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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Lewit, Eugene M.; Baker, Linda Schuurmann
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    This Child Indicators article focuses on available data on homeless families and children. First, it reviews different definitions of homelessness and the most common methods used to estimate the size of the homeless population. It then examines data on subgroups of homeless children and youths in the United States and considers the duration of homelessness for families with children that use shelter services. Finally, it examines trends in the numbers of families who are at risk of losing their housing. (author introduction)

    This Child Indicators article focuses on available data on homeless families and children. First, it reviews different definitions of homelessness and the most common methods used to estimate the size of the homeless population. It then examines data on subgroups of homeless children and youths in the United States and considers the duration of homelessness for families with children that use shelter services. Finally, it examines trends in the numbers of families who are at risk of losing their housing. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2001

    This Supplement to Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services [DHHS], 1999) documents the existence of striking disparities for minorities in mental health services and the underlying knowledge base. Racial and ethnic minorities have less access to mental health services than do whites. They are less likely to receive needed care. When they receive care, it is more likely to be poor in quality. This Supplement covers the four most recognized racial and ethnic minority groups in the United States. According to Federal classifications, African Americans (blacks), American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and white Americans (whites) are races. Hispanic American (Latino) is an ethnicity and may apply to a person of any race (U.S. Office of Management and Budget [OMB], 1978). For example, many people from the Dominican Republic identify their ethnicity as Hispanic or Latino and their race as black. (Author introduction)

    This Supplement to Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services [DHHS], 1999) documents the existence of striking disparities for minorities in mental health services and the underlying knowledge base. Racial and ethnic minorities have less access to mental health services than do whites. They are less likely to receive needed care. When they receive care, it is more likely to be poor in quality. This Supplement covers the four most recognized racial and ethnic minority groups in the United States. According to Federal classifications, African Americans (blacks), American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and white Americans (whites) are races. Hispanic American (Latino) is an ethnicity and may apply to a person of any race (U.S. Office of Management and Budget [OMB], 1978). For example, many people from the Dominican Republic identify their ethnicity as Hispanic or Latino and their race as black. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Meyers, Marcia K.; Jordan, Lucy P.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2006

    As women approach parity with men in their representation in the U.S. labor force, child care has become a critical concern both for families and for community development professionals. In this paper, we review recent literature on parental child care decisions and on socio-economic differences in child care utilization. We contrast two bodies of theoretical and empirical research on the determinants of child care arrangements, comparing models of individual consumption choice with models of socially constructed or situated patterns of action. This research suggests that parental child care decisions may be best understood as accommodations—to family and employment demands, social and cultural expectations, available information, and financial, social, and other resources—that often reproduce other forms of economic and social stratification. (Author abstract)

    As women approach parity with men in their representation in the U.S. labor force, child care has become a critical concern both for families and for community development professionals. In this paper, we review recent literature on parental child care decisions and on socio-economic differences in child care utilization. We contrast two bodies of theoretical and empirical research on the determinants of child care arrangements, comparing models of individual consumption choice with models of socially constructed or situated patterns of action. This research suggests that parental child care decisions may be best understood as accommodations—to family and employment demands, social and cultural expectations, available information, and financial, social, and other resources—that often reproduce other forms of economic and social stratification. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Love, John M. ; Klute, Mary M. ; Cohen, Rachel Chazan
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2006

    This is a presentation on What Makes a Difference? Early Head Start, Head Start, and More: The Cumulative Effects of Program Participation, Birth to 5, on Children and Families Living in Poverty from Head Start's Eighth National Research Conference. (Author introduction)

    This is a presentation on What Makes a Difference? Early Head Start, Head Start, and More: The Cumulative Effects of Program Participation, Birth to 5, on Children and Families Living in Poverty from Head Start's Eighth National Research Conference. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Ferguson, Ronald
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2007

    I was asked to comment on why African Americans are where they are in the income distribution, and why poverty is so much higher among African Americans than among whites. A fully adequate response would recount a turbulent history of slavery, white supremacy, prejudice, and discrimination in the United States and a long list of policies past and present. It would critique our national culture and, within it, the roles that race, materialism, and social class continue to play as they interact across multiple spheres of our collective experience. My approach here is much more limited and is based on my own recent work. Specifically, I have been focusing on causes and consequences of achievement gaps, in search of strategies for raising achievement levels for all students while reducing racial disparities. The emphasis in this short article is on racial disparities in home-learning conditions and some aspects of youth culture, including for the nonpoor. (author introduction)

    I was asked to comment on why African Americans are where they are in the income distribution, and why poverty is so much higher among African Americans than among whites. A fully adequate response would recount a turbulent history of slavery, white supremacy, prejudice, and discrimination in the United States and a long list of policies past and present. It would critique our national culture and, within it, the roles that race, materialism, and social class continue to play as they interact across multiple spheres of our collective experience. My approach here is much more limited and is based on my own recent work. Specifically, I have been focusing on causes and consequences of achievement gaps, in search of strategies for raising achievement levels for all students while reducing racial disparities. The emphasis in this short article is on racial disparities in home-learning conditions and some aspects of youth culture, including for the nonpoor. (author introduction)

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