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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Quinn, Jane
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1999

    Early adolescence is a time of burgeoning independence, autonomy, and focus on peers. It is also a time when individual interests, skills, and preferences become salient to young people. Not surprisingly, out-of-school programs designed to capture the interest of early teens are diverse in focus and varied in structure, ranging from sports teams to drop-in recreation centers, from museum apprenticeships to mentoring relationships between an individual teen and an adult. This article describes the array of various organizations that offer programs and services for youths in their early teens. It explains the philosophy of positive youth development that has emerged as a unifying theme in this long-standing but newly self-conscious field. Principles of best practice are reviewed, as are five key implementation challenges: increasing participation by youths; expanding access to programs, especially in low-income communities; improving funding; evaluating program effectiveness; and coordination with other youth services. The article closes with a discussion anticipating the new...

    Early adolescence is a time of burgeoning independence, autonomy, and focus on peers. It is also a time when individual interests, skills, and preferences become salient to young people. Not surprisingly, out-of-school programs designed to capture the interest of early teens are diverse in focus and varied in structure, ranging from sports teams to drop-in recreation centers, from museum apprenticeships to mentoring relationships between an individual teen and an adult. This article describes the array of various organizations that offer programs and services for youths in their early teens. It explains the philosophy of positive youth development that has emerged as a unifying theme in this long-standing but newly self-conscious field. Principles of best practice are reviewed, as are five key implementation challenges: increasing participation by youths; expanding access to programs, especially in low-income communities; improving funding; evaluating program effectiveness; and coordination with other youth services. The article closes with a discussion anticipating the new opportunities that accompany the attention and funding now going toward positive youth development programs that enrich the lives of young people through informal learning. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sweeney, Eileen; Schott, Liz; Lazere, Ed; Fremstad, Shawn; Goldberg, Heidi; Guyer, Jocelyn; Super, David; Johnson, Clifford
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    This report describes an array of innovative strategies and practical ideas for helping low-income families with children. There is a window of opportunity for these new strategies as many states have tremendous financial resources available. The Temporary Assistance For Needy Families (TANF) program rules have been clarified, and families are running up to the time limits which welfare reform imposed in 1996. The proposals are organized into three categories. The first, providing work supports for low-income families, includes suggestions for: (1) worker stipends; (2) state earned income tax credits; (3) transportation assistance; (4) accessible and affordable child care; (5) job retention and advancement services; (6) short-term aid; (7) expanded health care coverage; and (8) incentives to pay child support. A second section discusses addressing barriers parents face to enable them to work, and the third section considers the needs of specific populations, such as the disabled, legal immigrants, victims of violence, and low-income noncustodial parents. The primary focus is on...

    This report describes an array of innovative strategies and practical ideas for helping low-income families with children. There is a window of opportunity for these new strategies as many states have tremendous financial resources available. The Temporary Assistance For Needy Families (TANF) program rules have been clarified, and families are running up to the time limits which welfare reform imposed in 1996. The proposals are organized into three categories. The first, providing work supports for low-income families, includes suggestions for: (1) worker stipends; (2) state earned income tax credits; (3) transportation assistance; (4) accessible and affordable child care; (5) job retention and advancement services; (6) short-term aid; (7) expanded health care coverage; and (8) incentives to pay child support. A second section discusses addressing barriers parents face to enable them to work, and the third section considers the needs of specific populations, such as the disabled, legal immigrants, victims of violence, and low-income noncustodial parents. The primary focus is on promising initiatives that can be financed through the use of federal or state welfare funds. Two innovative strategies that can draw on federal or federally matched funds available through the Medicaid or food stamp programs are also included. Appendixes A and B discuss the rules governing use of TANF, and Appendix C discusses food stamp eligibility and benefits. Two other appendixes contain resources for additional information and a list of proposals cited in the report. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Colker, Laura J.; Dewees, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    In ever-increasing numbers, women with young children are joining the labor force. Fifty-eight percent of mothers with children under one year of age are either working or looking for work, and 64 percent of mothers with preschoolers are currently employed. Over three-fourths of mothers with school-age children work (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1999). High-quality child care is associated with children’s development of good work habits, peer relations, and emotional adjustment (Kaplan, 1998). Poor-quality care, on the other hand, has been linked with delays in language and reading skills and increased aggression towards peers and adults (Frank Porter Graham, 1999).
    
    Not surprisingly, finding appropriate child care is linked to success in moving off of welfare. Without access to reliable, quality child care services, parents are unable to secure jobs, retain them, and perform their duties responsibly. (author abstract)

    In ever-increasing numbers, women with young children are joining the labor force. Fifty-eight percent of mothers with children under one year of age are either working or looking for work, and 64 percent of mothers with preschoolers are currently employed. Over three-fourths of mothers with school-age children work (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1999). High-quality child care is associated with children’s development of good work habits, peer relations, and emotional adjustment (Kaplan, 1998). Poor-quality care, on the other hand, has been linked with delays in language and reading skills and increased aggression towards peers and adults (Frank Porter Graham, 1999).
    
    Not surprisingly, finding appropriate child care is linked to success in moving off of welfare. Without access to reliable, quality child care services, parents are unable to secure jobs, retain them, and perform their duties responsibly. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Derr, Michelle K.; Hill, Heather; Pavetti, LaDonna
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2000

    This guide, prepared by Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., for the Administration for Children and Families of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, examines mental health conditions among welfare recipients. It is intended to 1) provide an overview for welfare administrators of the common mental health conditions and the mental health system generally, 2) discuss specifically the types and prevalence of mental health disorders among welfare recipients, and 3) offer strategies for linking welfare recipients with mental health treatment and designing employment services to move these individuals into work. The guide has four sections:

    • Section I: The Prevalence of Mental Health Conditions and Their Influence on Employment provides definitions for mental health and mental illness as outlined in the U.S. Surgeon General’s report and in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). It also provides data on the prevalence and types of mental health disorders among the general and welfare populations, and examines how mental health may influence the probability of...

    This guide, prepared by Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., for the Administration for Children and Families of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, examines mental health conditions among welfare recipients. It is intended to 1) provide an overview for welfare administrators of the common mental health conditions and the mental health system generally, 2) discuss specifically the types and prevalence of mental health disorders among welfare recipients, and 3) offer strategies for linking welfare recipients with mental health treatment and designing employment services to move these individuals into work. The guide has four sections:

    • Section I: The Prevalence of Mental Health Conditions and Their Influence on Employment provides definitions for mental health and mental illness as outlined in the U.S. Surgeon General’s report and in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). It also provides data on the prevalence and types of mental health disorders among the general and welfare populations, and examines how mental health may influence the probability of employment.

    • Section II: Strategies and Resources for Addressing Mental Health Conditions offers a map for understanding the available treatment options, the state and local mental health systems, and the options for paying for mental health treatment. This section also covers the difficulties low-income families may have in accessing treatment.

    • Section III: Opportunities for Welfare Offices to Address the Needs of Welfare Recipients with Mental Health Conditions provides suggestions to staff and administrators of welfare offices on strategies for linking their clients with mental health services. The section begins with guidance on developing a screening process in the welfare office for mental health conditions and then covers the ways to link clients with existing services, use TANF funds to expand existing services, and create new services within the welfare office.

    • Section IV: Meeting the Challenges to Developing Services for Welfare Recipients with Mental Health Conditions outlines some potential challenges that welfare offices working to address their clients’ mental health conditions may confront and suggestions for addressing these challenges. These suggestions include defining clear goals for the welfare office, creating a policy environment that supports participation in mental health services, managing interagency differences in goals or approaches, and educating and training staff. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Blank, Susan; Riccio, James A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    If you are a welfare recipient living in public housing, are you less likely than other recipients to succeed in the labor market or to benefit from government welfare-to-work programs?

    Recent research by the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC) indicates that while recipients in public housing may be a more difficult-to-employ group in some locales, they may also benefit the most from mainstream welfare-to-work programs. It examines the evidence and its implications for policymakers. This policy brief was written by Susan Blank and James Riccio. It is based on an unpublished MDRC paper, written by James Riccio and Alan Orenstein, “Are Welfare Recipients in Public Housing Really Harder to Employ?” (2000). The study was supported by a grant from the Fannie Mae Foundation and the resources provided by the funders of the Jobs-Plus demonstration. This brief is one of a series on findings from the Jobs-Plus demonstration and related research.

    These findings open questions that need further exploration, but they strongly suggest that public officials ought...

    If you are a welfare recipient living in public housing, are you less likely than other recipients to succeed in the labor market or to benefit from government welfare-to-work programs?

    Recent research by the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC) indicates that while recipients in public housing may be a more difficult-to-employ group in some locales, they may also benefit the most from mainstream welfare-to-work programs. It examines the evidence and its implications for policymakers. This policy brief was written by Susan Blank and James Riccio. It is based on an unpublished MDRC paper, written by James Riccio and Alan Orenstein, “Are Welfare Recipients in Public Housing Really Harder to Employ?” (2000). The study was supported by a grant from the Fannie Mae Foundation and the resources provided by the funders of the Jobs-Plus demonstration. This brief is one of a series on findings from the Jobs-Plus demonstration and related research.

    These findings open questions that need further exploration, but they strongly suggest that public officials ought to make housing status a key consideration in developing strategies to strengthen mainstream welfare-to-work programs. They also indicate that special efforts may be required in order to promote big improvements in the self-sufficiency of welfare recipients in public housing. (author abstract)

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