Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Helburn, Suzanne W.; Howes, Carollee
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    This article summarizes what is known about the cost and quality of full-time child care in centers and family child care homes, and about parents' attention to quality in making child care choices. It relies primarily upon two recent studies which are among the first to collect detailed information about child care operating costs: the Cost, Quality, and Child Outcomes in Child Care Centers study and the Economics of Family Child Care study. Results indicate that mediocre quality is the rule and that parents often do not choose quality settings for their children. At the present time, child care quality is only modestly related to the cost of providing services. In part, the modesty of this relationship reflects the low wages of child care staff, the availability of in-kind donations in the nonprofit sector, and the altruistic motivations of many providers that depress direct costs and the fees charged for child care. The article concludes with recommendations for future action: (1) launch consumer education efforts; (2) implement higher standards for child care at the state...

    This article summarizes what is known about the cost and quality of full-time child care in centers and family child care homes, and about parents' attention to quality in making child care choices. It relies primarily upon two recent studies which are among the first to collect detailed information about child care operating costs: the Cost, Quality, and Child Outcomes in Child Care Centers study and the Economics of Family Child Care study. Results indicate that mediocre quality is the rule and that parents often do not choose quality settings for their children. At the present time, child care quality is only modestly related to the cost of providing services. In part, the modesty of this relationship reflects the low wages of child care staff, the availability of in-kind donations in the nonprofit sector, and the altruistic motivations of many providers that depress direct costs and the fees charged for child care. The article concludes with recommendations for future action: (1) launch consumer education efforts; (2) implement higher standards for child care at the state level; (3) avoid public policies that encourage people to become child care providers if they have no interest in such a career; (4) increase public and private investments in child care; and (5) develop the means to compensate child care workers as is appropriate for their levels of training, experience, and responsibility. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Reynolds, Arthur J.; Mann, Emily; Miedel, Wendy; Smokowski, Paul
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1997

    Early childhood interventions are now a popular strategy for counteracting social problems. They have high funding priority at all levels of government and strong support in local communities. Programs such as Even Start, Early Head Start, and other two-generational programs (that is, programs involving both mothers and children) have received considerable attention in the public and academic media. But there are many misunderstandings about what these programs are intended to do and what they have done. In this article, we review what is currently known about the effects of early childhood interventions for low-income and at-risk families, discuss some myths and realities, and highlight directions for future research and program development.

    Early childhood intervention is a general descriptor for a wide variety of programs. For this article, it is defined as the provision of educational, psychosocial, and health services, during any of the first eight years of life, to children who are at risk of poor outcomes because they face social-environmental disadvantages or have...

    Early childhood interventions are now a popular strategy for counteracting social problems. They have high funding priority at all levels of government and strong support in local communities. Programs such as Even Start, Early Head Start, and other two-generational programs (that is, programs involving both mothers and children) have received considerable attention in the public and academic media. But there are many misunderstandings about what these programs are intended to do and what they have done. In this article, we review what is currently known about the effects of early childhood interventions for low-income and at-risk families, discuss some myths and realities, and highlight directions for future research and program development.

    Early childhood intervention is a general descriptor for a wide variety of programs. For this article, it is defined as the provision of educational, psychosocial, and health services, during any of the first eight years of life, to children who are at risk of poor outcomes because they face social-environmental disadvantages or have developmental disabilities. These interventions are compensatory; they are designed to prevent problematic behavior such as academic underachievement, low motivation, or school failure in populations at risk. We focus primarily on programs for economically disadvantaged children aged about 2½ to 5. Such programs constitute the largest array of early childhood interventions. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Morris, Pamela; Knox, Virginia; Gennetian, Lisa A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    This policy brief deepens our understanding of how changes in welfare policies affect the well-being of elementary school-age and adolescent children by showing how reforms targeted at parents can have important consequences for their children. Specifically, the findings reported here demonstrate that welfare policies that aim to improve the economic security of families can benefit elementary school-age children and can complement school-based interventions by giving children a better start in their education. For adolescents, the results suggest that policies that increase parental employment can have negative effects on school achievement, suggesting a new reason for policymakers to spur efforts to develop more flexible child care as well as strategies that can effectively engage low-income youth and help them move successfully into adulthood.

    Building on a synthesis of random assignment studies that evaluated nearly a dozen programs, this brief incorporates new long-term results from the National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies (NEWWS) and the Canadian Self-...

    This policy brief deepens our understanding of how changes in welfare policies affect the well-being of elementary school-age and adolescent children by showing how reforms targeted at parents can have important consequences for their children. Specifically, the findings reported here demonstrate that welfare policies that aim to improve the economic security of families can benefit elementary school-age children and can complement school-based interventions by giving children a better start in their education. For adolescents, the results suggest that policies that increase parental employment can have negative effects on school achievement, suggesting a new reason for policymakers to spur efforts to develop more flexible child care as well as strategies that can effectively engage low-income youth and help them move successfully into adulthood.

    Building on a synthesis of random assignment studies that evaluated nearly a dozen programs, this brief incorporates new long-term results from the National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies (NEWWS) and the Canadian Self-Sufficiency Project (SSP), as well as just released findings from Connecticut’s Jobs First program, to explore the effects of welfare and work policies on elementary school-age children. For adolescents, this brief reports emerging findings from syntheses of eight studies that evaluate the effects on adolescents of 16 programs that aimed to increase the self-sufficiency of low-income parents. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    The goal of this report is to review evidence to determine the likelihood that states can meet the challenge of providing high quality, comprehensive early childhood education and whether states would be dedicated to this effort. It examines the role that states play in comprehensive early childhood education by reviewing:

    1. states’ level of support for pre-kindergarten programs,
    2. the quality and effectiveness of state-funded pre-kindergarten, and
    3. state efforts to build integrated, comprehensive early childhood systems for children from birth through age five that have a focus on school readiness. (author abstract)

    The goal of this report is to review evidence to determine the likelihood that states can meet the challenge of providing high quality, comprehensive early childhood education and whether states would be dedicated to this effort. It examines the role that states play in comprehensive early childhood education by reviewing:

    1. states’ level of support for pre-kindergarten programs,
    2. the quality and effectiveness of state-funded pre-kindergarten, and
    3. state efforts to build integrated, comprehensive early childhood systems for children from birth through age five that have a focus on school readiness. (author abstract)
  • Individual Author: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    This paper describes the limited educational progress for children in Head Start and the problems resulting from a fragmented approach to early childhood programs and services. The paper also presents evidence from early childhood research and documents state efforts that have successfully addressed these problems. Finally, the paper explains the President's proposal for Head Start reauthorization, which builds on the evidence to strengthen the program and, through coordination, improve preschool programs in general to help ensure that children are prepared to succeed in school. (author abstract)

    This paper describes the limited educational progress for children in Head Start and the problems resulting from a fragmented approach to early childhood programs and services. The paper also presents evidence from early childhood research and documents state efforts that have successfully addressed these problems. Finally, the paper explains the President's proposal for Head Start reauthorization, which builds on the evidence to strengthen the program and, through coordination, improve preschool programs in general to help ensure that children are prepared to succeed in school. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1996 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations