Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Peterson, Michael
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2002

    This literature review provides a comprehensive review of professional journals, web-based sites, and other related materials, (i.e. longitudinal studies, etc.), to determine what role Rehabilitation Services has played to date in the provision of services to welfare recipients who have disabilities and have been affected by The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996.

    A comprehensive exploration of a variety of literature has determined that many people within the roles of the welfare systems have disabilities which adversely affect their abilities to obtain or maintain work. Many of these individuals have document able physical and/or mental disabilities yet the welfare system lacks the expertise to effectively serve the population.

    Print and electronic literature will be examined and analyzed to determine the role Rehabilitation Services Administration has played in providing the required leadership, monies, and technical assistance necessary for helping this population gain self-sufficiency, retain welfare benefits, or obtain the...

    This literature review provides a comprehensive review of professional journals, web-based sites, and other related materials, (i.e. longitudinal studies, etc.), to determine what role Rehabilitation Services has played to date in the provision of services to welfare recipients who have disabilities and have been affected by The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996.

    A comprehensive exploration of a variety of literature has determined that many people within the roles of the welfare systems have disabilities which adversely affect their abilities to obtain or maintain work. Many of these individuals have document able physical and/or mental disabilities yet the welfare system lacks the expertise to effectively serve the population.

    Print and electronic literature will be examined and analyzed to determine the role Rehabilitation Services Administration has played in providing the required leadership, monies, and technical assistance necessary for helping this population gain self-sufficiency, retain welfare benefits, or obtain the necessary federal/state subsidy(ies) in order to sustain their quality of life.

    The literature evaluated provided evidence that Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) has initiated the appropriate leadership, monies, and technical assistance to meet the needs of the population. RSA has allocated funds for Research and Demonstration Projects to aide States in developing state-of-the-art programs that will in turn provide best practices on a national level for serving welfare recipients who have disabilities. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Brocksen, Sally M.
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2006

    This project employed a descriptive case study methodology guided by rational choice theory to examine the financial feasibility of marriage for low income women. By modeling the income and expenses of eight different low income family types in six states (Arizona, California, New York, Oklahoma, Virginia, and Wisconsin) this study illustrates the financial situation of various low income families. The family types under investigation include: a single parent family, a family receiving TANF, cohabiting couple with two wage earners, cohabiting couple with one wage earner, a married family with two wage earners, a married couple with one wage earner, a unmarried couple with an infant (unmarried fragile family), and a married couple with an infant (married fragile family). The income of each family type was calculated at two different wage levels (minimum and low wage for each state under investigation). Income included the welfare benefits and subsidies each of the family's is likely to receive (including child care subsidies and tax credits). The expenses of each family were...

    This project employed a descriptive case study methodology guided by rational choice theory to examine the financial feasibility of marriage for low income women. By modeling the income and expenses of eight different low income family types in six states (Arizona, California, New York, Oklahoma, Virginia, and Wisconsin) this study illustrates the financial situation of various low income families. The family types under investigation include: a single parent family, a family receiving TANF, cohabiting couple with two wage earners, cohabiting couple with one wage earner, a married family with two wage earners, a married couple with one wage earner, a unmarried couple with an infant (unmarried fragile family), and a married couple with an infant (married fragile family). The income of each family type was calculated at two different wage levels (minimum and low wage for each state under investigation). Income included the welfare benefits and subsidies each of the family's is likely to receive (including child care subsidies and tax credits). The expenses of each family were calculated based on the size of the family and the cost of expenses such as housing and food expenditures. This study found that of the models presented here married families are not always financially better off when compared to single parent and cohabiting families. These findings demonstrate that if policy makers wish to support marriage among low income families they should first make marriage financially feasible for unmarried couples (particularly cohabiting couples) and create greater economic stability for couples that are already married. By providing consistent work supports (e.g. child care and health insurance), expanding programs that help low income families (such as the Earned Income Tax Credit), creating poverty measures that accurately reflect the real situation of low income families, and increasing the wages of low income workers, policy makers will create an environment where it is financially feasible for low income couples to marry and remain married. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Herbst, Christopher M.
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2007

    Child care subsidies and the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) are vital government tools for increasing employment and reducing poverty among low-income families. This dissertation, therefore, explores many features of these policies, including their evolution, correlates of participation, and impacts on employment.

    Chapter 1 provides an overview of child care subsidies and the EITC, focusing on recent policy developments, labor supply incentives, and a critical review of the empirical employment literature.

    Chapter 2 explores why, despite substantial growth in funding, participation in child care subsidy programs remains comparatively low. Results suggest that although 30 percent of households with children are eligible for child care subsidies, take-up is 14 percent. The low take-up rate is driven by several factors: eligible non-recipients differ from recipients in ways that make subsidies unnecessary or undesirable; the practice by states to trade-off generosity in eligibility for additional generosity in benefits; and the practice by states to ration benefits...

    Child care subsidies and the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) are vital government tools for increasing employment and reducing poverty among low-income families. This dissertation, therefore, explores many features of these policies, including their evolution, correlates of participation, and impacts on employment.

    Chapter 1 provides an overview of child care subsidies and the EITC, focusing on recent policy developments, labor supply incentives, and a critical review of the empirical employment literature.

    Chapter 2 explores why, despite substantial growth in funding, participation in child care subsidy programs remains comparatively low. Results suggest that although 30 percent of households with children are eligible for child care subsidies, take-up is 14 percent. The low take-up rate is driven by several factors: eligible non-recipients differ from recipients in ways that make subsidies unnecessary or undesirable; the practice by states to trade-off generosity in eligibility for additional generosity in benefits; and the practice by states to ration benefits according to specific household characteristics.

    Chapter 3 examines the effects of child care costs and net-of-taxes wages on the employment of single mothers. Although a substantial literature estimates separately the impact of prices and taxes, no study has created a modeling framework that accounts for both factors simultaneously. Merging empirical techniques from previous child care and EITC studies yields employment elasticities of -0.174 and 0.711, respectively. An implication of this finding is that price-effects are considerably smaller than those reported elsewhere, while tax-effects accord with previous estimates. Results also suggest that single mothers became less responsive to prices and more responsive to taxes throughout the 1990s, especially after expansions to subsidy programs and the EITC.

    Chapter 4 investigates heterogeneous employment effects of social policy reforms across varying economic conditions. Allowing the effects of policy reforms on single mothers to vary with the economy leads to several interesting results. Policy "carrots" are more likely to reveal heterogeneous effects at low intensity work margins, while policy "sticks" show significant variation at increasingly demanding margins. However, all policies produce the largest employment effects in favorable economic conditions, implying that a strong economy reinforces the incentives created by social policy reforms. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rolle, Tara M.
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2009

    After the Great Depression there was a need for federal housing assistance programs to help alleviate some of the distress that many Americans were experiencing during the United States housing crisis. The Section 8 Tenant Based Program, which is federally funded by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), helps to provide thousands of Americans each year with safe, decent and sanitary housing; something they might not have otherwise been able to obtain without an intervention.

    The Section 8 Program is viewed by many to be a success, however, as the program has grown over the years some of its unforeseen effects have now become apparent. The program was not only intended to provide better living conditions for eligible low-income families, but it was also projected that it would be a means to disband many of the states’ Public Housing units, which have become breeding grounds for poverty and crime. The program has been criticized of not only failing to decentralize these impoverished areas that are riddled with unlawful activity, but instead has...

    After the Great Depression there was a need for federal housing assistance programs to help alleviate some of the distress that many Americans were experiencing during the United States housing crisis. The Section 8 Tenant Based Program, which is federally funded by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), helps to provide thousands of Americans each year with safe, decent and sanitary housing; something they might not have otherwise been able to obtain without an intervention.

    The Section 8 Program is viewed by many to be a success, however, as the program has grown over the years some of its unforeseen effects have now become apparent. The program was not only intended to provide better living conditions for eligible low-income families, but it was also projected that it would be a means to disband many of the states’ Public Housing units, which have become breeding grounds for poverty and crime. The program has been criticized of not only failing to decentralize these impoverished areas that are riddled with unlawful activity, but instead has been considered by some to be a major contributor in the destruction of many communities.

    The purpose of this research is to investigate some of the negative effects of the Section 8 Program on participating communities. It is also the intent of this study to educate individuals on how the program works to enable them to make well-informed decisions and determination of the program’s success and impacts. Suggestions were given based on research findings on how to improve the Section 8 Program while adhering to the program’s initial design and objectives. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Van Buren, John
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2014

    Urban gardening has become a very popular trend in the last few years in both affluent neighborhoods as a form of relaxation and in impoverished areas as a form of hunger relief. In impoverished areas, urban gardens are usually exclusively advertised as a solution to limited food access; however, there is a naive belief that these gardens are effective forms of mass food production. Presently, these gardens are not productive enough to globally effect food production and the environment. However, to the communities surrounding the gardens, the effects are immense. Urban gardens are cheap and effective solutions for many of the problems associated with poverty and food deserts. Some of the issues I will address are: obesity, education, social interactions, income supplementation, health issues, dangerous neighborhoods, and refugee assimilation.

    The overall approach will be based on public health and the health of the community. I will address the physical and psychological effects of urban gardens, but I will also touch upon the effects on the ecology and psychology of the...

    Urban gardening has become a very popular trend in the last few years in both affluent neighborhoods as a form of relaxation and in impoverished areas as a form of hunger relief. In impoverished areas, urban gardens are usually exclusively advertised as a solution to limited food access; however, there is a naive belief that these gardens are effective forms of mass food production. Presently, these gardens are not productive enough to globally effect food production and the environment. However, to the communities surrounding the gardens, the effects are immense. Urban gardens are cheap and effective solutions for many of the problems associated with poverty and food deserts. Some of the issues I will address are: obesity, education, social interactions, income supplementation, health issues, dangerous neighborhoods, and refugee assimilation.

    The overall approach will be based on public health and the health of the community. I will address the physical and psychological effects of urban gardens, but I will also touch upon the effects on the ecology and psychology of the neighborhood, urban and suburban planning and its accompanying laws, environmental psychology, and environmental education. I will initially detail some of the consequences associated with living in an impoverished area. I will use the various research and case studies performed, as well as some of my own observations working in these areas. I will then compile the individual research of various solutions to food deserts and assemble them into an analysis of the overall beneficial effects of urban gardens. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Year

Year ranges from 2002 to 2017

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations