Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Hershey, Alan M.; Pavetti, LaDonna A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1997

    Most welfare-to-work programs designed to help single mothers leave welfare for employment focus on the challenge of finding a job. This article looks beyond the point of employment to consider the difficulty many former welfare recipients have keeping their jobs. The authors review evidence showing that many families cycle back and forth between welfare and work, losing jobs and returning to public assistance while they seek work again. Factors contributing to high rates of job loss include characteristics of the job and of the worker: Temporary jobs, frequent layoffs, low pay in relation to work expenses, lack of experience meeting employer expectations, and personal or family problems all lead to dismissals and resignations. Drawing from the experience of innovative programs, the authors recommend policy changes and program approaches that can help families overcome setbacks and stabilize their lives as they move from welfare into increasingly stable employment. (author abstract)

    Most welfare-to-work programs designed to help single mothers leave welfare for employment focus on the challenge of finding a job. This article looks beyond the point of employment to consider the difficulty many former welfare recipients have keeping their jobs. The authors review evidence showing that many families cycle back and forth between welfare and work, losing jobs and returning to public assistance while they seek work again. Factors contributing to high rates of job loss include characteristics of the job and of the worker: Temporary jobs, frequent layoffs, low pay in relation to work expenses, lack of experience meeting employer expectations, and personal or family problems all lead to dismissals and resignations. Drawing from the experience of innovative programs, the authors recommend policy changes and program approaches that can help families overcome setbacks and stabilize their lives as they move from welfare into increasingly stable employment. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Committee for Economic Development Research and Policy Committee
    Reference Type: Report, White Papers
    Year: 2000

    The signing of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) in 1996 fundamentally changed the welfare system in America. The emphasis shifted from supporting low-income people who do not work to helping low-income people work to support themselves. This report examines the record of welfare reform in the wider context of the low-skill labor market. It asks how former welfare recipients have fared in finding employment, reducing dependency, and raising incomes. Recommendations are made for completing and improving the program for moving individuals from welfare to work. (author abstract)

    The signing of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) in 1996 fundamentally changed the welfare system in America. The emphasis shifted from supporting low-income people who do not work to helping low-income people work to support themselves. This report examines the record of welfare reform in the wider context of the low-skill labor market. It asks how former welfare recipients have fared in finding employment, reducing dependency, and raising incomes. Recommendations are made for completing and improving the program for moving individuals from welfare to work. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sweeney, Eileen; Schott, Liz; Lazere, Ed; Fremstad, Shawn; Goldberg, Heidi; Guyer, Jocelyn; Super, David; Johnson, Clifford
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    This report describes an array of innovative strategies and practical ideas for helping low-income families with children. There is a window of opportunity for these new strategies as many states have tremendous financial resources available. The Temporary Assistance For Needy Families (TANF) program rules have been clarified, and families are running up to the time limits which welfare reform imposed in 1996. The proposals are organized into three categories. The first, providing work supports for low-income families, includes suggestions for: (1) worker stipends; (2) state earned income tax credits; (3) transportation assistance; (4) accessible and affordable child care; (5) job retention and advancement services; (6) short-term aid; (7) expanded health care coverage; and (8) incentives to pay child support. A second section discusses addressing barriers parents face to enable them to work, and the third section considers the needs of specific populations, such as the disabled, legal immigrants, victims of violence, and low-income noncustodial parents. The primary focus is on...

    This report describes an array of innovative strategies and practical ideas for helping low-income families with children. There is a window of opportunity for these new strategies as many states have tremendous financial resources available. The Temporary Assistance For Needy Families (TANF) program rules have been clarified, and families are running up to the time limits which welfare reform imposed in 1996. The proposals are organized into three categories. The first, providing work supports for low-income families, includes suggestions for: (1) worker stipends; (2) state earned income tax credits; (3) transportation assistance; (4) accessible and affordable child care; (5) job retention and advancement services; (6) short-term aid; (7) expanded health care coverage; and (8) incentives to pay child support. A second section discusses addressing barriers parents face to enable them to work, and the third section considers the needs of specific populations, such as the disabled, legal immigrants, victims of violence, and low-income noncustodial parents. The primary focus is on promising initiatives that can be financed through the use of federal or state welfare funds. Two innovative strategies that can draw on federal or federally matched funds available through the Medicaid or food stamp programs are also included. Appendixes A and B discuss the rules governing use of TANF, and Appendix C discusses food stamp eligibility and benefits. Two other appendixes contain resources for additional information and a list of proposals cited in the report. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fein, David J.; Beecroft, Eric; Long, David A.; Catalfamo, Andrée Rose
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    In August 1999, Riverside Community College (RCC), in Riverside County, California, launched an innovative program designed to prepare welfare recipients for college and help them move to better jobs. Set on a community college campus, New Visions provides a 24-week program of academic instruction and support services, followed by up to five months of credit-bearing course work in an occupational mini-program. In order to be eligible, clients must have a high school diploma or GED and be working at least 20 hours a week. The program is a partnership between RCC and the Riverside County Department of Public Social Services (RCDPSS).

    Abt Associates Inc.’s five-year evaluation of New Visions is the first random assignment study of the effectiveness of a special college program for welfare recipients. The evaluation, which also includes a study of program implementation, will answer several important questions. The first is whether offering intensive supports encourages single parents on Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) to return to school after they have gone to...

    In August 1999, Riverside Community College (RCC), in Riverside County, California, launched an innovative program designed to prepare welfare recipients for college and help them move to better jobs. Set on a community college campus, New Visions provides a 24-week program of academic instruction and support services, followed by up to five months of credit-bearing course work in an occupational mini-program. In order to be eligible, clients must have a high school diploma or GED and be working at least 20 hours a week. The program is a partnership between RCC and the Riverside County Department of Public Social Services (RCDPSS).

    Abt Associates Inc.’s five-year evaluation of New Visions is the first random assignment study of the effectiveness of a special college program for welfare recipients. The evaluation, which also includes a study of program implementation, will answer several important questions. The first is whether offering intensive supports encourages single parents on Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) to return to school after they have gone to work. The second is whether making work a condition of education and training increases motivation to learn and enhances short-run job retention and advancement opportunities. The third is whether providing remedial education and support services helps participants to succeed in regular college programs, thereby increasing their access to higher-paying jobs over the long run…

    This report reviews the literature on special programs for welfare recipients at two- and four-year colleges, describes the New Visions demonstration, and provides initial findings on program implementation and client experiences. The findings come at a very early juncture in the demonstration and are offered as an introduction to New Visions rather than as a preview of its likely outcomes. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Morris, Pamela A.; Huston, Aletha C.; Duncan, Greg J.; Crosby, Danielle A.; Bos, Johannes M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    Over the past 30 years, welfare and other public policies for families living in poverty have developed a primary objective of increasing parents’ self-sufficiency by requiring and supporting employment. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA), passed in 1996, was a milestone in this effort, limiting the length of time that families can receive federal cash welfare assistance and requiring most of them to participate in employment-related activities to be eligible for such assistance. In addition, during the 1990s the maximum benefits available to working-poor families through the Earned Income Credit (the federal tax credit that supplements the earnings of low-income families), publicly funded health insurance, and child care assistance were expanded to reward work outside the welfare system. Because many of these benefit expansions encourage parental employment, and because other changes have weakened the safety net for families in which parents do not maintain employment, all these developments may have important consequences for children...

    Over the past 30 years, welfare and other public policies for families living in poverty have developed a primary objective of increasing parents’ self-sufficiency by requiring and supporting employment. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA), passed in 1996, was a milestone in this effort, limiting the length of time that families can receive federal cash welfare assistance and requiring most of them to participate in employment-related activities to be eligible for such assistance. In addition, during the 1990s the maximum benefits available to working-poor families through the Earned Income Credit (the federal tax credit that supplements the earnings of low-income families), publicly funded health insurance, and child care assistance were expanded to reward work outside the welfare system. Because many of these benefit expansions encourage parental employment, and because other changes have weakened the safety net for families in which parents do not maintain employment, all these developments may have important consequences for children.

    Proponents of changes in welfare policy have argued that parental employment benefits children by providing them with family role models who work and are self-sufficient and by introducing a regular schedule into the family routine. But employment may also create stress in the family, reduce parents’ opportunities to spend time with their children, and interfere with parents’ monitoring of their children’s activities - particularly in single-parent families. Children may also be influenced by parental employment through changes in family resources: If family income or subsidies supporting such work-related needs as child care increase, children may benefit; if family resources decrease, children may be harmed. The critical question for policy is not “What are the effects of welfare reform on children?” Instead, it is “What program features are most likely to promote children’s well-being?” or, conversely, “What program features harm children or leave them unaffected?”

    This monograph synthesizes the results of five large-scale studies that together examine the effects on children of 11 different employment-based welfare and antipoverty programs aimed primarily at single-parent families. (A companion document examines the effects of these and other programs on parental employment, welfare use, and income.) Specifically, we attempt to identify the program features that are associated with effects on children’s school achievement, social behavior, and health. Although most of the studies were under way by 1996, they were designed to test the effects of many program features that have been implemented by the states since the federal welfare law of 1996 was passed. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1997 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations