, Solana
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    This research examines individual development account (IDA) programs as part of a broader community development strategy for low-income/low-wealth communities, particularly communities of color. Through a review of multiple literatures and detailed case studies, we explore the potential of explicitly creating a community-based, family-centered development account program as a step toward a comprehensive community asset building approach in low-income urban neighborhoods. From the perspective of IDA practitioners, such an approach provides program participants with local support networks and access to additional services. From the perspective of grassroots community organizers, such an approach provides tangible benefits to low-income residents of their neighborhoods. The likelihood of success may depend on the availability of local resources to build areas of strength and reduce vulnerabilities, but there are examples where a family-centered, community-based asset building approach seems to thrive. (Author abstract)

    This research examines individual development account (IDA) programs as part of a broader community development strategy for low-income/low-wealth communities, particularly communities of color. Through a review of multiple literatures and detailed case studies, we explore the potential of explicitly creating a community-based, family-centered development account program as a step toward a comprehensive community asset building approach in low-income urban neighborhoods. From the perspective of IDA practitioners, such an approach provides program participants with local support networks and access to additional services. From the perspective of grassroots community organizers, such an approach provides tangible benefits to low-income residents of their neighborhoods. The likelihood of success may depend on the availability of local resources to build areas of strength and reduce vulnerabilities, but there are examples where a family-centered, community-based asset building approach seems to thrive. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Forman, Benjamin; Koch, Caroline
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    A half century ago, Massachusetts was one of the country’s most egalitarian states. Today it has one of the most unequal income distributions. As income inequality has grown, so too has the degree of income segregation in regions across the state.

    The clustering of rich and poor into separate neighborhoods may have been a largely unavoidable symptom of the growing income gulf between rich and poor. But there are other potential explanations for increasing income segregation. For example, changes in land-use regulation and housing policy may lead to greater income segregation, too. Moreover, if income segregation acts as a drag on economic mobility, so that families in poorer neighborhoods fall further behind economically, or if it gives those in wealthier neighborhoods advantages that help them get further ahead, it may in itself lead to greater income inequality.

    We know surprisingly little about the factors that shape income segregation and how it interacts with income inequality, but new research exploring the relationship is starting to provide a better...

    A half century ago, Massachusetts was one of the country’s most egalitarian states. Today it has one of the most unequal income distributions. As income inequality has grown, so too has the degree of income segregation in regions across the state.

    The clustering of rich and poor into separate neighborhoods may have been a largely unavoidable symptom of the growing income gulf between rich and poor. But there are other potential explanations for increasing income segregation. For example, changes in land-use regulation and housing policy may lead to greater income segregation, too. Moreover, if income segregation acts as a drag on economic mobility, so that families in poorer neighborhoods fall further behind economically, or if it gives those in wealthier neighborhoods advantages that help them get further ahead, it may in itself lead to greater income inequality.

    We know surprisingly little about the factors that shape income segregation and how it interacts with income inequality, but new research exploring the relationship is starting to provide a better indication of how the state’s changing income distribution may contribute to neighborhood change. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Child Care Aware of America
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    More than 11 million children younger than age five are in some form of child care in the United States. The Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2016 Report summarizes the cost of child care across the country, examines the importance of child care as a workforce support and as an early learning program, and explores the effect of high costs on families' child care options. This year's report continues to expose child care as one of the most significant expenses in a family budget, often exceeding the cost of housing, college tuition, transportation, or food. In addition to our review of the average cost of care across the nation, Child Care Aware® of America examined county-level data in four states. We also provide a comprehensive set of solutions and policy recommendations to help address the high cost of child care for families across the country. (Author abstract)

    More than 11 million children younger than age five are in some form of child care in the United States. The Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2016 Report summarizes the cost of child care across the country, examines the importance of child care as a workforce support and as an early learning program, and explores the effect of high costs on families' child care options. This year's report continues to expose child care as one of the most significant expenses in a family budget, often exceeding the cost of housing, college tuition, transportation, or food. In addition to our review of the average cost of care across the nation, Child Care Aware® of America examined county-level data in four states. We also provide a comprehensive set of solutions and policy recommendations to help address the high cost of child care for families across the country. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ferguson, Daniel
    Reference Type: White Papers
    Year: 2017

    This Research-to-Policy Resource List provides a comprehensive list of city universal preschool initiative evaluations and research in the Research Connections collection. To count as universal, a city's program must aim to eventually provide universal access to publicly-funded preschool for all four-year-olds using at least some city funds, even if it does not currently achieve universal access. Some well-known programs do not meet these criteria, either because they are the city-based implementation of a state universal preschool program (Tulsa, Oklahoma) or because they do not aim for universal access (Chicago's Child-Parent Centers; Salt Lake City, Utah). Cities with universal preschool programs were identified in recent reviews by the American Institutes for Research and the Rand Corporation, as well as in news reports. A number of city programs have not produced evaluations or research publications or are still in the planning or early implementation stages, including Cincinnati, Ohio; Cleveland, Ohio; Dayton, Ohio; Santa Fe, New Mexico; Seattle, Washington; and West...

    This Research-to-Policy Resource List provides a comprehensive list of city universal preschool initiative evaluations and research in the Research Connections collection. To count as universal, a city's program must aim to eventually provide universal access to publicly-funded preschool for all four-year-olds using at least some city funds, even if it does not currently achieve universal access. Some well-known programs do not meet these criteria, either because they are the city-based implementation of a state universal preschool program (Tulsa, Oklahoma) or because they do not aim for universal access (Chicago's Child-Parent Centers; Salt Lake City, Utah). Cities with universal preschool programs were identified in recent reviews by the American Institutes for Research and the Rand Corporation, as well as in news reports. A number of city programs have not produced evaluations or research publications or are still in the planning or early implementation stages, including Cincinnati, Ohio; Cleveland, Ohio; Dayton, Ohio; Santa Fe, New Mexico; Seattle, Washington; and West Sacramento, California. The city universal preschool initiatives that have produced research or evaluation publications and are included here are: Boston, Massachusetts; Denver, Colorado; Los Angeles, California; New York, New York; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; San Antonio, Texas; San Francisco, California; and Washington, District of Columbia. (Author abstract)

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