Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Sorensen, Elaine; Turner, Mark
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    This review examines ways in which institutions and agencies act as barriers to paternal involvement, particularly for unmarried fathers and fathers of color. These fathers are frequently portrayed as unwilling, uninterested parents who must be forced by the government to take responsibility for their children, and this perspective lays the foundation for punitive policies and practices. The review begins by addressing research that has sought to determine the actual amount and kinds of support disadvantaged fathers provide for their children. The next sections describe how specific policies actually deter young men's involvement with their families and suggest ways of making legislation and social service agencies more conducive to fathers. The review concludes with recommendations for policy and future research. Throughout the review, the argument is made that while policies and practices may not actively seek to discourage paternal participation in the family, negative assumptions that result in the dismissal of fathers as viable parents result in fathers' disengagement. (...

    This review examines ways in which institutions and agencies act as barriers to paternal involvement, particularly for unmarried fathers and fathers of color. These fathers are frequently portrayed as unwilling, uninterested parents who must be forced by the government to take responsibility for their children, and this perspective lays the foundation for punitive policies and practices. The review begins by addressing research that has sought to determine the actual amount and kinds of support disadvantaged fathers provide for their children. The next sections describe how specific policies actually deter young men's involvement with their families and suggest ways of making legislation and social service agencies more conducive to fathers. The review concludes with recommendations for policy and future research. Throughout the review, the argument is made that while policies and practices may not actively seek to discourage paternal participation in the family, negative assumptions that result in the dismissal of fathers as viable parents result in fathers' disengagement. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kramer, Fredrica D.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1998

    This document examines strategies for promoting job retention and career advancement for recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). The document begins by considering the problems faced by less-skilled TANF recipients in finding, retaining, and advancing in jobs. Section 2 examines the following policy issues: (1) the aims of retention and advancement strategies; (2) the issue of whether retention and advancement strategies are separable; (3) recipients who should be targeted for services; (4) situations where services should be offered; (5) ways services should be delivered; and (6) program options (providing traditional support services; providing a broader range of services for the hard-to-place; using extended case management; mentoring; providing employer support; expanding access to good jobs; creating good jobs by filling niches; transforming job cyclers into strategic job movers; creating employer consortia; combining literacy, other basic education, and continued skills training with work; using public service employment and community work experience...

    This document examines strategies for promoting job retention and career advancement for recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). The document begins by considering the problems faced by less-skilled TANF recipients in finding, retaining, and advancing in jobs. Section 2 examines the following policy issues: (1) the aims of retention and advancement strategies; (2) the issue of whether retention and advancement strategies are separable; (3) recipients who should be targeted for services; (4) situations where services should be offered; (5) ways services should be delivered; and (6) program options (providing traditional support services; providing a broader range of services for the hard-to-place; using extended case management; mentoring; providing employer support; expanding access to good jobs; creating good jobs by filling niches; transforming job cyclers into strategic job movers; creating employer consortia; combining literacy, other basic education, and continued skills training with work; using public service employment and community work experience programs). Section 3 reviews the findings of research about ways of expanding employment for welfare recipients. Section 4 profiles 21 innovative programs in the following categories: supporting new workers; supporting employers; and finding market niches and targeting high-wage jobs. The bibliography lists 10 resource contacts and 44 publications. (author abstract).

    The original hyperlink to this resource has been removed by the publisher. You may obtain a single use PDF by emailing the SSRC at ssrc@opressrc.org.

  • Individual Author: Besharov, Douglas J.; Germanis, Peter
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1998

    In this volume, Glenn Loury, a professor of economics and director of the Institute on Race and Social Division at Boston University, assesses the research evidence on the effectiveness of five projects that sought to reduce subsequent births to mothers on welfare. The first two involved family caps on welfare benefits: the Arkansas Welfare Waiver Demonstration Project and the New Jersey Family Development Program. The second two involved enhanced family-planning services as part of broader interventions for teen parents: the New Chance Demonstration and the Teenage Parent Demonstration. The last one involved "authoritative" or "directive" counseling within a nurse home-visitor program: the Prenatal and Early Childhood Nurse Home-Visitation Program. Loury also examines the Dollar-a-Day program, which involved positive financial incentives for young mothers who did not become pregnant....

    In addition to Loury's paper, this volume contains a detailed assessment of the New Jersey study by Peter Rossi, professor emeritus at the University of Massachusetts (Amherst); it also...

    In this volume, Glenn Loury, a professor of economics and director of the Institute on Race and Social Division at Boston University, assesses the research evidence on the effectiveness of five projects that sought to reduce subsequent births to mothers on welfare. The first two involved family caps on welfare benefits: the Arkansas Welfare Waiver Demonstration Project and the New Jersey Family Development Program. The second two involved enhanced family-planning services as part of broader interventions for teen parents: the New Chance Demonstration and the Teenage Parent Demonstration. The last one involved "authoritative" or "directive" counseling within a nurse home-visitor program: the Prenatal and Early Childhood Nurse Home-Visitation Program. Loury also examines the Dollar-a-Day program, which involved positive financial incentives for young mothers who did not become pregnant....

    In addition to Loury's paper, this volume contains a detailed assessment of the New Jersey study by Peter Rossi, professor emeritus at the University of Massachusetts (Amherst); it also offers three comments from people closely associated with that project and other analysts: Michael Camasso at the School of Social Work and Center for Urban Policy Research, Rutgers University (and his colleagues); Michael Laracy, a senior program associate at the Annie E. Casey Foundation; and David Murray, director of research at the Statistical Assessment Service. Some of their comments support Loury's and Rossi's assessments, and some do not. This volume also includes an analysis of the New Jersey study from the Congressional Research Service. All of these materials are appended to this report so that readers can make their own judgements.

    Finally, this volume contains a paper by Michael Wiseman that presents the California estimates described above. Wiseman uses a longitudinal database to estimate the number of subsequent births to California welfare mothers in 1995, including an estimate of those who would have been subject to the family cap had that policy been in effect at that time. He finds that a significant number of children would have been subject to the family cap had it been in effect in 1995, and he provides estimates for the rate at which the number of children affected grows over time. His estimates highlight the importance of the issue. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Committee for Economic Development Research and Policy Committee
    Reference Type: Report, White Papers
    Year: 2000

    The signing of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) in 1996 fundamentally changed the welfare system in America. The emphasis shifted from supporting low-income people who do not work to helping low-income people work to support themselves. This report examines the record of welfare reform in the wider context of the low-skill labor market. It asks how former welfare recipients have fared in finding employment, reducing dependency, and raising incomes. Recommendations are made for completing and improving the program for moving individuals from welfare to work. (author abstract)

    The signing of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) in 1996 fundamentally changed the welfare system in America. The emphasis shifted from supporting low-income people who do not work to helping low-income people work to support themselves. This report examines the record of welfare reform in the wider context of the low-skill labor market. It asks how former welfare recipients have fared in finding employment, reducing dependency, and raising incomes. Recommendations are made for completing and improving the program for moving individuals from welfare to work. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kaye, Kelleen; Nightingale, Demetra Smith
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    Increased emphasis on moving welfare recipients into employment as a result of welfare reform has raised questions about the labor market facing low-wage workers. What are the characteristics of this market (as opposed to the labor market as a whole)? Will it be able to absorb the welfare leavers? How is it affected by changes in the larger economy? What opportunities do low-wage workers have for advancement once they enter the labor market?

    To help policy makers answer these questions, nine papers by experts in labor market analysis were commissioned by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, to review current literature on the low-wage market and highlight policy implications that flow from the review. (The Data Appendix provides a statistical portrait of the labor market as a whole and the characteristics of low-wage workers.)

    The important role of the low-wage labor market as welfare recipients and other economically disadvantaged persons move into employment is clear from the evidence...

    Increased emphasis on moving welfare recipients into employment as a result of welfare reform has raised questions about the labor market facing low-wage workers. What are the characteristics of this market (as opposed to the labor market as a whole)? Will it be able to absorb the welfare leavers? How is it affected by changes in the larger economy? What opportunities do low-wage workers have for advancement once they enter the labor market?

    To help policy makers answer these questions, nine papers by experts in labor market analysis were commissioned by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, to review current literature on the low-wage market and highlight policy implications that flow from the review. (The Data Appendix provides a statistical portrait of the labor market as a whole and the characteristics of low-wage workers.)

    The important role of the low-wage labor market as welfare recipients and other economically disadvantaged persons move into employment is clear from the evidence marshaled in the review. There is a strong consensus that this labor market will be able to absorb people leaving the rolls, as long as the economy retains its current strength. However, there is often little opportunity for job advancement in this market. Suggestions made by the authors for improving economic opportunity for low-wage workers include ways to increase wages and sustain income directly, improve labor market access and job retention, support occupational mobility and job advancement, and enhance employment security. (author abstract)

    Table of Contents

    Introduction and Overview/ Kelleen Kaye and Demetra Smith Nightingale

    Section I: What is the Low-Wage Labor Market and Has It Changed Over Time?

    • Defining and Characterizing the Low-Wage Labor Market/ Jared Bernstein and Heidi Hartmann
    • Low-Wage Labor Markets:  The Business Cycle and Regional Differences/ David M. Smith and Stephen A. Woodbury

    Section II:  Policies Affecting the Low-Wage Labor Market

    • Can the Labor Market Absorb Three Million Welfare Recipients?/ Gary Burtless
    • Does the Minimum Wage Help or Hurt Low-Wage Workers?/ Mark D. Turner
    • Job Creation for Low-Wage Workers:  An Assessment of Public Service Jobs, Tax Credits, and Empowerment Zones/ Burt S. Barnow

    Section III:  Barriers to Entering the Low-Wage Labor Market

    • Matching and Mismatch in the Low-wage Labor Market:  Hiring Perspective/ Harry Holzer
    • Matching and Mismatch in the Low-wage Labor Market:  Job Search Perspective/ Julia R. Henly

    Section IV:  Barriers to Advancement in the Low-Wage Labor Market

    • Work as a Stepping Stone for Low-Skilled Workers:  What is the Evidence?/ Peter Gottschalk
    • The Role of Job Turnover in the Low-Wage Labor Market/ Julia Lane

    APPENDIX:  Statistical Data and Background Information

    • Overall Labor Market
    • Factors Affecting Low-Wage Employment
    • Description of the Working Poor
    • Health Insurance and Other Benefits

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1996 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations